The Compulsion To Move

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In a psychology class I took in college (during my brief stint as a psych major), there was a lecture on what determines our personalities.  One of the factors was what the professor called energy endowment.  Some people are born to be energetic and some aren’t.  Your energy level would certainly affect your personality.

I recall thinking at the time, Well, that explains a lot.  I’m not blessed with much of an energy endowment.  I wasn’t especially lazy or anything, you understand.  I went to my classes, I was diligent about my homework, and I worked as a waiter on weekends to make a few bucks.  But I didn’t crave physical activity.  I liked reading, playing in a band, and talking about every subject under the sun with my friends.  I was never the guy who said, “Hey, let’s go play football in park!”  Sometimes I did go play football in the park if other guys invited me, but I was kind of relieved when it was over and we all went to sit down in a pub.

Fast-forward 35 years …

The forecast for Saturday was rain all day.  Just as well … I knew Chareva and I wouldn’t be doing farm work together because she took Sara to a seminar for girls on math and science careers.  So I figured I’d spend the day indoors, working on my speech for the upcoming cruise.

As I was sitting at my desk and going over the speech, I noticed a ray of sunshine peeking through the window blinds.  Then I felt mild tension in my right calf.  I looked down to see my right foot inching towards the door.

“Excuse me, foot.  What do you think you’re doing?”

“It hasn’t rained all day.  I want to go out.”

“And do what, exactly?”

“Well, I’m a foot, so it would probably be something that involves walking, genius.”

Not wanting an angry foot on my hands, I gave in and played 18 holes of disc golf in the front pastures.  Then Alana and I took food and water to the chickens in the front pasture and collected the eggs.  Then we took food and water to both flocks of chickens in the back pasture.  Then we took food and water to the hogs.

Feeling I’d done right by the foot, I sat at my desk to go over the speech.

“You know, it’s still not raining.”

“Yes, I know.  The forecast was wrong.  Big surprise.”

“Well, I want to go back out.”

“But I have to—”

“You can always write later if it rains.”

Can’t argue with that logic.  So I went out and played another 18 holes of disc golf.  When I tried to take my shoes off to go inside, the right foot refused to let go of the leather.

“What now?  That’s 36 holes already!”

“I’m just negotiating on behalf of your arms.  They don’t talk much.”

“Well, what do they want?”

“Work.  I mean, real work.  Tossing those little discs around isn’t work.”

“Tell them Chareva is gone, and the next farm chore is stringing more fencing.  That’s a two-person job.”

“Hang on … They say the driveway could use more patching.”

“Well, yeah, now that you mention it …”

“You need to fill in the holes with rocks.  They like that idea.  Rocks are heavy.”

Chareva’s garden cart was full of tools, tarps, gloves, zip-ties and other items dumped in there in no apparent order, which means she planned it that way.   I decided not to mess with her system, even though the garden cart is good for hauling rocks.

So I took a big bucket down to the creek, which serves as my quarry when I need rocks.  For the next couple of hours, I scooped rocks and gravel from the creek into the bucket.  Then I hand-carried the loaded bucket from the creek, across the front pasture, and to the top of our driveway, making sure to switch arms so neither would feel left out.  Then I filled canyons and craters in the driveway with rocks and gravel.  When we get a few days with no rain in the forecast, I’ll mix up some Quikrete and pour it between and on top of the rocks.

The rain that had been forecast all day finally came.  My muscles were tired by then, so the foot and his silent companions didn’t complain when I went inside.

In Good Calories, Bad Calories, Gary Taubes wrote about what he calls the compulsion to move.  We see lean people who move around a lot and fat people who don’t, so we assume the lean people are lean because they’re active.

Taubes says that’s getting the causality backwards.  Lean people are lean because their bodies aren’t hormonally geared to store a disproportionate share of calories as fat.  When they eat, their bodies would rather burn the calories than store them – so they feel a compulsion to move.  Longitudinal studies have shown that despite what most people think, kids don’t sit around and then get fat.  They start getting fat first, then sit around more – because they’ve lost the compulsion to move.

I believe there is such a thing as an energy endowment and that it’s partly genetic.  Some people are born bouncy and stay bouncy.  Others, not so much.  But diet has to figure into it as well.  When I was college, hardly a day went by when I didn’t eat wheat.  Toast or cereal in the morning, a sandwich for lunch, noodles or a roll with dinner – heck, that’s just normal food, right?

Now I rarely touch wheat.  But when I do – like, say, for my very rare pizza indulgence – I can feel the difference the next day.  I lose my enthusiasm for physical activity.  I feel like I did back in the days when I believed I was born with a low energy endowment.

I don’t have that low energy endowment anymore.  I’m not the bouncy type and never will be.  But when the weekend rolls around, I feel a compulsion to move.


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77 thoughts on “The Compulsion To Move

  1. Tatertot

    If the desire to move is proof that a food is good for us, I submit honey. It makes you move. In fact, run. I’ve learned a lot about beekeeping in the past 10 days since getting my first hive. Lesson 1 – wear your protective gear (or run).

    Reply
  2. Tatertot

    If the desire to move is proof that a food is good for us, I submit honey. It makes you move. In fact, run. I’ve learned a lot about beekeeping in the past 10 days since getting my first hive. Lesson 1 – wear your protective gear (or run).

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Good luck, but I have no plans to raise bees. Stinging insects seem to find me extraordinarily attractive.

      Reply
  3. Sam

    Great article, Tom. I totally agree, since eating real food and lots of healthy fats (inspired by Fathead) i find it a lot harder to sit around at home. An evening gym session after a long day at work and then housework afterwards seems a lot easier than it did when i was eating a high proportion of junk carbohydrates.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Makes a huge difference. I can’t help but wonder what my energy level would have been like at age 25 if I’d known then what I know now.

      Reply
      1. Sam

        Selfishly im glad you didnt otherwise you wouldnt have made Fathead!. Im turning 32 soon and definitely have more consistent energy than i did in my mid twenties.

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          It might have been my fate to figure this out later in life so I’d be driven to tell others.

          Reply
    2. Firebird

      This hasn’t happened to me at all. I stopped rollerblading, going for walks and last summer I sold my bike (bulging disc in lower back, the bike bothered that).

      I lift heavy weights three x week and that’s pretty much it. I have no energy to do much else physically.

      Reply
  4. Becky

    I resemble your post! I think the compulsion to move is fueled in part by the fact that we spend so much less time actually eating than we did before. Very little grazing, snacking, mindless inhalation of food. But take away all that eating time, and we have to do SOMETHING, and often that means moving around.

    Reply
  5. Namu

    This very morning, as I walked to my workplace from the train station, I just started running. I didn’t explicitly mean to, I just did, it came on its own. There’s a 3 storeys flight of stairs on the way, I just ran it up. “Compulsion to move” describes it very aptly indeed.

    Reply
  6. Brianna

    There was a discussion on a fitness/nutrition forum a while back about whether or not fat people are fat because they’re lazy, and someone commented that of course fat people are just lazy! He knows this because he has never seen overweight people doing activities like paddle boarding and mountain climbing, and it’s because they’re lazy, not because things like paddle boarding and mountain climbing are freaking hard to do when you’re big.

    I was 300lbs my senior year in high school and I walked to school every day (morning, home for lunch, back to school, home after). It was only a 15 minute walk, but by the time I got to school I was exhausted, and would spend the rest of the morning sweaty and tired. Then I’d walk home for lunch, and back to school where I’d be tired and sweaty for the rest of the day. That hour a day walk never helped my weight. About once a month I had access to my grandmother’s car and I LOVED those days because i knew I could sit in school and not feel gross and tired. I wish I had more energy, but I just didn’t have any.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      I had a phone conversation once with Gary Taubes to discuss part of the script for Fat Head. He mentioned being at a school and seeing the gym teacher making a class of kids run. The skinny kids were running along, happy as clams. The couple of fat kids looked utterly miserable. Gary said the gym teacher probably thought he was doing the fat kids a favor, but to him, it looked like a mild form of torture.

      Reply
      1. Walter Bushell

        Mild?

        J. Stanton at Gnolls has a prescription with scientific backup at

        http://www.gnolls.org/3637/what-is-metabolic-flexibility-and-why-is-it-important-j-stantons-ahs-2013-presentation-including-slides/

        Basically it’s what we’ve known for a long time
        You can’t eat your way out of lack of exercise.
        You can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet.

        And I think some people may just be doomed.

        from other sources
        In addition the amino acid taurine my help get you
        moving if you’ve fallen into the pit of can’t exercise
        because I’m too fat.

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          Okay, not so mild. That’s one of many reasons I’m not a fan of the “Let’s Move!” campaign. If kids are in fat-storing mode and lack energy as a result, “Let’s Move!” is “Let’s Be Miserable!”

          Reply
        2. Galina L.

          You can have zero exercise and loose weight. It is what I experienced after a foot surgery on a very LC diet.

          Reply
          1. Walter Bushell

            OK. I cannot reach ideal weight without exercise. By extreme low carb eating I managed to get to where our host got by taking up low carb etcetera.

            100 pounds down but still at about 30% body fat and 40 — 50 pounds overweight. Starting at 290 pounds (131 kilos) at 5′ 4″ (1.6 meters)

            Reply
  7. Bruce

    I wonder if some of the problem for kids becoming overweight and starting a life of “huskiness”, is when kids are in school, teachers dislike fidgety kids.

    Reply
  8. Namu

    This very morning, as I walked to my workplace from the train station, I just started running. I didn’t explicitly mean to, I just did, it came on its own. There’s a 3 storeys flight of stairs on the way, I just ran it up. “Compulsion to move” describes it very aptly indeed.

    Reply
  9. Bruce

    I wonder if some of the problem for kids becoming overweight and starting a life of “huskiness”, is when kids are in school, teachers dislike fidgety kids.

    Reply
  10. Tom Welsh

    This effect may well have helped the ruling classes to maintain the upper hand back in medieval and ancient times. When the “agricultural revolution” kicked in 10,000 years ago or more, most people settled on farms and began raising crops. They ate most of their harvest, selling or trading the rest – except for the growing fraction that was taken in taxes. Now the people who took those taxes were kings and barons; and they probably didn’t eat grains like the peasants. I studied history, and everything I learned about the ancient and medieval world tells me that rulers enjoyed hunting and fishing – still popular upper-class pursuits in Europe, though more democratized in the New World. Having hunted all day, they came home, slung the carcasses at their cooks, had a bath and got changed for dinner. What was for dinner? Venison and other red game meats, pheasants and other game birds, wild fish, vegetables and fruit. Dessert? Not so much. Probably apples or pears – once a luxury – and some cheese.

    Those habits persist today. I went to a very up-market school, and at the time I didn’t understand why some of the more upper-class kids used to mock me for eating rice pudding, starchy cakes, and the like. Now I understand: they had been brought up to imitate their parents by eating the aristocratic diet. Not only was it healthier – it gave them lots of extra energy for hunting and (when the occasion demanded) smiting. Any peasants who tried to rebel had no chance against all that smokin’ meat energy!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Good point. Back when the low-fat diet craze began, I read an article that also described grains as “poor people food” for much of history — but guess what?!! Poor people food is actually good for you!! (So said the article.)

      Reply
      1. Walter Bushell

        Isn’t it a co in key dinky that the cheapest foods are the best for us??? Grains, beans, soy products , grain and bean oils.

        Behold! You can make processed food from them with tremendous markups and still undercut real food.

        Ever wonder what the markup on Calvin’s chocolate covered sugar bombs is?

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          As Denise Minger explained in her book “Death By Food Pyramid,” grains were declared health food partly because the guvmint wanted to expand the food-stamp program and grains are affordable.

          Reply
    2. JillOz

      In medieval England, if you were a peasant or serf, you were not allowed to kill or eat ‘The King’s Deer” on pain of death.

      Foods and clothes were determined on the basis of class.

      Reply
  11. Deb

    It took not only reducing my carb load but also some work on emotional eating to make a difference. I now feel there is a insistent 4 year old inside me somewhere saying, “OK, I don’t want this extra weight anymore and I’m done sitting, what are we gonna do to next to move?!”. What a difference of years of “white knuckling” it in regards to what I eat and forcing myself to go for a walk because I thought I should.

    Reply
    1. Tom Welsh

      Couldn’t agree more. I was brought up in various places, but my parents were both lowland Scots and I spent some time in the Clyde area. Talk about Doughnut City! Also scones, crumpets, pies, bridies (like Cornish pasties), and all sorts of cakes and biscuits. Every weekend I took my pocket money straight to the sweet shop to invest in chocolate, toffee, and ghastly chewy things that could have been designed specifically to destroy teeth.

      To this day, I feel the lure of all those grain-sugar-and-fat composites. The best way I have learned to deal with it to say to myself, “OK, you need to lose all this fat to reach a healthy weight. Just imagine you are fasting – easy enough to do on LCHF – then add in everything that’s absolutely vital, a bit at a time. First red meat. Then some good quality green vegetables. Then maybe some free-range poultry (preferably legs & thighs), salmon and other oily fish (not farmed), dairy (mostly heavy cream, aged cheese), and a smidgeon of fruit – which by now seems like a huge luxury. It’s a lot easier to forget about all the childhood “treats” when you never feel hungry!

      Reply
  12. Scooze

    So true. My skinny nieces have learned to tell their parents that they need to get their “ya-yas out” and go run around. I was one of those skinny kids and I remember being like that.

    Then the fat was removed from all of our food and I developed a mild sugar and carb addiction in my late 20s, gained 35 lbs and became sedentary for years. After seeing Fathead (because it was billed as a rebuttal to Supersize Me), I educated myself about health and nutrition, and have finally lost most of that weight again. I feel much better, but still don’t have the urge to move back just yet. I can’t wait.

    Reply
  13. Paul Eilers

    My mother fidgets while she is sitting down. She will have her legs crossed, and constantly moves her foot, up and down, up and down.

    She’ll then get up and adjust the lampshade, then sit back down.

    After that, she will get up and move the picture frame, then sit back down.

    Finally, after sitting maybe ten minutes, she will decide to clean up something in the house, or go outside and do some work in the yard.

    She is also thin as a rail. (And is not the healthiest of eaters.)

    Reply
  14. Waldo

    Great post! It reminds me of Dr. Robert Lustig’s explanation from Jimmy Moore’s first podcast with him (a top five favorite of all time). Dr. Lustig explained so articulately how leptin resistance causes this sloth phenomena. Eating SAD, being on the insulin roller coaster for many folks will eventually make your brain blind to leptin, the satiety and ‘its safe to burn energy’ hormone. When broke an over nourished body thinks its starving. When you’re starving (starving, not hungry), your body (the “elephant” part) wants to sit down and conserve. Synergistic to the second half of Fat Head and so on regarding the fat storage cartoons as well. A healthy leptin signal gets you moving!

    Reply
  15. Paul Eilers

    My mother fidgets while she is sitting down. She will have her legs crossed, and constantly moves her foot, up and down, up and down.

    She’ll then get up and adjust the lampshade, then sit back down.

    After that, she will get up and move the picture frame, then sit back down.

    Finally, after sitting maybe ten minutes, she will decide to clean up something in the house, or go outside and do some work in the yard.

    She is also thin as a rail. (And is not the healthiest of eaters.)

    Reply
  16. Armando

    I am currently reading “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and this exercise fad was created by a biochemist called Mayer. Time after time in lab test have shown that excersice does not make you lose weight, instead, it increases your appetite. Your success in losing weight relies on your diet. So ditching wheat, grains, and sugar and embracing fat and proteins has helped me lose weight. I also do not feel tired all time like I did with my grain, wheat, and sugar diet. I only eat twice a day and when I am finished excercising, I do not feel hungry afterwards. The reason I hated excercising in the past was because I use to crash all time(sugar levels dropped and would puke all the time), but not anymore. My doctor recommend me to do lchf, but your doco “fathead” made not think twice on doing lchf.

    Reply
  17. Erica

    I’m one of those who aren’t naturally bouncy. I did get some exercise as a kid, but I would rather have laid on the couch and read books all day. And sometimes did! A month ago on March 18th I gave up sugar and sucralose, and went low carb (meat, fat, veggies that grow above ground…I’m not actually counting carbs). I’d already given up aspartame/diet sodas. I lost 5 pounds and the craving for sugar. I drink my coffee with no sugar now. And I have more energy! I’m going up and down the stairs at work (and don’t have to drag myself up any more) and walking fast.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      Ain’t it funny how we have more energy when we don’t load up on what dieticians insist is “your main source of energy?”

      Reply
  18. Waldo

    Great post! It reminds me of Dr. Robert Lustig’s explanation from Jimmy Moore’s first podcast with him (a top five favorite of all time). Dr. Lustig explained so articulately how leptin resistance causes this sloth phenomena. Eating SAD, being on the insulin roller coaster for many folks will eventually make your brain blind to leptin, the satiety and ‘its safe to burn energy’ hormone. When broke an over nourished body thinks its starving. When you’re starving (starving, not hungry), your body (the “elephant” part) wants to sit down and conserve. Synergistic to the second half of Fat Head and so on regarding the fat storage cartoons as well. A healthy leptin signal gets you moving!

    Reply
  19. Armando

    I am currently reading “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and this exercise fad was created by a biochemist called Mayer. Time after time in lab test have shown that excersice does not make you lose weight, instead, it increases your appetite. Your success in losing weight relies on your diet. So ditching wheat, grains, and sugar and embracing fat and proteins has helped me lose weight. I also do not feel tired all time like I did with my grain, wheat, and sugar diet. I only eat twice a day and when I am finished excercising, I do not feel hungry afterwards. The reason I hated excercising in the past was because I use to crash all time(sugar levels dropped and would puke all the time), but not anymore. My doctor recommend me to do lchf, but your doco “fathead” made not think twice on doing lchf.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Nothing against exercise, of course. It’s great for health. But not for losing body fat.

      Reply
  20. Erica

    I’m one of those who aren’t naturally bouncy. I did get some exercise as a kid, but I would rather have laid on the couch and read books all day. And sometimes did! A month ago on March 18th I gave up sugar and sucralose, and went low carb (meat, fat, veggies that grow above ground…I’m not actually counting carbs). I’d already given up aspartame/diet sodas. I lost 5 pounds and the craving for sugar. I drink my coffee with no sugar now. And I have more energy! I’m going up and down the stairs at work (and don’t have to drag myself up any more) and walking fast.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Ain’t it funny how we have more energy when we don’t load up on what dieticians insist is “your main source of energy?”

      Reply
      1. Firebird

        My mom would take me to Olive Garden for a birthday lunch. I’d come home and want to do nothing but take a nap…all those bread sticks before the pasta laden main course.

        Back in July, my nephew’s hockey team played in a tournament and the team meal the first night of the tournament…at Olive Garden. The coaches forbade them to chow down on those same bread sticks and to doggy bag their meals and save all that pasta for after the game. They didn’t want the kids to get bogged down and crash in the middle of the game.

        Times have changed.

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          Coaches knew more than we thought. My high school’s wrestling coach also taught the health class. He told us if we wanted to lose weight, stop eating sugar, bread and potatoes for awhile. He didn’t say anything about cutting out the fat and eating our whole grains.

          Reply
          1. Walter Bushell

            My gym teacher told me that you only needed a little fat for lubrication.

            One day I got the wind knocked out of me and as I lay there in agony, the gym teacher said, “He only got the wind knocked out of him, no problem.”

            You don’t have to be a sadist to be a gym teacher, but it helps. Really they were hired to coach the football team and they had to have a teaching job on the side to get paid. It’s not like they could teach bonehead math, after all.

            Turned me off exercise for decades. Let’s face it
            a football coach should not be trying to make athletes out of the cubby and it won’t work unless the diet is addressed, as diet is far more important, but not enough.

            Reply
            1. Tom Naughton Post author

              Well, let’s not paint all coaches with the same brush. My high school’s football coach (who took the team to a few state-championship games) also taught the speech class. He was a very good teacher and I enjoyed the class very much.

            2. Firebird

              Yep, the head coach of my HS football team taught shop and I had him for two years of mechanical drawing, which is one of the few things I learned in HS that I actually applied in the real world. Asst. football coach taught chemistry. Men’s basketball coach taught English. One wrestling coach taught foreign languages and another taught math, as did the soccer coach. Girl’s tennis was coached by one of the history teachers.

  21. samc

    I was a very active kid, started gaining weight @ 13 y/o but stayed pretty active into my 20’s. After that I struggled with weight for the next 30 years until finally cutting out the grains, booze, sugar and processed foods. I probably would have never put on the weight at 13 if I was Paleo way back then. It is the crap industrialized food combined with the hormonal shifts of youth to teen.

    I have returned to my activeness, adjusted for age of course. Being a fat couch potato is not fun, at least for me.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      The onset of puberty seems to be when a lot of kids on bad diets start to get fat. That’s when I started getting fat, too.

      Dr. Michael Fox (a reproductive endocrinologist) gave a presentation on one of the low-carb cruises that explained why. It has to do with the dramatic shift in hormones that puberty triggers.

      Reply
  22. samc

    I was a very active kid, started gaining weight @ 13 y/o but stayed pretty active into my 20’s. After that I struggled with weight for the next 30 years until finally cutting out the grains, booze, sugar and processed foods. I probably would have never put on the weight at 13 if I was Paleo way back then. It is the crap industrialized food combined with the hormonal shifts of youth to teen.

    I have returned to my activeness, adjusted for age of course. Being a fat couch potato is not fun, at least for me.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      The onset of puberty seems to be when a lot of kids on bad diets start to get fat. That’s when I started getting fat, too.

      Dr. Michael Fox (a reproductive endocrinologist) gave a presentation on one of the low-carb cruises that explained why. It has to do with the dramatic shift in hormones that puberty triggers.

      Reply
  23. Sky King

    If I may…let me tell you about my own personal experience with being in great shape vs. being fat. I started working out with weights during my early teens. Later in my 20’s I became an amateur bodybuilder competing in city and state bodybuilding competitions. I also loved playing sports and played 2 sports (baseball and football) in H.S. and college. I had a ton of energy and tremendously enjoyed engaging in all types of physical endeavors.

    One day I slipped on some black ice stepping off a curb and ended up with a Potter’s fracture (broke my fibula and tore the tendons and ligaments in my ankle). I ended up in a cast, and on the sofa, for 6 months (It took me a full year before I was able to start working out again). The injury was that bad! During that time of recovery I just layed out on the sofa 24hrs/day while being looked after, and fed, by my well-intentioned mom. I ended up gaining over 40 lbs., which I’m sure was a lot more in fat since I lost a ton of muscle!

    During that time after I gained all that weight (fat) I can remember how absolutely miserable I was. Not only because of my new physical appearance compared to my bodybuilding days, but because of how quickly I became exhausted just from walking up a flight of stairs or from taking short walks. Just bending over to pick something up off the floor or to tie my shoes was very uncomfortable (I could feel the fat on my insides pushing up against my internal organs (heart and lungs) whenever I bent over).

    So, I can empathize with those who are overweight and appear to be “lazy”. It’s very physically exhausting, and it’s just human nature to want to avoid that which makes one feel very uncomfortable! I think once folks can get their weight back under control and within healthy numbers, then the energy will come. Thankfully, I made a full recovery and have never stopped working out and eating right. There’s just no way would I ever want to feel like that again!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      So you know how it feels. To make matters even worse, schools are determined to feed kids (including fat kids) low-calorie meals, THEN make them go out and run or whatever to lose weight.

      Reply
      1. Sky King

        Yeah, Michelle Obama’s childhood obesity initiative is never going to work. And thats what happens when politicians, or a politician’s wife in this case, believe themselves to be experts on nutrition and then consequently try to slam their beliefs down the American Public’s collective throats.

        Reply
  24. Sky King

    If I may…let me tell you about my own personal experience with being in great shape vs. being fat. I started working out with weights during my early teens. Later in my 20’s I became an amateur bodybuilder competing in city and state bodybuilding competitions. I also loved playing sports and played 2 sports (baseball and football) in H.S. and college. I had a ton of energy and tremendously enjoyed engaging in all types of physical endeavors.

    One day I slipped on some black ice stepping off a curb and ended up with a Potter’s fracture (broke my fibula and tore the tendons and ligaments in my ankle). I ended up in a cast, and on the sofa, for 6 months (It took me a full year before I was able to start working out again). The injury was that bad! During that time of recovery I just layed out on the sofa 24hrs/day while being looked after, and fed, by my well-intentioned mom. I ended up gaining over 40 lbs., which I’m sure was a lot more in fat since I lost a ton of muscle!

    During that time after I gained all that weight (fat) I can remember how absolutely miserable I was. Not only because of my new physical appearance compared to my bodybuilding days, but because of how quickly I became exhausted just from walking up a flight of stairs or from taking short walks. Just bending over to pick something up off the floor or to tie my shoes was very uncomfortable (I could feel the fat on my insides pushing up against my internal organs (heart and lungs) whenever I bent over).

    So, I can empathize with those who are overweight and appear to be “lazy”. It’s very physically exhausting, and it’s just human nature to want to avoid that which makes one feel very uncomfortable! I think once folks can get their weight back under control and within healthy numbers, then the energy will come. Thankfully, I made a full recovery and have never stopped working out and eating right. There’s just no way would I ever want to feel like that again!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      So you know how it feels. To make matters even worse, schools are determined to feed kids (including fat kids) low-calorie meals, THEN make them go out and run or whatever to lose weight.

      Reply
      1. Sky King

        Yeah, Michelle Obama’s childhood obesity initiative is never going to work. And thats what happens when politicians, or a politician’s wife in this case, believe themselves to be experts on nutrition and then consequently try to slam their beliefs down the American Public’s collective throats.

        Reply
  25. tony

    Many times when I have to do a project, I have a hard time starting. But once I start, it’s like somebody flips a switch on me and I wound up working like a madman. So much that after I finish, I start doing other things.

    On the other hand I’m always fired up when I start my workout (bp, dead and squat one set to failure in impeccable form, 1-2 times a week). However, after I’m finished I’ll be wasted for most of the rest of the day.

    Reply
  26. tony

    Many times when I have to do a project, I have a hard time starting. But once I start, it’s like somebody flips a switch on me and I wound up working like a madman. So much that after I finish, I start doing other things.

    On the other hand I’m always fired up when I start my workout (bp, dead and squat one set to failure in impeccable form, 1-2 times a week). However, after I’m finished I’ll be wasted for most of the rest of the day.

    Reply
  27. Paula

    i hesitate to even say this, but I’m going to put it out here anyway. I’m down 84 pounds from my all-time highest weight thanks to LCHF. Do I feel like moving more? An unexplained increase in energy? Nope. Not in the slightest. I still want to sit around, doing as little physical exertion as possible. Thankfully, I can do this because LC keeps me from gaining the weight back. But am I alone here? Is there something “wrong” with me? LOL!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      Good point about how the “all calories are the same” idea is being pushed by the makers of junk foods. Of course they want us to believe that. If all calories are the same, we can still drink our sugary sodas if we cut calories elsewhere.

      Reply
  28. Paula

    i hesitate to even say this, but I’m going to put it out here anyway. I’m down 84 pounds from my all-time highest weight thanks to LCHF. Do I feel like moving more? An unexplained increase in energy? Nope. Not in the slightest. I still want to sit around, doing as little physical exertion as possible. Thankfully, I can do this because LC keeps me from gaining the weight back. But am I alone here? Is there something “wrong” with me? LOL!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Good point about how the “all calories are the same” idea is being pushed by the makers of junk foods. Of course they want us to believe that. If all calories are the same, we can still drink our sugary sodas if we cut calories elsewhere.

      Reply

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