Speech: Science For Smart People

After a few days of hassling with Final Cut Pro (which I don’t like very much … Adobe Premiere is more user-friendly), I managed to get clear versions of my slides into the video of my speech. So here it is, Science For Smart People, the speech I gave on the low-carb cruise.

Dr. Michael Fox, one of the other speakers on the cruise, told me later he enjoyed the speech very much and thought I should be giving it in medical schools, but was concerned the section about the HERS estrogen trial might needlessly scare women away from taking hormones.  The estrogen women are given today isn’t the same kind used back then.  I asked him to explain on camera, so he did.  I included that interview at the end of the speech.

If you’d like a DVD copy after viewing, you can now order this speech or Big Fat Fiasco (or both) from this page. Since my wife and I are the shipping department, we’ve simplified things by charging a flat $14.99 for either DVD, shipping included, no extra charges for outside the U.S. You can also order both speeches on DVD for $24.99.

(Note to those of you outside the United States: we occasionally receive overseas orders for the Big Fat Fiasco DVD. No need to place that order. If you order the Fat Head international DVD, Big Fat Fiasco is already included as a bonus track.)


If you enjoy my posts, please consider a small donation to the Fat Head Kids GoFundMe campaign.
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147 thoughts on “Speech: Science For Smart People

  1. Firebird

    There are people out there like CarbSane that are shills who are paid to go onto websites and create the kind of chaos she does in order to discredit those who have an agenda other than hers (or her bosses — corn refiners?)

    I don’t think she’s a paid antagonist, but her obsession with Gary Taubes is just plain weird. It borders on pathological.

    Reply
  2. Susan

    Loved your presentation — great job as usual!

    But while I appreciate Dr. Fox’s point of view about hormones, he being a reproductive endocrinologist and all, I’m not so anxious to “take the estrogen,” as he puts it, no matter what the method of delivery.

    I’ve always felt that the bodies we are given are not meant to last forever. Things wear out — and I believe that’s a good thing. Otherwise, this old world could get mighty crowded.

    For me, it’s a matter of being healthy. I know someday my body will finally give out, but I’d rather not live, say, my final 20 years feeling weak and tired if I can feel good instead. If replacing a hormone my body is no longer producing would make the difference, I’d do it.

    Reply
  3. Chris

    I’m so glad that you do all the leg work of tracking down the studies and really explaining how journalists arrive at their “headlines” that regular people, including my former organic grain self, repeat as fact. I haven’t seen Big Fat Fiasco yet because it just came in the mail, and I loaned to my officemate who doubted the changes I learned from fat head until she witnessed me lose 20 lbs in 7 weeks, and more importantly, changed from being pretty crabby all the time to almost sweet. She decided this week to eat chicken sausages for breakfast instead of her HUGE bowl of melon and grapes. So when I got “Fathead” DVD with Big Fat Fiasco, I just loaned it right to her. I won’t see you on a cruise because my husband would be seasick, but we both appreciate the work you are doing and
    how LCHF has made life really good now.

    Nice of you to help educate a friend. I hope she learns something from it.

    Reply
  4. Ricardo

    There should of been a interview for Andropause at the end but other than that i really enjoyed that video think i check for any previous ones you might of done.

    No apologies for the grammar. I assume English isn’t your native tongue.

    Reply
  5. TonyNZ

    I’m gonna set this to download overnight to watch (rural internet is fail).

    Also, are you aware of this?

    I’d be optimistic that they might find that high carb = high weight = diabeetus from the results but I’m just picturing the headlines.

    Children on 10% fat diets obese. Current recommendations for fat intake are too high.

    Yes, I‘m preparing to express my outrage about that one.

    Reply
  6. Barry

    You answer comments this late? Good speech. Enjoyed it.

    My internet connection was down for much of the day.

    Reply
  7. Dalila

    Getting ready to watch your speech now, from all the comments, it’ll be enjoyable!

    In the meantime, I’ll leave this here:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_localdallas/20110513/ts_yblog_localdallas/protestors-ready-to-battle-heart-attack-grill-in-dallas

    Saw this on the news today. I understand the people sitting outside this place wanting to promote a “healthy lifestyle” but doing so by handing out apples? Hm. Not to mention it’s the same issue with Supersize Me: nobody is forcing these people to eat at this specific restaurant. Sure, it’s a strange concept but whoever came up with that marketing strategy is a genius. No doubt it’ll get people talking, though I can already imagine the fear/hate toward saturated fat and red meat in the comments (I wasn’t brave enough to venture into the comments section).

    The burgers look delicious. If only people would forego the bun, the fries and the Coke they drink it with…

    Exactly. Chomp on those big burgers without the bun, and you’ve got yourself a decent dinner. I believe they fry the french fries in lard too, which would almost make them worth eating.

    Reply
  8. TonyNZ

    I’m more in the “misguided numbskullery” than the “conspiracy to commit mass murder” camp, but that study in my previous comment just seems to be set up to explain away unwanted results.

    I’m afraid that happens all the time. If a study produces results the researchers don’t like, they’ll often conclude that the matter “requires further study.” In other words, we’ll try to re-design the study to produce the results we wanted.

    Reply
  9. Ricardo

    There should of been a interview for Andropause at the end but other than that i really enjoyed that video think i check for any previous ones you might of done.

    No apologies for the grammar. I assume English isn’t your native tongue.

    Reply
  10. TonyNZ

    I’m gonna set this to download overnight to watch (rural internet is fail).

    Also, are you aware of this?

    I’d be optimistic that they might find that high carb = high weight = diabeetus from the results but I’m just picturing the headlines.

    Children on 10% fat diets obese. Current recommendations for fat intake are too high.

    Yes, I‘m preparing to express my outrage about that one.

    Reply
  11. Barry

    You answer comments this late? Good speech. Enjoyed it.

    My internet connection was down for much of the day.

    Reply
  12. Dalila

    Getting ready to watch your speech now, from all the comments, it’ll be enjoyable!

    In the meantime, I’ll leave this here:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_localdallas/20110513/ts_yblog_localdallas/protestors-ready-to-battle-heart-attack-grill-in-dallas

    Saw this on the news today. I understand the people sitting outside this place wanting to promote a “healthy lifestyle” but doing so by handing out apples? Hm. Not to mention it’s the same issue with Supersize Me: nobody is forcing these people to eat at this specific restaurant. Sure, it’s a strange concept but whoever came up with that marketing strategy is a genius. No doubt it’ll get people talking, though I can already imagine the fear/hate toward saturated fat and red meat in the comments (I wasn’t brave enough to venture into the comments section).

    The burgers look delicious. If only people would forego the bun, the fries and the Coke they drink it with…

    Exactly. Chomp on those big burgers without the bun, and you’ve got yourself a decent dinner. I believe they fry the french fries in lard too, which would almost make them worth eating.

    Reply
  13. Stephen Taylor

    Thanks for this brilliantly presented educational and funny video.
    When I’m explaining about carbs to friends and colleagues, I constantly get the statement that this or that study says you should eat more eggs or less eggs.
    I explain it’s a study and A doesn’t necessarily lead to B.
    Now you have made this video, I can point them to it and hopefully they will understand the importance of real science and real food.

    Thanks again Tom

    Thanks for watching.

    Reply
  14. TonyNZ

    I’m more in the “misguided numbskullery” than the “conspiracy to commit mass murder” camp, but that study in my previous comment just seems to be set up to explain away unwanted results.

    I’m afraid that happens all the time. If a study produces results the researchers don’t like, they’ll often conclude that the matter “requires further study.” In other words, we’ll try to re-design the study to produce the results we wanted.

    Reply
  15. Firebird

    BTW, Tom, I am a professional editor (sports news for the most part) and I am in agreement with you regarding Final Cut. I took a workshop to learn it in order to enhance my skills and almost ended up in the hospital with a nervous breakdown. But at least we got to tinker with footage on whales from Sea World and the TV show “Leverage”. 😉

    I had to learn it because it’s what the post-production houses in L.A. required. I think Premiere is far superior, but Final Cut became the industry standard by virtue of being there first.

    Reply
  16. Dennis Shavelson DPM

    Another Integrative Pillar to add to The Diet Pillar in holistic terms is the Rxercise/rehabilitation Pillar.
    You always see the active person featured in diet marketing and most “diets without exerecise” eventually or are proven “freakin lies”.
    In my field, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) (Science) is the bible of insurance companies, the pharmaceutical industry and the researchers and guru’s of EBM who pay for, perform and profit from EBM with obvious personal bias.
    I am an educator-practitioner in Podiatry/Biomechanics and Running being shortcurcuitted by colleagues and others with calls for “proof” as they display weak, biased, low level “evidence (freakin lies) of their own claiming to disprove my work.
    “Scence for Smart Poeple” is a wake-up call, long overdue, that can be delivered on many subjects in order to shake up the establishment “get-sick-and come to me” for profit mentality and convert some of us to prevention, performance enhancement and quality of life advancement which is
    the cornerstone for Integrative/Holistic Health.
    Tom, you are their nightmare and I would hire a food taster (LOL).

    In that light, I am wondering if I can purchase/obtain a copy of your powerpoint presentation from the cruise to use selectively, with appropriate credit, in my biomechanics presentations to podiatry schools and conferences?

    Sorry for the rant and thank you in advance for considering my request.

    I apologize up front for my education, titles, patents and science as my parents were smart and never read books to me (LOL).

    Dennis

    I believe Jimmy Moore is making our presentations available, although I don’t know if it’s only to people from the cruise. If that’s the case, get in touch with me through the contact page and we’ll work something out.

    Reply
  17. Stephen Taylor

    Thanks for this brilliantly presented educational and funny video.
    When I’m explaining about carbs to friends and colleagues, I constantly get the statement that this or that study says you should eat more eggs or less eggs.
    I explain it’s a study and A doesn’t necessarily lead to B.
    Now you have made this video, I can point them to it and hopefully they will understand the importance of real science and real food.

    Thanks again Tom

    Thanks for watching.

    Reply
  18. Ricardo

    Hey Tom if you don’t really eat much meat would avocado be a good substitute? I hear that its considered a very healing food and has good Monounsaturated Fats.

    They’re a good source of fats, but if you’re skipping meat entirely, you’ll want to look for other sources of quality protein.

    Reply
  19. Picky

    Posted to facebook. I’m telling everybody I know that the world isn’t flat, the earth revolves around the sun, and LCHF diets are good for you.

    Thank you.

    Reply
  20. Anna

    Most of us know we’ve been fed a lot of cr*p-in-a-bag and cr*p-in-a box for the past several generations, but how many know we’ve also been fed a lot of cr*p-in-a-study?

    I’m hoping we can increase the number who know.

    Reply
  21. Becky

    Wow! Loved it! As a scientists, things like this (and global warming) really make me angry. So much bad science. Too much political influence. So little common sense, so little critical thinking, so much delusion on the part of the public. Thank you, Tom!

    Thank you for watching.

    Reply
  22. David H

    My boarding school is full of vegetarian evangialists. We need videos like this to show common sense since they constantly criticize meat as a food source. I Use your arguments a lot when debating (thanks)
    Many of your arguements as well as other bloggers have left one of my vegetarian teachers silent and he just said “ok” and a nod and the argument ended there :D. As for another teacher who eats meat but eats it very rarely since it “kills” the environment AND he thinks we are obese from overeating it. He’s a very smart guy and he argues with reason but when i got going all he could muster was a SHUT UP, (haha I was laughing so hard on the inside the one teacher who can hand anyone’s ass to them in a scientific argument could only say shutup when confronted with arguments Tom Naughton-style[we kinda have the same humor, though i actually picked up my sense of humor from someone else, its similar. A little sarcasm and common sense go a long way in making a point :P]) I’ll try to steer people the right way so thanks again for an amusing presentation. Wish I could thank you with something other than a wall of text.
    P.S. LOL I’ll remember not to clog my arteries with Bananas. NOOOO THE CHEST PAINS!!! THE AGONY!!! hahaha as always a great watch.

    A wall of text is a perfectly fine form of thanks.

    Reply
  23. Firebird

    BTW, Tom, I am a professional editor (sports news for the most part) and I am in agreement with you regarding Final Cut. I took a workshop to learn it in order to enhance my skills and almost ended up in the hospital with a nervous breakdown. But at least we got to tinker with footage on whales from Sea World and the TV show “Leverage”. 😉

    I had to learn it because it’s what the post-production houses in L.A. required. I think Premiere is far superior, but Final Cut became the industry standard by virtue of being there first.

    Reply
  24. Dennis Shavelson DPM

    Another Integrative Pillar to add to The Diet Pillar in holistic terms is the Rxercise/rehabilitation Pillar.
    You always see the active person featured in diet marketing and most “diets without exerecise” eventually or are proven “freakin lies”.
    In my field, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) (Science) is the bible of insurance companies, the pharmaceutical industry and the researchers and guru’s of EBM who pay for, perform and profit from EBM with obvious personal bias.
    I am an educator-practitioner in Podiatry/Biomechanics and Running being shortcurcuitted by colleagues and others with calls for “proof” as they display weak, biased, low level “evidence (freakin lies) of their own claiming to disprove my work.
    “Scence for Smart Poeple” is a wake-up call, long overdue, that can be delivered on many subjects in order to shake up the establishment “get-sick-and come to me” for profit mentality and convert some of us to prevention, performance enhancement and quality of life advancement which is
    the cornerstone for Integrative/Holistic Health.
    Tom, you are their nightmare and I would hire a food taster (LOL).

    In that light, I am wondering if I can purchase/obtain a copy of your powerpoint presentation from the cruise to use selectively, with appropriate credit, in my biomechanics presentations to podiatry schools and conferences?

    Sorry for the rant and thank you in advance for considering my request.

    I apologize up front for my education, titles, patents and science as my parents were smart and never read books to me (LOL).

    Dennis

    I believe Jimmy Moore is making our presentations available, although I don’t know if it’s only to people from the cruise. If that’s the case, get in touch with me through the contact page and we’ll work something out.

    Reply
  25. C Wolf

    Great work.

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1007137

    http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/297/9/969.abstract

    http://nutrition.stanford.edu/documents/AZ_press.pdf

    There are so many error sources in experiments that it is difficult to categorize all of them.

    The reality is everybody crosses their fingers after trying to control for variables, but hope that randomization works.

    My favorite methodological error is ‘blind dosing.” Everybody gets the same dose whether they need it or not or whether that dose is effective. But, instead of saying “xx ml/mg/iu/grams of zz in a mixed population with no pre-post serum data yielded no conclusive result,” they often say “zz is no good/not effective/dangerous.”

    Then the headline, news article, study title, and conclusions can all say something different. I love it when the researcher says:”The data was trending towards significant.”

    One of the problems with the nutrition dialogue is the terminology. What does “low carb” mean? Is it ‘low” xx grams of “good carbs”? If you look at the Stanford A-Z study video, you see some of the problems.

    Or using surrgate markers for outcomes, etc.

    In some ways, the focus on macronutrients leaves micronutrients out of the discussion. I almost think we should treat micronutrients as a class as the 4th macronutrient group.

    If you look at nutrition history (Beri Beri, Pellagra, Scurvy, etc.), folks may have had adequate macronutrients and calories, but still got ill or died. Look at the British navy re scurvy or the Japanese navy re beri beri (Takaki Kanehiro,).

    All of which is why the nutrition dialogue needs to become more precise. Broccoli is 71% carbs, but broccoli is low inflammatory, low GI, low GL, high fullness, good fiber, relatively complete, etc. Meanwhile our limited nutrient RDA/DRI system only captures a small % of all the nutrients. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2356/2

    Great work. Fascinating how lives and careers evolve.

    I agree; change macronutrients and you change micronutrients as well, which makes it difficult to pin down one variable.

    Reply
  26. Kathy, RN

    Thanks for adding Dr. Fox’s comments, Tom! For us menopausal women, his informaton is important. 🙂 For any other older women reading, I started oral hormones at menopause (age 51) and developed problems with elevated blood pressure and low thyroid. When I switched to bio-identical, transdermal hormones, blood pressure and thyroid normalized. I think another part of the issue is that Premarin (the most common oral hormone replacement pill), is not even human-based, but equine-based; it comes from PREgnant MARe’s urINe–hence the name! And again, thanks for the wonderful presentation. Laughing and learning go well together! That standing ovation you got on the cruise was well-deserved.

    When Dr. Fox explained the estrogen issues to me over dinner, I was anxious to get him on video. I sure don’t want to scare any women away from the hormones they need.

    Reply
  27. Ricardo

    Hey Tom if you don’t really eat much meat would avocado be a good substitute? I hear that its considered a very healing food and has good Monounsaturated Fats.

    They’re a good source of fats, but if you’re skipping meat entirely, you’ll want to look for other sources of quality protein.

    Reply
  28. Steve B.

    Nice job! One quibble: at about 34:19, you say and show on a slide that for scientists “significant” means “>95% certain results not based on chance.” I think that’s not quite right. What a so-called p-value of 0.05 actually means is that *IF* there is no effect (if the null hypothesis is true) *THEN* there is only a 5% chance that the observed results would occur by chance. This is not the same as saying there’s a 95% chance that there’s an effect, which is how I’m translating your “not based on chance.” I was educated on this by an article in Science News, “Odds Are, It’s Wrong”: http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/57091/title/Odds_are,_its_wrong — access requires a subscription, but some Google will get you to a PDF of the article.

    It would have been more accurate to say any observed difference is less than 5% due to chance.

    Reply
  29. Ricardo

    Well for me personally i just eat chicken breast and Fish cause there the healthiest forms of meat i believe.

    Unless you believe saturated fat causes heart disease, there’s no reason to limit yourself to those meats.

    Reply
  30. Picky

    Posted to facebook. I’m telling everybody I know that the world isn’t flat, the earth revolves around the sun, and LCHF diets are good for you.

    Thank you.

    Reply
  31. Anna

    Most of us know we’ve been fed a lot of cr*p-in-a-bag and cr*p-in-a box for the past several generations, but how many know we’ve also been fed a lot of cr*p-in-a-study?

    I’m hoping we can increase the number who know.

    Reply
  32. Linda Cameron

    Loved your video Science for Smart People, not so much by my husband who majored in science in Uni. However he only saw one teeny tiny bit (the part about basketball players, and what you said just after the that about if you are thin you run -I think that’s what you said) and he threw up his arms and walked out. Oh well, I don’t bother, he is very closed minded. Anyway – I am interested in what you had to say about sodium and high blood pressure. I’ve been battling HBP for a long time, even after losing 80 pounds on low carb, going on two BP meds, exercising 4-5 times a week, my BP just seems to be going up and up. I decided to cut down on sodium, no-salt butter, no table salt at all, restricting high salt foods such as olives and salami, low-salt tuna -you get the idea. My BP went sky high – 195/100 yesterday. MY PT at the gym said it must be wrong and will re-do it on Monday. I don’t know. It just doesn’t seem to be decreasing at all. I want to know what studies I should be reading about lowering HBP. Everything that comes up on Google says lower your sodium, exercise and lose weight. Any suggestions? Thanks! BTW-I feel fine.

    Dr. Richard Johnson’s studies suggest hypertension is a result of excess uric acid, which in turn is driven by fructose consumption. If you’re already on a low-carb diet, it’s unlikely you’re overdoing the fructose. Nonetheless, you may find his lecture interesting:

    http://www.fathead-movie.com/index.php/2010/05/27/another-lecture-on-fructose/

    One article I read about the weak evidence linking salt to hypertension suggested that a higher potassium intake may help.

    Reply
  33. Becky

    Wow! Loved it! As a scientists, things like this (and global warming) really make me angry. So much bad science. Too much political influence. So little common sense, so little critical thinking, so much delusion on the part of the public. Thank you, Tom!

    Thank you for watching.

    Reply
  34. David H

    My boarding school is full of vegetarian evangialists. We need videos like this to show common sense since they constantly criticize meat as a food source. I Use your arguments a lot when debating (thanks)
    Many of your arguements as well as other bloggers have left one of my vegetarian teachers silent and he just said “ok” and a nod and the argument ended there :D. As for another teacher who eats meat but eats it very rarely since it “kills” the environment AND he thinks we are obese from overeating it. He’s a very smart guy and he argues with reason but when i got going all he could muster was a SHUT UP, (haha I was laughing so hard on the inside the one teacher who can hand anyone’s ass to them in a scientific argument could only say shutup when confronted with arguments Tom Naughton-style[we kinda have the same humor, though i actually picked up my sense of humor from someone else, its similar. A little sarcasm and common sense go a long way in making a point :P]) I’ll try to steer people the right way so thanks again for an amusing presentation. Wish I could thank you with something other than a wall of text.
    P.S. LOL I’ll remember not to clog my arteries with Bananas. NOOOO THE CHEST PAINS!!! THE AGONY!!! hahaha as always a great watch.

    A wall of text is a perfectly fine form of thanks.

    Reply
  35. C Wolf

    Great work.

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1007137

    http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/297/9/969.abstract

    http://nutrition.stanford.edu/documents/AZ_press.pdf

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eREuZEdMAVo

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XR3FVvEJ-Nk

    There are so many error sources in experiments that it is difficult to categorize all of them.

    The reality is everybody crosses their fingers after trying to control for variables, but hope that randomization works.

    My favorite methodological error is ‘blind dosing.” Everybody gets the same dose whether they need it or not or whether that dose is effective. But, instead of saying “xx ml/mg/iu/grams of zz in a mixed population with no pre-post serum data yielded no conclusive result,” they often say “zz is no good/not effective/dangerous.”

    Then the headline, news article, study title, and conclusions can all say something different. I love it when the researcher says:”The data was trending towards significant.”

    One of the problems with the nutrition dialogue is the terminology. What does “low carb” mean? Is it ‘low” xx grams of “good carbs”? If you look at the Stanford A-Z study video, you see some of the problems.

    Or using surrgate markers for outcomes, etc.

    In some ways, the focus on macronutrients leaves micronutrients out of the discussion. I almost think we should treat micronutrients as a class as the 4th macronutrient group.

    If you look at nutrition history (Beri Beri, Pellagra, Scurvy, etc.), folks may have had adequate macronutrients and calories, but still got ill or died. Look at the British navy re scurvy or the Japanese navy re beri beri (Takaki Kanehiro,).

    All of which is why the nutrition dialogue needs to become more precise. Broccoli is 71% carbs, but broccoli is low inflammatory, low GI, low GL, high fullness, good fiber, relatively complete, etc. Meanwhile our limited nutrient RDA/DRI system only captures a small % of all the nutrients. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2356/2

    Great work. Fascinating how lives and careers evolve.

    I agree; change macronutrients and you change micronutrients as well, which makes it difficult to pin down one variable.

    Reply
  36. Kathy, RN

    Thanks for adding Dr. Fox’s comments, Tom! For us menopausal women, his informaton is important. 🙂 For any other older women reading, I started oral hormones at menopause (age 51) and developed problems with elevated blood pressure and low thyroid. When I switched to bio-identical, transdermal hormones, blood pressure and thyroid normalized. I think another part of the issue is that Premarin (the most common oral hormone replacement pill), is not even human-based, but equine-based; it comes from PREgnant MARe’s urINe–hence the name! And again, thanks for the wonderful presentation. Laughing and learning go well together! That standing ovation you got on the cruise was well-deserved.

    When Dr. Fox explained the estrogen issues to me over dinner, I was anxious to get him on video. I sure don’t want to scare any women away from the hormones they need.

    Reply
  37. Steve B.

    Nice job! One quibble: at about 34:19, you say and show on a slide that for scientists “significant” means “>95% certain results not based on chance.” I think that’s not quite right. What a so-called p-value of 0.05 actually means is that *IF* there is no effect (if the null hypothesis is true) *THEN* there is only a 5% chance that the observed results would occur by chance. This is not the same as saying there’s a 95% chance that there’s an effect, which is how I’m translating your “not based on chance.” I was educated on this by an article in Science News, “Odds Are, It’s Wrong”: http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/57091/title/Odds_are,_its_wrong — access requires a subscription, but some Google will get you to a PDF of the article.

    It would have been more accurate to say any observed difference is less than 5% due to chance.

    Reply
  38. Ricardo

    Well for me personally i just eat chicken breast and Fish cause there the healthiest forms of meat i believe.

    Unless you believe saturated fat causes heart disease, there’s no reason to limit yourself to those meats.

    Reply
  39. Lori

    Thanks for doing this presentation and posting online, Tom. It was funny and informative. Although I have an engineering degree, I wasn’t familiar with how studies were done until I started reading sites like yours, and your speech made certain things more clear. Observational studies weren’t part of the engineering curriculum, and in fact, spending four and a half years solving problems to get the right answer led me to think (erroneously) that that is standard operating procedure for smart people. But now I think there are people who want to get to the truth (and they don’t have to be smart) and people who are clever enough to invent ways of avoiding it.

    I wish I’d known more about observational studies when I was still writing for a little health magazine. I would’ve asked more critical-thinking questions instead of just passing along the researchers’ conclusions.

    Reply
  40. JMarra

    The plaque effects of ERT aside (I take Prempro, which is the oral estrogen/progesterone combo pill), I’m curious about weight gain associated with lack of estrogen in menopause, and the weight gain that is listed as a side effect of ERT. It would seem you can’t win for losing! Does it have something to do with naturally produced versus synthetic hormones? Taubes wrote that estrogen reduced fat storage (something about upregulation of receptors), but since starting ERT my weight loss has been much slower than I’d like on a LCHF diet. Atkins wrote that he tries to get women off ERT, because it can make losing weight difficult if not impossible. Any thoughts?

    I’m not sure. Anybody else who can provide more information on the topic, please chime in.

    Reply
  41. Linda Cameron

    Loved your video Science for Smart People, not so much by my husband who majored in science in Uni. However he only saw one teeny tiny bit (the part about basketball players, and what you said just after the that about if you are thin you run -I think that’s what you said) and he threw up his arms and walked out. Oh well, I don’t bother, he is very closed minded. Anyway – I am interested in what you had to say about sodium and high blood pressure. I’ve been battling HBP for a long time, even after losing 80 pounds on low carb, going on two BP meds, exercising 4-5 times a week, my BP just seems to be going up and up. I decided to cut down on sodium, no-salt butter, no table salt at all, restricting high salt foods such as olives and salami, low-salt tuna -you get the idea. My BP went sky high – 195/100 yesterday. MY PT at the gym said it must be wrong and will re-do it on Monday. I don’t know. It just doesn’t seem to be decreasing at all. I want to know what studies I should be reading about lowering HBP. Everything that comes up on Google says lower your sodium, exercise and lose weight. Any suggestions? Thanks! BTW-I feel fine.

    Dr. Richard Johnson’s studies suggest hypertension is a result of excess uric acid, which in turn is driven by fructose consumption. If you’re already on a low-carb diet, it’s unlikely you’re overdoing the fructose. Nonetheless, you may find his lecture interesting:

    http://www.fathead-movie.com/index.php/2010/05/27/another-lecture-on-fructose/

    One article I read about the weak evidence linking salt to hypertension suggested that a higher potassium intake may help.

    Reply
  42. Ricardo

    I just assumed that it would proboly be better to stay on the safe side. Also there’s this interesting video saying Protein and Fat Lead to Insulin Resistance. Just wanted to know what are you opinion thank you.

    I think the key is what the prof. said … eating a high-everything diet (and he mentioned excess carbs specifically) is the problem. Like Dr. Feinman is always pointing out, there’s a big difference in how fats affect us in the presence of high carbohydrates versus low carbohydrates. High carb and high fat together seems to be the worst possible combination.

    Reply
  43. Lori

    Thanks for doing this presentation and posting online, Tom. It was funny and informative. Although I have an engineering degree, I wasn’t familiar with how studies were done until I started reading sites like yours, and your speech made certain things more clear. Observational studies weren’t part of the engineering curriculum, and in fact, spending four and a half years solving problems to get the right answer led me to think (erroneously) that that is standard operating procedure for smart people. But now I think there are people who want to get to the truth (and they don’t have to be smart) and people who are clever enough to invent ways of avoiding it.

    I wish I’d known more about observational studies when I was still writing for a little health magazine. I would’ve asked more critical-thinking questions instead of just passing along the researchers’ conclusions.

    Reply
  44. JMarra

    The plaque effects of ERT aside (I take Prempro, which is the oral estrogen/progesterone combo pill), I’m curious about weight gain associated with lack of estrogen in menopause, and the weight gain that is listed as a side effect of ERT. It would seem you can’t win for losing! Does it have something to do with naturally produced versus synthetic hormones? Taubes wrote that estrogen reduced fat storage (something about upregulation of receptors), but since starting ERT my weight loss has been much slower than I’d like on a LCHF diet. Atkins wrote that he tries to get women off ERT, because it can make losing weight difficult if not impossible. Any thoughts?

    I’m not sure. Anybody else who can provide more information on the topic, please chime in.

    Reply
  45. Ricardo

    I just assumed that it would proboly be better to stay on the safe side. Also there’s this interesting video saying Protein and Fat Lead to Insulin Resistance. Just wanted to know what are you opinion thank you.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3hm1rhOiRc

    I think the key is what the prof. said … eating a high-everything diet (and he mentioned excess carbs specifically) is the problem. Like Dr. Feinman is always pointing out, there’s a big difference in how fats affect us in the presence of high carbohydrates versus low carbohydrates. High carb and high fat together seems to be the worst possible combination.

    Reply
  46. Gary L Green

    I’m a chiropractor and long time evangelist for Low Carb. Tom you are highly intelligent and have a wonderful way of communicating. I have introduced your movie FatHead to many of my patients and fellow chiropractors (most of which were too stupid to see the science) and now I’ll be showing them your presentation on scientists and research. Bravo to you and please keep up the good work.

    Reply
  47. Gary L Green

    I’m a chiropractor and long time evangelist for Low Carb. Tom you are highly intelligent and have a wonderful way of communicating. I have introduced your movie FatHead to many of my patients and fellow chiropractors (most of which were too stupid to see the science) and now I’ll be showing them your presentation on scientists and research. Bravo to you and please keep up the good work.

    Reply
  48. C Wolf

    Micronutrient deficiencies are major issues. Iodine alone is #4 in the world.

    Beef is a rich source of iron and B vitamins.

    1. Compare fat content from skinless chicken to lean beef.

    2. Then compare nutrients.

    3. Resources:

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/36060836/Iron-Status-Exercising-Women-1991

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/35597624/McClung-J-Am-Coll-Nutr-2006

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/35597577/McClung-AJCN-09

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/36060762/Beef-Exercise

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/35561337/HealthPerformMilWomenCBT1995

    Reply

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