Booked

      19 Comments on Booked

I finished my almost-final edit of the book last night around 9:00 PM, then drove home from the office. It’s an almost-final edit because Chareva read the whole thing today and told me she has some minor suggestions to offer. Words here and there, stuff like that.

She now has rather a lot of drawing to do, plus the book layout. Crunch time. I had it in my head that the low-carb cruise is near the end of May, like last year’s. Nope. We set sail on May 1st. So if I’m going to take copies with me – and I’d dearly love to – we need to have a final ready to print in April.

With my part of the book done (or almost done), I’ll be turning my attention to the film version next. Way back when I conceived of this thing, the plan was to release the book with a DVD companion. Then the reality of work, kids, farm, etc. set in. If I wait to have them both finished, lord only knows how many more months it will be. So it’s book first, film later.

I’ll get back to real blogging next week.

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19 thoughts on “Booked

  1. Linda

    Congrats on the near finish! I had no idea that the book could be in print this soon! What a talented combination you and Chareva are! I’ll be waiting. And also waiting for that regular blogging of yours. I need those fixes every week!

    Reply
      1. Dianne

        Me, too! But whenever I say to my sister (retiring this month from Microsoft) that I prefer “real” books, she insists that the ones she reads on her little electronic gadget are real books. Maybe so, but I can’t help wondering if we’d still have all that wonderful literature from ages past if it had only been published electronically, dependent on ever-changing technology for being made readable. Would we have Thomas Aquinas, Shakespeare, Aristotle, or even Mike Royko? We’re always hearing about some old document turning up in an attic or a monastery someplace, revealing something more about our past history. And, as you say, there’s just something about the feel of a book in one’s hands, the sensation of opening a long-wanted and finally-acquired tome. It’s like opening a treasure chest. And sometimes years after you’ve read it and enjoyed it and put it on the shelf, you spot it there and remember how good it was, so you take it down and read it over, rediscovering the old pleasures. It’s like revisiting an old friend. Somehow, I can’t see doing that with an electronic book. All the ones my sister has are sort of off in a cloud somewhere, like vapor, with nothing present in her home to remind her that she has them and can enjoy them or refer to them once more. If we go to purely electronic publishing, as some say we will, will future generations even have access to the literature of today? Technology will have changed.

        OK, off my soapbox now. But I’m certainly glad “Hamlet” and the scriptures weren’t originally published electronically!

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton

          I have nothing against e-books and I listen to audiobooks during my daily commute to make use of the time. But there’s still nothing like the feel of a hefty book in your hands.

          Reply
          1. Mary D

            I devour my fair share of audio books during my 1.5 hours of commuting every workday, but for technical reading of any kind I really prefer the printed page. Just too hard to scribble a thought in the margins or stick on a page flag with an audio book or e-book!

            Reply
  2. Linda

    Congrats on the near finish! I had no idea that the book could be in print this soon! What a talented combination you and Chareva are! I’ll be waiting. And also waiting for that regular blogging of yours. I need those fixes every week!

    Reply
      1. Dianne

        Me, too! But whenever I say to my sister (retiring this month from Microsoft) that I prefer “real” books, she insists that the ones she reads on her little electronic gadget are real books. Maybe so, but I can’t help wondering if we’d still have all that wonderful literature from ages past if it had only been published electronically, dependent on ever-changing technology for being made readable. Would we have Thomas Aquinas, Shakespeare, Aristotle, or even Mike Royko? We’re always hearing about some old document turning up in an attic or a monastery someplace, revealing something more about our past history. And, as you say, there’s just something about the feel of a book in one’s hands, the sensation of opening a long-wanted and finally-acquired tome. It’s like opening a treasure chest. And sometimes years after you’ve read it and enjoyed it and put it on the shelf, you spot it there and remember how good it was, so you take it down and read it over, rediscovering the old pleasures. It’s like revisiting an old friend. Somehow, I can’t see doing that with an electronic book. All the ones my sister has are sort of off in a cloud somewhere, like vapor, with nothing present in her home to remind her that she has them and can enjoy them or refer to them once more. If we go to purely electronic publishing, as some say we will, will future generations even have access to the literature of today? Technology will have changed.

        OK, off my soapbox now. But I’m certainly glad “Hamlet” and the scriptures weren’t originally published electronically!

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          I have nothing against e-books and I listen to audiobooks during my daily commute to make use of the time. But there’s still nothing like the feel of a hefty book in your hands.

          Reply
          1. Mary D

            I devour my fair share of audio books during my 1.5 hours of commuting every workday, but for technical reading of any kind I really prefer the printed page. Just too hard to scribble a thought in the margins or stick on a page flag with an audio book or e-book!

            Reply
            1. Tom Naughton Post author

              Same for me with books on diet and health. I want to highlight paragraphs and bend page corners.

  3. Todd

    Looking forward to the DVD. You have that “I’m Tom Bodett for Motel 6, and we’ll leave the light on for you”, underplayed delivery that is so effective.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      I appreciate that. During one of my road trips, I listened to an audiobook of Bodett telling stories from his life. Very enjoyable.

      Reply
  4. Todd

    Looking forward to the DVD. You have that “I’m Tom Bodett for Motel 6, and we’ll leave the light on for you”, underplayed delivery that is so effective.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      I appreciate that. During one of my road trips, I listened to an audiobook of Bodett telling stories from his life. Very enjoyable.

      Reply

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