This Is What We’re Up Against, Part Two

      170 Comments on This Is What We’re Up Against, Part Two

The following is a transcript of an online debate between me and someone who works at a medical center and is either a nutritionist or has great respect for the advice they dole out.  This should give you an idea of what sick people are being told about diet.  My mom received the same advice from a nutrionist, but between my lectures and the books by Drs. Eades & Eades, she was persuaded otherwise.

Nutritionist comments are in italics, mine are plain text.

it’s not wise to cut grains out completely. your body needs varieties of different foods, grain included.

Humans lived without grains for 99% of their time on earth. Many native cultures still live without eating grains, which require processing to be edible. On what are you basing your claim that it’s “not wise” to cut out grains completely? (I have, and all that’s happened is several ailments have gone away.)

well good for your individual results. humans have been eating grains for at least 10,000 years, some evidence found it going way further back. granted it only seems like a blink of the eye, but it a significant amount of time nonetheless.

basically you need carbs to function. you need them for your brain and also to exercise. i’m not saying go out and eat a bunch of white bleached and enriched bread, just eat healthy grains.

Evolution doesn’t work that quickly. Some humans have adapted to grains, but many have not. No humans NEED grains to be healthy, and grains can have negative effects on health. The lectins in grains can lead to autoimmune diseases, to name just one. Nor do we need carbohydrates to exercise (I exercise frequently) or for brain function (I write, do standup comedy, and program software all without benefit of carbohydrates other than vegetables). Look up gluconeogenesis.

you actually do need carbs for lots of things, including the central nervous system, the kidneys, brain and muscles (including the heart). you need it cause it’s your main source of energy. without carbs your body will consume protein from your muscles. you also get carbs from fruit and veggies. and again, i’m not saying go eat a bunch of refined carbs, but brown rice, whole grain pasta, and multigrain breads should be a moderate part of your diet.

With all due respect, you’re simply stating an opinion with no facts to back it up. If you consume enough fat and protein, your body will not digest your muscles. I’ve gained quite a bit of muscle since cutting carbs. Carbs are the “main source of energy” as a matter of convenience in grain-growing societies, not as a biological necessity. Most of your body will happily burn fat for fuel — that’s why your body stores energy as fat. (Kind of makes sense, doesn’t it?)

your body will burn muscle and fat as a last resort, it’s a survival mechanism. and with all due respect, you don’t know my educational background, therefore are not qualified to call my opinion just that. an opinion, and with no facts nonetheless. i don’t know if you’re promoting this film for someone or if it’s your film, but arguing on youtube is not a good way to endorse a product.

What is your scientific basis for the “last resort” theory? Without fat or protein, you’ll die. Without carbs, you’ll live just fine, as many hunting and fishing tribes throughout history did. My ancestors lived in Ireland. Pre-agriculture, how did they manage to get all that “essential” carbohydrate? No potatoes, no grain farming, no wild fruits or vegetables except in season. The idea that we evolved to “need” grains and starches a mere few thousand years later is absurd.

it’s a well known medical fact in the order in which the body burns its resources. first carbs, then fat, then muscle. therefore, it’s a last resort. if you didn’t know that then i suggest you take a nutrition class.

Let’s see … biologically, we evolved to “need” foods that are new to the human diet, that were mostly unavailable before agriculture and transportation, and require extensive processing to be edible. (Try plucking wheat and eating it.) But the foods that were abundant and can be eaten immediately and raw — game meats and fish — are “last resort” sources of fuel, and our bodies chose a “last resort” form of storing calories, a.k.a. fat. Wow, evolution is strange indeed.

We burn carbs first to avoid the biological emergency of high blood sugar, which is toxic — therefore, it’s a survival mechanism — not because carbs are the body’s preferred fuel. If you didn’t know that, I suggest you take a biochemistry class.

[NOTE:  It occurred to me later that our bodies will burn alcohol before anything else.  According to the nutritionist’s logic, that makes alcohol our preferred fuel.  All in favor a 60% alcohol diet, raise your hands.]

funny, i always though eating meat raw was dangerous as well. believe what you must, but stop telling everyone to alter their diet when you’re obviously not a doctor nor a nutritionist.

Your lack of knowledge is becoming more apparent. Eating a fresh kill isn’t dangerous, and humans did it for ages. Bear Grylls does it on Man vs. Wild and lives to tell. Cooking provided an advantage by allowing meat to be kept longer without spoiling.

No, I’m not a doctor or a nutritionist, which is why I don’t offer lousy, unscientific, because-my-nutrition-textbook-­said-so advice such as “you need grains.” (Works for doctors … then they can prescribe arthritis drugs.)

“No, I’m not a doctor or a nutritionist” then stop pretending you know what people need. what works for you may not work for someone else.

Gosh, yes, because only a doctor — who is trained to prescribe drugs and spends a scant few hours in nutrition classes during all of medical school — can talk intelligently about nutrition. Certainly people who merely read dozens of books and hundreds of academic papers and regularly interview researchers aren’t qualified. As for not telling other people what to eat, you’re the one who felt compelled to encourage people to eat grains — which will make many of them ill.

but a nutritionist is specifically trained to be able to tell certain people how they should eat, unlike you who bunch everyone together and say no grain for you. asians are the healthiest people on earth, what is one of the staples in their diet? rice. hello. it’s a grain. if you would pay attention to what i said at the beginning you would understand that i’m not saying people should eat refined carbs, but veggies, fruits and beans, and whole wheat are needed in your diet.

Nutritionists are trained to follow the food pyramid, which isn’t based on science. It’s based on the USDA’s desire to sell grains.

Rice is the least problematic grain, but can still cause blood-sugar spikes for people whose ancestors didn’t come from rice-eating areas. Nobody “needs” rice or especially whole wheat, which can be disastrous. Read Loren Cordain’s paper on grains, lectins and diseases or Dr. William Davis’ posts on wheat … then tell me we need whole wheat.

they do not only follow the food pyramid, they use common sense. you wouldn’t give everyone 6-7 servings of grain. the USDA isn’t out to get us, neither are the majority of doctors and by encouraging people by saying eating tons of fast food isn’t bad for you is ridiculous. come work where i do at a dialysis center for one day and you’ll figure out why.

It isn’t common sense to promote a food pyramid with a base built on a food — grains — that cause health problems for many people. It isn’t common sense to tell people in a population where insulin resistance is rampant to consume 300 carbs per day. That’s partly why dialysis centers are necessary.

High blood sugar damages kidneys. High-carb diets spike blood sugar. The last thing people with kidney problems need is advice from carb-promoting nutritionists.

dialysis patients don’t need to limit grains, and some are encouraged because they need to gain weight. however, because of levels of phosphorus, whole wheat shouldn’t be consumed. but they’re encouraged to eat white, rye and sourdough bread. continue to argue if you must. it’s not the way to win customers.

So you encourage dialysis patients to eat white bread, a sure-fire way to spike blood sugar?!!  Lord help us.  Business must be booming.

white bread doesn’t have as much phosphorus, therefore better for them then whole wheat. again, don’t try to understand something you have no education in.

I see … because “don’t eat bread or other foods that raise your blood sugar” would kill them outright.

High blood sugar damages kidneys. White bread spikes blood sugar. Which part of this equation am I failing to understand because I did’t attend nutritionist school?

too much carbohydrates can result in high blood sugar levels, and too little can result in low blood sugar levels. you need to go to your nutritionist to see the amount you need. dialysis patients can’t eat a lot of foods as it is, so moderately eating white bread is needed to keep their weight up. that’s what you’re failing to understand.

Well, that make sense. After damaging their kidneys with foods that spike blood sugar, dialysis patients need white bread to raise their blood sugar and keep their weight up. And this therefore proves your original contention that all humans require grains in their diets, especially the whole grains that dialysis patients can’t eat because it would further damage their kidneys.

I stand corrected.


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170 thoughts on “This Is What We’re Up Against, Part Two

  1. Dan

    Haha. Some points.

    1. She said they get them to eat grains when they want them to put on weight.

    2. She loves trying to tell you you’re an uneducated fool as a way to claim she is right

    3. Apparently everyone needs to see a nutritionist to find out how much sugar they should be eating. Man how did we survive for the last two million years!!!! Staggering.

    4. You mention two doctors who agree with you but she doesn’t say a thing.

    Fair bit of cognitive dissonance happening there, I’d say.

    Reply
  2. Keith

    After some recent blood work, my doctor told me to cut back on fat, because my LDL was a tad high (I’m sure it was big and fluffy since my HDL and triglycerides were great). She also said I should cut back on carbs because my fasting blood sugar was 106 (an anomaly, probably because I worked out right before my appointment).

    So, she recommended a low-fat, low-carb diet. That leaves alcohol and protien as my main energy sources. When I got home, I had Guinness and eggs for breakfast.

    After reading your post, I think I finally see her logic.

    I’ve actually had that breakfast, but I was much younger at the time.

    Reply
  3. Your older brother

    There is of course the vested financial interest; and the visceral reaction of having your core beliefs challanged after spending so much time and money learning to parrot the “experts.”

    But think if you’re this person who seems to have deep expeirence with dialysis patients. Think of them thinking of the consequences for all of those people they advised to get “good carbs.” How could you possibly decide you’re wrong and still sleep?

    People tend to believe what they need to believe when they need to believe it.

    Cheers

    Absolutely. No one wants to face the possiblity that he or she has been harming people all these years.

    Reply
  4. Xenya

    oh me oh my. I am a nutritionist… well studying to be one. and it’s people like that make me ashamed to be in the industry. hopefully she is a dietitian and not an actual nutritionist. there is a difference!!!
    I would recommended for this person to go back to Biochemistry and Physiology class once again. Perhaps review digestive system. re-read protein synthesis. look into lectins. come up with stronger arguments and not use “uhm, hello” when disputing with a grown adult. Perhaps get enough knowledge to support your view with something other then “carbs are used first, then fat then protein. grains are good” over and over again.

    In a nutshell: uhm hello, grains are bad. Asians are not the healthiest, that’s a myth. China faces a diabetic epidemic. you know what’s the most common cause of death in China and Japan? uhm hello, Cerebro-vascular disease. that’s fancy for stroke. esophagus, stomach and liver cancer rates are way higher in China then US.
    I would keep going, but i’m late for my nutritional biochemistry class.

    Glad to know people who get it are also becoming nutritionists.

    Reply
  5. Hilary Kyro

    Yes, Tom, do call yourself a Decent Nutritionist For a Change! Every time I hear the phrase “wholesome wheat” or “artery-clogging egg”, I feel I must use the phrase “Double-chinned Dietician sitting at a desk slugging a Diet Coke and nibbling a mmmmmuffin”. -Now, I understand why, I’ve got FRM; furious rebuttal mode. ThanKs TOM!

    We should careful about naming it; that means a drug will soon be developed.

    Reply
  6. Jakounezumi

    “dialysis patients don’t need to limit grains, and some are encouraged because they need to gain weight”

    To me that statement is the equivalent of a smoking gun, wouldn’t you say? ENCOURAGED TO EAT GRAINS BECAUSE THEY NEED TO GAIN WEIGHT.
    Grains, not fat. The little buggers know, they know and they blame fat anyway.

    Yee-up. Unless they’re not supposed to consume fat, I’d say that says it all.

    Reply
  7. Jonathan

    Most people view their parents as infallible gods, usually until one faithful day when they realize they are just human like everyone else. This “nutritionist” must be holding her school teachers and text books in the same position. Her view will break one day and the truth will set in. (Hopefully a good chance since she looks under 20 years old and has videos of cats and the Sims on her page)

    And what is so important about making it whole grain. We need the fiber? Ugh… Soluble fiber… that gets broken down by gut flora into fatty acids, right? Un-soluble fiber… that turns into vitamin rich poo! Throw in some gluten and useless starch and, BOY, sounds really needed to me! Give me some bacon instead thank you very much.

    In retrospect, it was to my advantage that I had a couple of professors in college who I’m reasonably sure were idiots. It snapped me out of professor-awe at a young age.

    Reply
  8. Bill Pairaktaridis

    I think this is a growing concern completely unrelated with Paleo, Primal or whatever. This is a problem of the people that are responsible for the health and well-being of other human beings not being educated in nutrition and the effects on people. You can pretty safely say that once a doctor is through with med school, that’s it. They know what they know and they’ll retire with 40 year old knowledge. And I know very very few nutritionists that are willing to study the research that just might prove them wrong. And trust me. You won’t find them on the net. Bad publicity. So, we have to do something about this global phenomenon. We either start researching ourselves or we need to get our doctors to wise up and study a freaking medical journal. But then again, when medicine companies’ interests are in play things get murky at best. I’m facing this problem with trying to get my father to get off the statins. Even if he’s completely healthy, I still think that his doctor won’t take him off them…

    We have to do the research and spread the word ourselves. It won’t come from government, and it won’t come from the AMA, AHA, or ADA. We’re lucky to live in the digital/internet age, where we don’t depend on small clique of gatekeepers when seeking information.

    Reply
  9. Dana Carpender

    Re the textbook syndrome: I learned at an early age that not everything in books, even reference books, was right. How? We had my mom’s 1940s vintage World Book. The article on “space” included the sentence “Someday man may even go to outer space.” Since it was the heyday of the space program, that leapt out at us as patently hilarious.

    And, yes, I have to agree that I automatically discount by at least 50% anything written by people who can’t punctuate and capitalize. I’m a little nicer about spelling, since my intelligent sister is a poor-ish speller. But mix up “there,” “their,” and “they’re,” and I’ll have dark thoughts about your education. Oh, and the two that drive me insane, as a person writing about low carb weight control: People who say they want to “loose” weight (Loose it on whom? Sounds alarming!) and people who refer to the “Adkins diet.” Argh.

    My highly-intelligent wife was dyslexic as a youth and thus has problems with spelling now and then, so I’ve learned to be less judgmental about that one. But her grammar is excellent and she doesn’t make illogical arguments, which is what the nutritionist was doing.

    Reply
  10. Dana Carpender

    “Don’t try to understand something you have no education in”. That pretty much says it all don’t you think?

    At the very least it tells me he/she couldn’t construct the sentence to read “Don’t try to understand something in which you have no education.” But then, I’m a horrible snob about such things.

    That makes us kindred spirits.

    Reply
  11. Sarah

    I have an acquaintance who decided to become a nutritionist. When she first started school, she was remarkably open to the low carb concept. After her instructors got finished with her, she started pushing carbs with the fervor of a drug dealer. We no longer discuss nutrition since I embarrassed her in front of a room full of co-workers while she was pimping “whole grain bread”. I said: You know, it’s just sugar in the end, right? Didn’t your instructors teach you what happens when bread meets gut?

    Sorry to hear she went over to the dark side.

    Reply
  12. Leta

    The more I read this blog, the luckier I feel for having the truly amazing nutrition teachers that I had. The closest either of them ever came to advocating the starch-at-the-bottom-food-pyramid was to say that the proportion of macronutrients in a healthy diet should be roughly equal. (33% carbohydrate, 33% protein, 33% fat) While that certainly isn’t low carb, it’s not low fat, either, and such advice has served me pretty well.

    They also said that the preferred source for carbohydrate is (whole) vegetables, followed closely by (whole) fruit.

    Both were bothered by the moniker “low carb”, and thought “low starch” was a better name.

    Both compared white flour to sugar constantly.

    Two people, unknown to each other, unaffiliated institutions. I think I was damn lucky.

    Based on what we hear from so many nutritionists, I’d agree. You were lucky.

    Reply
  13. Greg

    Low blood sugar a bad thing? Only if you don’t have high FFA to replace them. Haven’t nutritionists heard of advanced glycation?

    Probably not.

    Reply
  14. Debbie

    Wow, as Dr. Mike is fond of saying, Jesus wept.

    Funny how back in the mid-90s I began developing mysterious symptoms – was constantly nauseous, throwing up almost daily, feeling bloated. I went to multiple doctors and suffered many tests – abdominal CAT scan, GI-series, endoscopy… and basically nothing was found wrong with me, but Prilosec alleviated my symptoms, so the best the doctor could offer me was that I would probably need to stay on Prilosec for life.

    So isn’t it funny that the next year I discovered the Eadeses Protein Power? And I went on their diet and decided to do it essentially grain free, and *all* my symptoms were gone within a week! Yet I was very “diagnosed” with any sort of grain issue, so doctors to this day pooh pooh my results.

    Even though, at the same time, I was also so achy and creaky and arthritic I could barely get out of bed in the morning, and thought it was all just part of “getting old” – so imagine my surprise when the aches and pains all went away too when I went wheat-free! Hmmm.

    Grains are a disaster for many people. The sound engineer for Fat Head was inspired to stop eating grains and, like you, was able to give up the Prilosec.

    Reply
  15. christian

    Love your site but one point. If a person is on dialysis their kidneys are shot….period. It is really irrelevant what might harm their kidneys at this point. They can not excrete waste hence the reason they are in dialysis to remove the waste. Average life expectancy, if you want to call it a life, is 3-5 years. Getting a line on them in the ER is next to impossible and from what I have seen not one is about to be mistaken for an anorexic. Their diets have been poopoo for a long long time.

    That’s a fair point. But I can’t believe white bread is necessary in anyone’s diet.

    Reply
  16. Jakounezumi

    “dialysis patients don’t need to limit grains, and some are encouraged because they need to gain weight”

    To me that statement is the equivalent of a smoking gun, wouldn’t you say? ENCOURAGED TO EAT GRAINS BECAUSE THEY NEED TO GAIN WEIGHT.
    Grains, not fat. The little buggers know, they know and they blame fat anyway.

    Yee-up. Unless they’re not supposed to consume fat, I’d say that says it all.

    Reply
  17. tina

    I love this blog! For my failure to thrive son, I was told to give him whole fat milk and carnation instant breakfast and I did so for a year – he didn’t weight. The same ped. told me to give him mac and cheese – all kids love mac and cheese he said.

    I’ve since done the WAP diet with raw diary. He gained inches but no weight. We’ve been doing GAPS diet for almost 8 months – he’s gained weight and looks REALLY healthy although he’s still really tiny for his age.

    Until a few weeks ago, I thought we’d introduce grains back into our diet eventually. I now realize that there’s no reason for grains whatsoever and we will not be introducing them back into our diet. I also understand from the Fiber Menace that fiber is harmful to the digestive tract! We eat pastured meats and eggs, fish, organic produce, coconut oil, butter, virgin red palm oil, lard, tallow and ghee. We don’t do dairy (except for ghee) but I will add it back into our diet at some point, raw of course.

    I just ordered your movie yesterday from Amazon (netflix doesn’t rent it anymore) and I’m excited to have my husband watch it! He’s been doing no grains for a week or so but only because I make every meal for him. Now, I need him to understand why grains and fiber are bad.

    I appreciate your blog and the time it takes you to write the posts.

    I appreciate you reading the blog as well.

    Reply
  18. Walter

    Absolutely. No one wants to face the possiblity that he or she has been harming people all these years.

    I agree that is a major reason why many will not change course. Those that do after taking a public position are to be applauded.

    That’s why I applaud Andrew Weil.

    Reply
  19. Bill Pairaktaridis

    I think this is a growing concern completely unrelated with Paleo, Primal or whatever. This is a problem of the people that are responsible for the health and well-being of other human beings not being educated in nutrition and the effects on people. You can pretty safely say that once a doctor is through with med school, that’s it. They know what they know and they’ll retire with 40 year old knowledge. And I know very very few nutritionists that are willing to study the research that just might prove them wrong. And trust me. You won’t find them on the net. Bad publicity. So, we have to do something about this global phenomenon. We either start researching ourselves or we need to get our doctors to wise up and study a freaking medical journal. But then again, when medicine companies’ interests are in play things get murky at best. I’m facing this problem with trying to get my father to get off the statins. Even if he’s completely healthy, I still think that his doctor won’t take him off them…

    We have to do the research and spread the word ourselves. It won’t come from government, and it won’t come from the AMA, AHA, or ADA. We’re lucky to live in the digital/internet age, where we don’t depend on small clique of gatekeepers when seeking information.

    Reply
  20. Dana Carpender

    Re the textbook syndrome: I learned at an early age that not everything in books, even reference books, was right. How? We had my mom’s 1940s vintage World Book. The article on “space” included the sentence “Someday man may even go to outer space.” Since it was the heyday of the space program, that leapt out at us as patently hilarious.

    And, yes, I have to agree that I automatically discount by at least 50% anything written by people who can’t punctuate and capitalize. I’m a little nicer about spelling, since my intelligent sister is a poor-ish speller. But mix up “there,” “their,” and “they’re,” and I’ll have dark thoughts about your education. Oh, and the two that drive me insane, as a person writing about low carb weight control: People who say they want to “loose” weight (Loose it on whom? Sounds alarming!) and people who refer to the “Adkins diet.” Argh.

    My highly-intelligent wife was dyslexic as a youth and thus has problems with spelling now and then, so I’ve learned to be less judgmental about that one. But her grammar is excellent and she doesn’t make illogical arguments, which is what the nutritionist was doing.

    Reply
  21. Dana Carpender

    “Don’t try to understand something you have no education in”. That pretty much says it all don’t you think?

    At the very least it tells me he/she couldn’t construct the sentence to read “Don’t try to understand something in which you have no education.” But then, I’m a horrible snob about such things.

    That makes us kindred spirits.

    Reply
  22. Sarah

    I have an acquaintance who decided to become a nutritionist. When she first started school, she was remarkably open to the low carb concept. After her instructors got finished with her, she started pushing carbs with the fervor of a drug dealer. We no longer discuss nutrition since I embarrassed her in front of a room full of co-workers while she was pimping “whole grain bread”. I said: You know, it’s just sugar in the end, right? Didn’t your instructors teach you what happens when bread meets gut?

    Sorry to hear she went over to the dark side.

    Reply
  23. Leta

    The more I read this blog, the luckier I feel for having the truly amazing nutrition teachers that I had. The closest either of them ever came to advocating the starch-at-the-bottom-food-pyramid was to say that the proportion of macronutrients in a healthy diet should be roughly equal. (33% carbohydrate, 33% protein, 33% fat) While that certainly isn’t low carb, it’s not low fat, either, and such advice has served me pretty well.

    They also said that the preferred source for carbohydrate is (whole) vegetables, followed closely by (whole) fruit.

    Both were bothered by the moniker “low carb”, and thought “low starch” was a better name.

    Both compared white flour to sugar constantly.

    Two people, unknown to each other, unaffiliated institutions. I think I was damn lucky.

    Based on what we hear from so many nutritionists, I’d agree. You were lucky.

    Reply
  24. Debbie

    Wow, as Dr. Mike is fond of saying, Jesus wept.

    Funny how back in the mid-90s I began developing mysterious symptoms – was constantly nauseous, throwing up almost daily, feeling bloated. I went to multiple doctors and suffered many tests – abdominal CAT scan, GI-series, endoscopy… and basically nothing was found wrong with me, but Prilosec alleviated my symptoms, so the best the doctor could offer me was that I would probably need to stay on Prilosec for life.

    So isn’t it funny that the next year I discovered the Eadeses Protein Power? And I went on their diet and decided to do it essentially grain free, and *all* my symptoms were gone within a week! Yet I was very “diagnosed” with any sort of grain issue, so doctors to this day pooh pooh my results.

    Even though, at the same time, I was also so achy and creaky and arthritic I could barely get out of bed in the morning, and thought it was all just part of “getting old” – so imagine my surprise when the aches and pains all went away too when I went wheat-free! Hmmm.

    Grains are a disaster for many people. The sound engineer for Fat Head was inspired to stop eating grains and, like you, was able to give up the Prilosec.

    Reply
  25. fyrespryte

    You know, I’m studying to be a nutritionist as well and the more I hear from people like this, and the more I learn about the poor science that has come from nutritional researches, I really fear the rest of my education. My plan has been to become a dietitian, credentialed through the ADA, but it requires an internship. I can’t imagine that I’m going to be able to make it through the program, believing what I do about nutrition. I recently sent a list of informative blogs/websites to one of my nutrition teachers and hadn’t really noticed until just then that the majority of the most informative ones are from people who aren’t even nutritionists by trade. One of them is a veterinarian! It kind of makes me doubt whether or not this is the direction that I should be going in. I wonder if people like me, and your first commenter can really make a difference in the field by wading into it.

    Thanks for all your hard work!

    I hope you can make a difference. Perhaps as more people who are truly interested in the science (as opposed to parroting the textbook advice) go into the field, we’ll see some meaningful changes.

    Reply
  26. Ellen

    I’m taking nutrition classes and I’m far into the second “advanced” class which is based on a book called Understanding Normal and Clinical nutrition, and it’s written by 3 registered dietitians.. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve said out loud “that is a lie” while reading this book. It is truly astonishing – everything your dietitian writer was spouting is echoed in this book. I think after this class, I’m done. I’m just glad I did my own research, learned from my own experiences , and knew what the truth is before beginning these classes.

    I understand now how dietitians are created and believe what they believe. The lies are said over and over again again in this book.. especially the one about needing carbs and the one about registered dietitians being the only “trained” experts in nutritional advice.

    Someone sent me quotes from a college textbook used in nutrition classes awhile back. Can’t remember the details, but the dietary recommendations on one page were contradicted by the biochemistry explained on a previous page.

    Reply
  27. christian

    Love your site but one point. If a person is on dialysis their kidneys are shot….period. It is really irrelevant what might harm their kidneys at this point. They can not excrete waste hence the reason they are in dialysis to remove the waste. Average life expectancy, if you want to call it a life, is 3-5 years. Getting a line on them in the ER is next to impossible and from what I have seen not one is about to be mistaken for an anorexic. Their diets have been poopoo for a long long time.

    That’s a fair point. But I can’t believe white bread is necessary in anyone’s diet.

    Reply
  28. tina

    I love this blog! For my failure to thrive son, I was told to give him whole fat milk and carnation instant breakfast and I did so for a year – he didn’t weight. The same ped. told me to give him mac and cheese – all kids love mac and cheese he said.

    I’ve since done the WAP diet with raw diary. He gained inches but no weight. We’ve been doing GAPS diet for almost 8 months – he’s gained weight and looks REALLY healthy although he’s still really tiny for his age.

    Until a few weeks ago, I thought we’d introduce grains back into our diet eventually. I now realize that there’s no reason for grains whatsoever and we will not be introducing them back into our diet. I also understand from the Fiber Menace that fiber is harmful to the digestive tract! We eat pastured meats and eggs, fish, organic produce, coconut oil, butter, virgin red palm oil, lard, tallow and ghee. We don’t do dairy (except for ghee) but I will add it back into our diet at some point, raw of course.

    I just ordered your movie yesterday from Amazon (netflix doesn’t rent it anymore) and I’m excited to have my husband watch it! He’s been doing no grains for a week or so but only because I make every meal for him. Now, I need him to understand why grains and fiber are bad.

    I appreciate your blog and the time it takes you to write the posts.

    I appreciate you reading the blog as well.

    Reply
  29. Walter

    Absolutely. No one wants to face the possiblity that he or she has been harming people all these years.

    I agree that is a major reason why many will not change course. Those that do after taking a public position are to be applauded.

    That’s why I applaud Andrew Weil.

    Reply
  30. fyrespryte

    You know, I’m studying to be a nutritionist as well and the more I hear from people like this, and the more I learn about the poor science that has come from nutritional researches, I really fear the rest of my education. My plan has been to become a dietitian, credentialed through the ADA, but it requires an internship. I can’t imagine that I’m going to be able to make it through the program, believing what I do about nutrition. I recently sent a list of informative blogs/websites to one of my nutrition teachers and hadn’t really noticed until just then that the majority of the most informative ones are from people who aren’t even nutritionists by trade. One of them is a veterinarian! It kind of makes me doubt whether or not this is the direction that I should be going in. I wonder if people like me, and your first commenter can really make a difference in the field by wading into it.

    Thanks for all your hard work!

    I hope you can make a difference. Perhaps as more people who are truly interested in the science (as opposed to parroting the textbook advice) go into the field, we’ll see some meaningful changes.

    Reply
  31. Ellen

    I’m taking nutrition classes and I’m far into the second “advanced” class which is based on a book called Understanding Normal and Clinical nutrition, and it’s written by 3 registered dietitians.. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve said out loud “that is a lie” while reading this book. It is truly astonishing – everything your dietitian writer was spouting is echoed in this book. I think after this class, I’m done. I’m just glad I did my own research, learned from my own experiences , and knew what the truth is before beginning these classes.

    I understand now how dietitians are created and believe what they believe. The lies are said over and over again again in this book.. especially the one about needing carbs and the one about registered dietitians being the only “trained” experts in nutritional advice.

    Someone sent me quotes from a college textbook used in nutrition classes awhile back. Can’t remember the details, but the dietary recommendations on one page were contradicted by the biochemistry explained on a previous page.

    Reply
  32. Paolo (Italy)

    Don’t you ever think it’s all done on purpose to control population and limit problems for governments? It’s a fact that since dietary guidelines have been given to populations, no big revolutions have occured among western population.

    Last big revolutionary movement was in the 60s – 70s, then almost nothing (or, at least, nothing much relevant). In Italy we have the most corrupted government of the world and everybody seem happy about that…. young people lose their mind on drugs and videogames instead of shouting their anger. It’s very sad…

    Reply
  33. Walter

    Have to give him credit when he starts an article this way:

    This will not be an easy column to write. I am about to put down 1,200 words in support of a book that starts by attacking me and often returns to this sport. But it has persuaded me that I was wrong. More to the point, it has opened my eyes to some fascinating complexities in what seemed to be a black and white case.

    Reply
  34. Paolo (Italy)

    Don’t you ever think it’s all done on purpose to control population and limit problems for governments? It’s a fact that since dietary guidelines have been given to populations, no big revolutions have occured among western population.

    Last big revolutionary movement was in the 60s – 70s, then almost nothing (or, at least, nothing much relevant). In Italy we have the most corrupted government of the world and everybody seem happy about that…. young people lose their mind on drugs and videogames instead of shouting their anger. It’s very sad…

    Reply
  35. Dana Carpender

    Paolo, if you’re thinking conspiracy, I’d skate right past mind control — easier to do with cheap entertainment — and go to “How can we sell as many pharmaceuticals as possible?” If a cabal had deliberately set out to sell as many drugs as possible to as many people as possible, they could not have come up with a better plan than convincing people that their health depended on eating a low fat diet based on carbs, and swapping out animal fats for vegetable oils. The evil brilliance of it is that the harder people try to get well, the sicker they become — hence, all those ads with earnest-looking actors saying “I tried diet and exercise…”

    Reply
  36. BK Lawson

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes. I went low-carb, high-fat, high-protein. In 2009, I abandoned grains altogether. I do not take meds, I’ve kept 60 lbs. off, and I feel great. Chronic headaches, fatigue, bronchitis, sinus/ear infections, constipation, allergies, and overall flu-like feeling has cleared up. I have never taken a single pill (ie, metformin) or a single shot of insulin. It is AMAZING the change in my body by getting away from grains, especially wheat. 1 slice of low-carb wheat bread, and I feel like sh*t for two days. I find it amazing, also, that the ADA and AHA push high-carb and high-grain for the sole purpose of making money off of the suffering of their ‘victims.’ It’s common sense, if you have ANY form of diabetes, to avoid carbs – yet all we see is a commotion about fat and cholesterol. Amazing…

    Thank heavens you knew enough to ignore the nutritionists.

    Reply
  37. Walter

    Have to give him credit when he starts an article this way:

    This will not be an easy column to write. I am about to put down 1,200 words in support of a book that starts by attacking me and often returns to this sport. But it has persuaded me that I was wrong. More to the point, it has opened my eyes to some fascinating complexities in what seemed to be a black and white case.

    Reply
  38. Dana Carpender

    Paolo, if you’re thinking conspiracy, I’d skate right past mind control — easier to do with cheap entertainment — and go to “How can we sell as many pharmaceuticals as possible?” If a cabal had deliberately set out to sell as many drugs as possible to as many people as possible, they could not have come up with a better plan than convincing people that their health depended on eating a low fat diet based on carbs, and swapping out animal fats for vegetable oils. The evil brilliance of it is that the harder people try to get well, the sicker they become — hence, all those ads with earnest-looking actors saying “I tried diet and exercise…”

    Reply
  39. BK Lawson

    In 2006, I was diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes. I went low-carb, high-fat, high-protein. In 2009, I abandoned grains altogether. I do not take meds, I’ve kept 60 lbs. off, and I feel great. Chronic headaches, fatigue, bronchitis, sinus/ear infections, constipation, allergies, and overall flu-like feeling has cleared up. I have never taken a single pill (ie, metformin) or a single shot of insulin. It is AMAZING the change in my body by getting away from grains, especially wheat. 1 slice of low-carb wheat bread, and I feel like sh*t for two days. I find it amazing, also, that the ADA and AHA push high-carb and high-grain for the sole purpose of making money off of the suffering of their ‘victims.’ It’s common sense, if you have ANY form of diabetes, to avoid carbs – yet all we see is a commotion about fat and cholesterol. Amazing…

    Thank heavens you knew enough to ignore the nutritionists.

    Reply
  40. kib

    ROTFLMAO. Actually not, because a wheat-free, concentrated-sugar free, low carb diet has rid me of my excess “A” … it’s not the laughing that did it. Thank you for your perseverence in the face of idiocy.

    If you were a vegan, you could be rolling on the floor laughing your pelvis off.

    Reply
  41. kib

    ROTFLMAO. Actually not, because a wheat-free, concentrated-sugar free, low carb diet has rid me of my excess “A” … it’s not the laughing that did it. Thank you for your perseverence in the face of idiocy.

    If you were a vegan, you could be rolling on the floor laughing your pelvis off.

    Reply

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