The Farm Report: Chareva Goes All Paul Bunyon

Chareva ordered a wood-chopping axe awhile back and has been anxiously awaiting her chance to become a log-splitter.  The axe arrived just before the weekend, so she put it to use for the first time yesterday.  (My job in this project is to take the big ol’ chainsaw and cut the downed trees into sections.  Just thought I’d mention that before anyone accuses me of giving my wife all the tough work.)

As you can see from the video I shot, she’s getting the hang of it pretty quickly and swings a mean axe.  (Have I mentioned she’s stronger than she looks?)

Speaking of videos, when I went to the YouTube video manager yesterday, I was surprised to see the view counter on this video, which I uploaded in 2009:

That video has racked up more than 655,000 views.  I had no idea until yesterday.

 

 

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36 thoughts on “The Farm Report: Chareva Goes All Paul Bunyon

  1. Suzie_B

    Do you have some wedges for bigger pieces – looks like you have some big logs in that pile?

    We don’t have wedges yet, but they’re on the list.

    Reply
  2. Chris B.

    Regarding the “Why You Got Fat” video – why have you disabled comments?

    That video got discovered by some trolls who would leave negative comment after negative comment, often quoting bogus studies, T. Colin Campbell, etc. I didn’t have time to engage in an endless debate, and if I let a comment go unanswered, they’d comment that I didn’t wasn’t answering because I wasn’t able to dispute them. So I cut off comments.

    Reply
  3. Robb

    Tom, do you know if the Fathead documentary is going to be coming back to Netflix’s streaming service in the future?

    It was a two-year run that finished recently. I don’t know yet if they’re open to taking the new version.

    Reply
  4. labrat

    Swinging an axe gets old real fast. Don’t be suprised when the next “toy” is a log splitter.

    One of those is on my wish-list, in fact.

    Reply
  5. Bret

    Whoa!! Don’t make this lady mad when she’s holding an ax!

    Congrats on the 600K+ views. You said recently that the wisdom of crowds effect would win out over time, and I think you are right. Today I was browsing the Diet & Nutrition section of a big chain book store, and I was amazed at how many books said to cut the carbs and stop being afraid of butter, lard, and coconut oil. I was also glad to see many of the books featured in Fat Head prominently placed on the shelves.

    Yup, it’s encouraging to see how many are ignoring the standard advice these days.

    Reply
  6. Suzie_B

    Do you have some wedges for bigger pieces – looks like you have some big logs in that pile?

    We don’t have wedges yet, but they’re on the list.

    Reply
  7. Chris B.

    Regarding the “Why You Got Fat” video – why have you disabled comments?

    That video got discovered by some trolls who would leave negative comment after negative comment, often quoting bogus studies, T. Colin Campbell, etc. I didn’t have time to engage in an endless debate, and if I let a comment go unanswered, they’d comment that I didn’t wasn’t answering because I wasn’t able to dispute them. So I cut off comments.

    Reply
  8. Robb

    Tom, do you know if the Fathead documentary is going to be coming back to Netflix’s streaming service in the future?

    It was a two-year run that finished recently. I don’t know yet if they’re open to taking the new version.

    Reply
  9. labrat

    Swinging an axe gets old real fast. Don’t be suprised when the next “toy” is a log splitter.

    One of those is on my wish-list, in fact.

    Reply
  10. Bret

    Whoa!! Don’t make this lady mad when she’s holding an ax!

    Congrats on the 600K+ views. You said recently that the wisdom of crowds effect would win out over time, and I think you are right. Today I was browsing the Diet & Nutrition section of a big chain book store, and I was amazed at how many books said to cut the carbs and stop being afraid of butter, lard, and coconut oil. I was also glad to see many of the books featured in Fat Head prominently placed on the shelves.

    Yup, it’s encouraging to see how many are ignoring the standard advice these days.

    Reply
  11. KC

    A sledge hammer and splitting wedges are good for larger round pieces then after splitting them with the sledge and wedge then you can use the splitting axe. Watch out for knots since those make splitting very difficult. Another good use for the sledge and wedges when you have big knots to deal with.

    A wedge would definitely help.

    Reply
  12. Bill C.

    Chareva swings a mean axe! Watching the video gave me flashbacks from The Shining.

    I noticed that if it doesn’t split though the first time she pulls it out, sets the log back up and takes another crack at it. I use a hammer when that happens. A couple swings persuades the log to split the rest of the way. It’s a lot quicker than setting it back up and swinging again.

    Yeah, a wedge is on our list.

    Reply
  13. Jay Jay

    I’ve been reading you for many years, and have received much useful advice from you. So I figured I’d try to pass something along to you that you might find useful too!

    I’ve lived in the woods for about 15 years (about 300 miles North of you on the Blue Ridge).

    First, wood splits, and saws, much, much, MUCH, easier when it is still green. So cut and split it as soon as possible if it’s an uprooted fall or a fresh fell.

    Buy an electric chainsaw sharpener ($50 or so at Harbor Freight), and learn how to use it. I sharpen my saws every 2 gas tanks full of use if I’m cutting dried oak or similar woods. Every 4-5 tanks if I’m cutting green.

    If you’re splitting it manually, it can be much less of a muscular/strength type workout if you use wedges instead of a swung splitter. Buy 4 or 5 steel ones. They also work great if you split the log from the side. Working from the side, you add wedges as you work your way down the length of the log. They take more total strokes, but less effort is required for each stroke. You can even play Abe Lincoln, and split fence rails!

    Hand and foot powered hydraulic splitters are pretty awesome too. I have one of each that I use as back ups for my motor powered splitter, and for exercise during the cooler parts of the year. They offer I nice work out (balanced if you have one of each), but you won’t want to use them in the heat of summer! Even the kids can operate them.

    I appreciate the tips. I’m pretty sure my chainsaw blade is getting dull already. The last couple of sections I cut seemed like much harder work than they should have been.

    Reply
  14. Lynda

    Way to go Chareva!!! My goodness Tom found a good’n when he met you. Mind you, I suspect you found a good’n when you met Tom 🙂

    I certainly agree with that first sentiment.

    Reply
  15. KC

    A sledge hammer and splitting wedges are good for larger round pieces then after splitting them with the sledge and wedge then you can use the splitting axe. Watch out for knots since those make splitting very difficult. Another good use for the sledge and wedges when you have big knots to deal with.

    A wedge would definitely help.

    Reply
  16. Bill C.

    Chareva swings a mean axe! Watching the video gave me flashbacks from The Shining.

    I noticed that if it doesn’t split though the first time she pulls it out, sets the log back up and takes another crack at it. I use a hammer when that happens. A couple swings persuades the log to split the rest of the way. It’s a lot quicker than setting it back up and swinging again.

    Yeah, a wedge is on our list.

    Reply
  17. Jay Jay

    I’ve been reading you for many years, and have received much useful advice from you. So I figured I’d try to pass something along to you that you might find useful too!

    I’ve lived in the woods for about 15 years (about 300 miles North of you on the Blue Ridge).

    First, wood splits, and saws, much, much, MUCH, easier when it is still green. So cut and split it as soon as possible if it’s an uprooted fall or a fresh fell.

    Buy an electric chainsaw sharpener ($50 or so at Harbor Freight), and learn how to use it. I sharpen my saws every 2 gas tanks full of use if I’m cutting dried oak or similar woods. Every 4-5 tanks if I’m cutting green.

    If you’re splitting it manually, it can be much less of a muscular/strength type workout if you use wedges instead of a swung splitter. Buy 4 or 5 steel ones. They also work great if you split the log from the side. Working from the side, you add wedges as you work your way down the length of the log. They take more total strokes, but less effort is required for each stroke. You can even play Abe Lincoln, and split fence rails!

    Hand and foot powered hydraulic splitters are pretty awesome too. I have one of each that I use as back ups for my motor powered splitter, and for exercise during the cooler parts of the year. They offer I nice work out (balanced if you have one of each), but you won’t want to use them in the heat of summer! Even the kids can operate them.

    I appreciate the tips. I’m pretty sure my chainsaw blade is getting dull already. The last couple of sections I cut seemed like much harder work than they should have been.

    Reply
  18. Lynda

    Way to go Chareva!!! My goodness Tom found a good’n when he met you. Mind you, I suspect you found a good’n when you met Tom 🙂

    I certainly agree with that first sentiment.

    Reply
  19. Lobstah

    Your saw, when properly sharpened, should literally pull itself through the log. If you have to push on it, it’s getting dull. I have 3 chains, so I don’t have to stop in the middle of cutting to take the time to sharpen…just takes a minute to put a new chain on, and after you do it once or twice, you can do it very quickly.
    Dull chains are dangerous, because you start forcing things. Also wears you out much faster as you are using muscles that you don’t need when the chain is sharp.

    Yes, green splits a bit better, and definitely cuts better, but I always loved splitting frozen wood too. Seems like it just snaps apart. Days when I wanted to get a lot of wood split, I used to line up 10 rounds in two rows of 5, and just go down the center of the rows and split them right on the ground. Takes a lot of time to keep putting a round up on a splitting stump.

    Ahhhhhh…the good ol’ days 😉

    Jim

    I was having to push pretty hard to cut the sections over the weekend, so it’s definitely time to change chains and get the one I’ve been using sharpened.

    Reply
  20. Lobstah

    Your saw, when properly sharpened, should literally pull itself through the log. If you have to push on it, it’s getting dull. I have 3 chains, so I don’t have to stop in the middle of cutting to take the time to sharpen…just takes a minute to put a new chain on, and after you do it once or twice, you can do it very quickly.
    Dull chains are dangerous, because you start forcing things. Also wears you out much faster as you are using muscles that you don’t need when the chain is sharp.

    Yes, green splits a bit better, and definitely cuts better, but I always loved splitting frozen wood too. Seems like it just snaps apart. Days when I wanted to get a lot of wood split, I used to line up 10 rounds in two rows of 5, and just go down the center of the rows and split them right on the ground. Takes a lot of time to keep putting a round up on a splitting stump.

    Ahhhhhh…the good ol’ days 😉

    Jim

    I was having to push pretty hard to cut the sections over the weekend, so it’s definitely time to change chains and get the one I’ve been using sharpened.

    Reply
  21. Chareva

    Jay Jay and Lobstah, THANK YOU. We have a big pile to get through and with Tom as busy as he is, I’ll need to jump in to help get it done. I like the suggestion of using wedges and splitting length wise – with all the fencing projects we have planned, it would be great to be able to use some of the materials we already have on hand. Regarding ‘green wood’, now I know why my neighbor keeps mentioning the wood pile every time he sees me. He’s probably thinking, “Newbies. They’ll learn the hard way”.

    Reply
  22. Chareva

    Jay Jay and Lobstah, THANK YOU. We have a big pile to get through and with Tom as busy as he is, I’ll need to jump in to help get it done. I like the suggestion of using wedges and splitting length wise – with all the fencing projects we have planned, it would be great to be able to use some of the materials we already have on hand. Regarding ‘green wood’, now I know why my neighbor keeps mentioning the wood pile every time he sees me. He’s probably thinking, “Newbies. They’ll learn the hard way”.

    Reply
  23. James

    Hey Tom,

    I know this has nothing to due with your post but since it’s the newest one I’ll ask it here. I just got done watching The Big Fat Fiasco on youtube. WOW excellent!! better than Fat Head. My only question is how do you explain those people who eat a “balanced diet” including all those carbs (like the my plate) that are so healthy?? I’m really confused (which is pretty easily done).

    Some people are prone to becoming insulin-resistant, some people aren’t. What our lousy diets have done is push more people over their tolerance level. Not everyone will get sick or fat from a lousy diet, just as not everyone who smokes will develop lung cancer or emphysema.

    Reply
    1. James

      Makes sense now, thanks!! My Grandma and Grandpa smoked for 60+ years, neither one had either of those.

      Reply
  24. James

    Hey Tom,

    I know this has nothing to due with your post but since it’s the newest one I’ll ask it here. I just got done watching The Big Fat Fiasco on youtube. WOW excellent!! better than Fat Head. My only question is how do you explain those people who eat a “balanced diet” including all those carbs (like the my plate) that are so healthy?? I’m really confused (which is pretty easily done).

    Some people are prone to becoming insulin-resistant, some people aren’t. What our lousy diets have done is push more people over their tolerance level. Not everyone will get sick or fat from a lousy diet, just as not everyone who smokes will develop lung cancer or emphysema.

    Reply
    1. James

      Makes sense now, thanks!! My Grandma and Grandpa smoked for 60+ years, neither one had either of those.

      Reply
  25. Bruce

    Wood splitting is sorta fun. I too learned the hard way to split it when it’s green. I thought if you would let it season, it would split easier.

    If you have a chance, go to youtube and look up splitting wood. There was one guy who had an old tire forced onto a large splitting stump that was splitting, I believe, some birch or softer wood. Force as much wood as you can in the tire, start splitting, none of the wood falls off the stump, less bending and back ache.

    Good tip, thanks.

    Reply
  26. Bruce

    Wood splitting is sorta fun. I too learned the hard way to split it when it’s green. I thought if you would let it season, it would split easier.

    If you have a chance, go to youtube and look up splitting wood. There was one guy who had an old tire forced onto a large splitting stump that was splitting, I believe, some birch or softer wood. Force as much wood as you can in the tire, start splitting, none of the wood falls off the stump, less bending and back ache.

    Good tip, thanks.

    Reply

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