Chareva’s Kitchen: Alfredo Sauce on Kelp Noodles and Berry Ice Cream

My nephew Eric (The Older Brother’s Oldest Son) emailed me a few days ago to tell me he’d picked up a copy of The Fat Fast Cookbook and was trying some recipes, but couldn’t find shiratake noodles where he lives.  He did, however, find kelp noodles and told me he prefers them over shiratake noodles.

So I ordered a package of kelp noodles, and last night I served them with my quick and easy Alfredo sauce as a side dish.  They were a hit.  The kelp noodles are slightly crunchy, sort of like a cross between shiratake noodles and bean sprouts, and have a good flavor.  I’ll be ordering more of them.  If you can find them in a local store, great.  If not, I added an Amazon store link to them in the left sidebar.  (If you order anything on Amazon by clicking through an ad here, we get some Amazon credits, which helps support the blog.)

Like shiratake noodles, the kelp noodles don’t require cooking, just rinsing and separating.

Here’s the recipe for the Alfredo sauce if you’d like to give it a try.  Please note this is the quick and easy version.  If you want to shred your own parmesan, press your own fresh garlic, milk a cow and make your own butter and sour cream, go for it.

Ingredients
4 ounces Kerry Gold butter (half the package)
1/2 cup sour cream
3/4 cup parmesan
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt

Steps
Melt the butter on a low temperature
Stir in the parmesan and melt it
Stir in the sour cream
Stir in the garlic salt

The sauce ends up on the salty side, which I like when we pour it over bland foods like spaghetti squash, kept noodles, spinach, etc.  If you don’t like salty sauces, you can substitute garlic powder or fresh garlic and then salt to taste afterwards.

When Chareva and the girls joined me for a recent episode of The Livin’ La Vida Low Carb Show, she mentioned how she and the girls make berry ice cream.  I’d never seen them do it, but they made some a couple of days ago and took a picture.  Couldn’t be easier.  Chareva keeps frozen berries in the freezer.  To make ice cream, she puts the frozen berries (raspberries in this picture) in a dish and adds some heavy cream.  After the cream begins to freeze a bit, she stirs it up with the berries.

That’s it.  The girls love it — no stevia or other sweetener required.

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59 thoughts on “Chareva’s Kitchen: Alfredo Sauce on Kelp Noodles and Berry Ice Cream

  1. Kathy

    And Chareva’s cookbook is coming out when?

    I just picked up a couple packages of tofu shiratake noodles but haven’t tried them yet. If I don’t care for them, I’ll try the kelp noodles. Are they refrigerated like the shiratake?

    Thanks – both of you – for all you do.

    They don’t require refrigeration. They were shipped in a plain ol’ Amazon box.

    I plan to get back to writing our book for parents and kids after the cruise. Right now my non-work time is going into writing the pre-cruise roast.

    Reply
  2. Nads

    Tom, are the Shiritake noodles the same as miracle noodles or slim-me noodles ie the almost no calorie and no carb noodles from Japan and China? Thanks for the recipe for the sauce! I discovered that icecream for myself on about day two of LCHF and I keep going back to it. Great for breakfast with greek yoghurt too.

    That’s right, same noodles.

    Reply
  3. Merlin

    That recipe has me willing to try the kelp noodles again. I tried them in an Asian-style noodle soup, and it didn’t really do it for me.

    Besides, that sauce sounds good enough that I could just have it on broccoli if I don’t like the noodles.

    We’ve been trying to make a decent cheese sauce without wheat flour. All attempts at making it with coconut flour were sub par. My wife whipped up a batch with chickpea flour this week which is a resounding success. I’m going to get her to codify it.

    The sauce is great on broccoli, spinach, spaghetti squash … name it.

    Reply
  4. Kathy

    And Chareva’s cookbook is coming out when?

    I just picked up a couple packages of tofu shiratake noodles but haven’t tried them yet. If I don’t care for them, I’ll try the kelp noodles. Are they refrigerated like the shiratake?

    Thanks – both of you – for all you do.

    They don’t require refrigeration. They were shipped in a plain ol’ Amazon box.

    I plan to get back to writing our book for parents and kids after the cruise. Right now my non-work time is going into writing the pre-cruise roast.

    Reply
  5. Nads

    Tom, are the Shiritake noodles the same as miracle noodles or slim-me noodles ie the almost no calorie and no carb noodles from Japan and China? Thanks for the recipe for the sauce! I discovered that icecream for myself on about day two of LCHF and I keep going back to it. Great for breakfast with greek yoghurt too.

    That’s right, same noodles.

    Reply
  6. Marilyn

    I see you use Daisy sour cream, too. I’m so glad I discovered that stuff years ago. Even their “lite” version isn’t bad –just has a bit of skim milk added.

    I make Alfredo sauce by cooking some onion in butter, then adding heavy whipping cream and grated parmesan. Useful as sauce for lots of different things. 🙂

    Reply
  7. Gilana

    Merlin: Any creamy or cheesy sauce that needs thickening (and that heavy cream and regular shredded cheese won’t take care of) is easy with the addition of an ounce or two of cream cheese. The gums in cream cheese are magical. There’s really no need to go searching for a wheat-flour substitute for those kinds of sauces, in my experience.

    Reply
  8. Gilana

    Merlin: Any creamy or cheesy sauce that needs thickening (and that heavy cream and regular shredded cheese won’t take care of) is easy with the addition of an ounce or two of cream cheese. The gums in cream cheese are magical. There’s really no need to go searching for a wheat-flour substitute for those kinds of sauces, in my experience.

    Reply
  9. Merlin

    That recipe has me willing to try the kelp noodles again. I tried them in an Asian-style noodle soup, and it didn’t really do it for me.

    Besides, that sauce sounds good enough that I could just have it on broccoli if I don’t like the noodles.

    We’ve been trying to make a decent cheese sauce without wheat flour. All attempts at making it with coconut flour were sub par. My wife whipped up a batch with chickpea flour this week which is a resounding success. I’m going to get her to codify it.

    The sauce is great on broccoli, spinach, spaghetti squash … name it.

    Reply
    1. Merlin

      I just made a batch and put it on a red pepper and mushroom omelette for my folks. Excellent!

      Reply
  10. Ron K.

    Are you using raw dairy for your cream? I have been using only raw milk/cream for 7yrs and find that it makes a big difference. The probiotic benefit alone is reason enough to use raw cream.

    Sally Fallon is getting it right on this issue when calling raw milk “magic food”.

    Chareva picks up raw milk now and then, but the heavy cream in this picture is from a grocery store.

    Reply
  11. Marilyn

    I see you use Daisy sour cream, too. I’m so glad I discovered that stuff years ago. Even their “lite” version isn’t bad –just has a bit of skim milk added.

    I make Alfredo sauce by cooking some onion in butter, then adding heavy whipping cream and grated parmesan. Useful as sauce for lots of different things. 🙂

    Reply
  12. Gilana

    Merlin: Any creamy or cheesy sauce that needs thickening (and that heavy cream and regular shredded cheese won’t take care of) is easy with the addition of an ounce or two of cream cheese. The gums in cream cheese are magical. There’s really no need to go searching for a wheat-flour substitute for those kinds of sauces, in my experience.

    Reply
  13. Ron K.

    Are you using raw dairy for your cream? I have been using only raw milk/cream for 7yrs and find that it makes a big difference. The probiotic benefit alone is reason enough to use raw cream.

    Sally Fallon is getting it right on this issue when calling raw milk “magic food”.

    Chareva picks up raw milk now and then, but the heavy cream in this picture is from a grocery store.

    Reply
  14. Devin

    I’ve been enjoying that berry “ice cream” since I first started eating like a Fat Head. It’s been a life saver to beat sweet cravings or when my whole family is making ice cream sundaes and I feel the temptation to join them. Delicious, satisfying, and healthy.

    Reply
  15. Firebird

    I tried the recipes in the Fat Fast Cookbook and they were awesome! I tried my mom’s old recipe for spaghetti with ricotta cheese (a side dish she use to make with chicken parmesan), which was my favorite meal. it worked beautifully…ricotta cheese, butter, salt and pepper. Super easy.

    I found shiritaki noodles at my local supermarket, ShopRite, for $1.99 a package. Wegman’s also carries them for about the same price. Read the labels, though, as some of these noodles are filled with potato starch.

    Speaking of ShopRite, the one near my sister has a salad bar, including one with a variety of salads based around olives. One in particular that is awesome and easy to make yourself (why pay $7/lbs.?) is olives and feta cheese marinated in olive oil.

    I love that ice cream recipe. I am considering a marriage of heavy cream and the butter roasted pecan recipe in Fat Fast. That has GOT to be incredible!

    Reply
  16. The Older Brother

    @ Merlin

    Are you using heavy cream for your sauce? Almost any recipe you see published uses milk, but I think that’s mainly due to fat-phobia.

    We can usually skip, or at least cut way back, on any thickeners that way.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  17. Erica

    I’ve also made a great cheese sauce from an alfredo sauce recipe, subbing cheddar for the Parmesan. Can’t wait to try the berry ice cream. I’ve been on a VLC, VHF eating plan since April 2nd. So far, so good. Carb creep had about done me in!

    Reply
  18. Phyllis Mueller

    The kelp noodles sound great, Tom. Would you mind posting the full list of ingredients (couldn’t find this on Amazon) so I can be sure I can eat them before ordering? Thanks (and I’ll be sure to order through your website).

    Reply
  19. Devin

    I’ve been enjoying that berry “ice cream” since I first started eating like a Fat Head. It’s been a life saver to beat sweet cravings or when my whole family is making ice cream sundaes and I feel the temptation to join them. Delicious, satisfying, and healthy.

    Reply
  20. Firebird

    I tried the recipes in the Fat Fast Cookbook and they were awesome! I tried my mom’s old recipe for spaghetti with ricotta cheese (a side dish she use to make with chicken parmesan), which was my favorite meal. it worked beautifully…ricotta cheese, butter, salt and pepper. Super easy.

    I found shiritaki noodles at my local supermarket, ShopRite, for $1.99 a package. Wegman’s also carries them for about the same price. Read the labels, though, as some of these noodles are filled with potato starch.

    Speaking of ShopRite, the one near my sister has a salad bar, including one with a variety of salads based around olives. One in particular that is awesome and easy to make yourself (why pay $7/lbs.?) is olives and feta cheese marinated in olive oil.

    I love that ice cream recipe. I am considering a marriage of heavy cream and the butter roasted pecan recipe in Fat Fast. That has GOT to be incredible!

    Reply
  21. The Older Brother

    @ Merlin

    Are you using heavy cream for your sauce? Almost any recipe you see published uses milk, but I think that’s mainly due to fat-phobia.

    We can usually skip, or at least cut way back, on any thickeners that way.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  22. Erica

    I’ve also made a great cheese sauce from an alfredo sauce recipe, subbing cheddar for the Parmesan. Can’t wait to try the berry ice cream. I’ve been on a VLC, VHF eating plan since April 2nd. So far, so good. Carb creep had about done me in!

    Reply
  23. Phyllis Mueller

    The kelp noodles sound great, Tom. Would you mind posting the full list of ingredients (couldn’t find this on Amazon) so I can be sure I can eat them before ordering? Thanks (and I’ll be sure to order through your website).

    Reply
  24. Rae F.

    That sauce sounds amazing. And I bet eggs and bacon could easily be added to make it carbonara!

    I haven’t tried that combination, but it sounds good.

    Reply
  25. Rae F.

    That sauce sounds amazing. And I bet eggs and bacon could easily be added to make it carbonara!

    I haven’t tried that combination, but it sounds good.

    Reply
  26. K2

    Hi Tom,

    Thanks for continuing to share delish looking recipes. I tend to bookmark these in my recipe file for future use. 🙂

    I make a similar “ice cream.” Very similar, in fact. I allow frozen berries to slightly (maybe halfway?) thaw in the fridge, put them in a food processor, add whatever amount of cream I want (sometimes I prefer more berry to cream and vice versa) and a touch of sweetener, only occasionally. Whirl a bit and you have creamy, smooth berry ice cream. I have used single berries – blue-, rasp-, straw- and blackberry, a mix of berries, and even peach (heaven with a touch of vanilla added in!). I have even got my parents hooked on it as a quick, low-er carb dessert.

    I look forward to more recipes and farm reports. I know you are busy prepping for the cruise, but as always, I look forward to whatever you can post.

    Take care.

    Thank you.

    Reply
  27. Lars

    I’m making the berry ice cream first chance I get.
    I’ve also drizzled melted butter on frozen blueberries.
    Very tasty.

    Reply
  28. K2

    Hi Tom,

    Thanks for continuing to share delish looking recipes. I tend to bookmark these in my recipe file for future use. 🙂

    I make a similar “ice cream.” Very similar, in fact. I allow frozen berries to slightly (maybe halfway?) thaw in the fridge, put them in a food processor, add whatever amount of cream I want (sometimes I prefer more berry to cream and vice versa) and a touch of sweetener, only occasionally. Whirl a bit and you have creamy, smooth berry ice cream. I have used single berries – blue-, rasp-, straw- and blackberry, a mix of berries, and even peach (heaven with a touch of vanilla added in!). I have even got my parents hooked on it as a quick, low-er carb dessert.

    I look forward to more recipes and farm reports. I know you are busy prepping for the cruise, but as always, I look forward to whatever you can post.

    Take care.

    Thank you.

    Reply
  29. Lars

    I’m making the berry ice cream first chance I get.
    I’ve also drizzled melted butter on frozen blueberries.
    Very tasty.

    Reply
  30. mezzo

    I tried the tagliatelle shirataki noodles and they were really good. But – they are also quite expensive. Not as bad as the kelp noodles though – I looked them up and almost had a heart attack – one pack (2 helpings) sells at 12 Euros plus postage – the total comes to 15 Euros – that is about 19 USD at today’s exchange rate….that buys a lot of prime quality steak.

    Yeesh, they’re nowhere nearly that expensive here.

    Reply
  31. smgj

    I’ll just add that half-thawed banana (frosen in bites) mixed in a food processor make a very nice “soft ice”… You may also add some raw 100% coco powder to the mix or some blueberries afterward.

    Reply
  32. mezzo

    I tried the tagliatelle shirataki noodles and they were really good. But – they are also quite expensive. Not as bad as the kelp noodles though – I looked them up and almost had a heart attack – one pack (2 helpings) sells at 12 Euros plus postage – the total comes to 15 Euros – that is about 19 USD at today’s exchange rate….that buys a lot of prime quality steak.

    Yeesh, they’re nowhere nearly that expensive here.

    Reply
  33. smgj

    I’ll just add that half-thawed banana (frosen in bites) mixed in a food processor make a very nice “soft ice”… You may also add some raw 100% coco powder to the mix or some blueberries afterward.

    Reply
  34. ruth

    I bought some whipping cream today to try the ice cream, and it was amazing! Thanks for the tip.

    I think Americans have more options when buying cream than we have in Canada. Whipping cream at 35% butterfat is the heaviest cream we can buy. The other options are 18%, 10%, and 5%, and that’s it for choices.

    Reply
  35. ruth

    I bought some whipping cream today to try the ice cream, and it was amazing! Thanks for the tip.

    I think Americans have more options when buying cream than we have in Canada. Whipping cream at 35% butterfat is the heaviest cream we can buy. The other options are 18%, 10%, and 5%, and that’s it for choices.

    Reply
  36. Natalia

    thanks tom! would have never found kelp noodles without you! just put them in a curry that i made and they’re awesome!

    Reply
  37. Natalia

    thanks tom! would have never found kelp noodles without you! just put them in a curry that i made and they’re awesome!

    Reply
  38. srparish

    I’ve found that adding a raw egg or two into a blender with a cup or so of heaving whipping cream, a splash of vanilla, and a handful of frozen berries results in something nicely replacing ice cream. The egg really helps give it a texture much like ice cream.

    Reply
  39. srparish

    I’ve found that adding a raw egg or two into a blender with a cup or so of heaving whipping cream, a splash of vanilla, and a handful of frozen berries results in something nicely replacing ice cream. The egg really helps give it a texture much like ice cream.

    Reply
  40. Graybull

    “I guess it’s not just the USDA that’s essentially a division of Monsanto. ”

    Love it……of course you understand that comedy is when hitting very close to home.

    If it didn’t hang a ring of truth, it wouldn’t be funny.

    Reply
  41. Graybull

    “I guess it’s not just the USDA that’s essentially a division of Monsanto. ”

    Love it……of course you understand that comedy is when hitting very close to home.

    If it didn’t hang a ring of truth, it wouldn’t be funny.

    Reply
  42. Kerstin

    I know I am late to the rest of the comments – but I just tried the sauce with the kelp noodles – love the sauce! Not sure yet about the noodles – don’t see me selling my son on them – but I do see me making the sauce again to serve on broccoli or other veggies. I also make a spinach/salmon dish – I think this sauce would work on there as well (put spinach in dish, place salmon on top, then cover with a cream sauce and bake at 300 for 30 minutes to cook the salmon)…

    Thanks to you and Chareva for the delicious recipe!

    We use the same sauce on spaghetti squash.

    Reply
    1. Kerstin

      Ahhh, if I could persuade my son that spaghetti squash is a good alternative to noodles, I would have it made. But considering how far he’s come, this is a small fight – and I think broccoli and cauliflower and other veggies will be excellent with it too!

      It’s good on almost anything.

      Reply
  43. Kerstin

    I know I am late to the rest of the comments – but I just tried the sauce with the kelp noodles – love the sauce! Not sure yet about the noodles – don’t see me selling my son on them – but I do see me making the sauce again to serve on broccoli or other veggies. I also make a spinach/salmon dish – I think this sauce would work on there as well (put spinach in dish, place salmon on top, then cover with a cream sauce and bake at 300 for 30 minutes to cook the salmon)…

    Thanks to you and Chareva for the delicious recipe!

    We use the same sauce on spaghetti squash.

    Reply
    1. Kerstin

      Ahhh, if I could persuade my son that spaghetti squash is a good alternative to noodles, I would have it made. But considering how far he’s come, this is a small fight – and I think broccoli and cauliflower and other veggies will be excellent with it too!

      It’s good on almost anything.

      Reply

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