Writing Time

      33 Comments on Writing Time

One of the managers at work has another project in mind he’d like me to take on.  Since I’m already working on a big project, he wondered aloud in a meeting if I’d consider cloning myself.

Heck, if I could clone myself, I would have already done it.  It’s almost October, and I still have miles to go on that book project — which I originally wanted to have written last October.   Programming job, blogging, book writing, weekend farm chores, a bit of R & R time with Chareva and the girls … there just aren’t enough hours in a week.

So for now, I’m going to reduce the blogging workload to one post per week on Thursday.  My Monday-evening writing sessions will be dedicated to the book instead of the blog.

Promise I’ll do my best to make the book worth the wait.

 


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33 thoughts on “Writing Time

  1. Dianne

    We’re gonna miss getting two posts a week, but frankly, I’ve been wondering how you keep up with everything and still get a modicum of sleep. Come to think of it, you didn’t mention sleep in your list of things you need to do, but even if you’re one of those people who don’t need much, you still need at least a little now and again.

    Blessings on you and yours. We’ll look forward to seeing the book.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      I’m pretty adamant about squeezing eight hours of sleep into the schedule.

      I can block out writing time for the book and make it work on paper. What I hadn’t figured on is that my current work project is highly complicated and therefore mentally taxing. So there’s a limit to how much brain power is left over for writing. Trying to write a post and another few pages of the book on the same day just isn’t happening.

      Reply
  2. Dianne

    We’re gonna miss getting two posts a week, but frankly, I’ve been wondering how you keep up with everything and still get a modicum of sleep. Come to think of it, you didn’t mention sleep in your list of things you need to do, but even if you’re one of those people who don’t need much, you still need at least a little now and again.

    Blessings on you and yours. We’ll look forward to seeing the book.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      I’m pretty adamant about squeezing eight hours of sleep into the schedule.

      I can block out writing time for the book and make it work on paper. What I hadn’t figured on is that my current work project is highly complicated and therefore mentally taxing. So there’s a limit to how much brain power is left over for writing. Trying to write a post and another few pages of the book on the same day just isn’t happening.

      Reply
  3. Ulfric Douglas

    “Heck, if I could clone myself, I would have already done it. ”
    You can, but you won’t.
    It was developed just forty miles from here,
    but now involves Koreans.
    Expensive, but happenning already.

    Reply
  4. Ulfric Douglas

    “Heck, if I could clone myself, I would have already done it. ”
    You can, but you won’t.
    It was developed just forty miles from here,
    but now involves Koreans.
    Expensive, but happenning already.

    Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          “Hey, girls, how would you like to have FOUR parents telling you what to do?”

          I can imagine that response.

          Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      I’ll be here, just not as often. I’m already picking up the pace on the book, just from having an extra free evening.

      Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      I’ll be here, just not as often. I’m already picking up the pace on the book, just from having an extra free evening.

      Reply
  5. Stephen T.

    Jennifer Elliot is an experienced dietitian in Australia who has been sacked by her local health district for advocating a low carb diet to her diabetic patients. She was first de-registered by the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA), so she couldn’t practice.

    Elliot became interested in a low carb approach after problems with her daughter’s health and weight. Help from a doctor led to a diagnosis of insulin resistance. Elliot studied the subject and later wrote a book ‘Baby Boomers, Bellies and Blood Sugars’.

    Elliot’s rational but non-standard advice has clearly made her enemies. In a world of largely compliant and unthinking dietitians who happily tell diabetics to eat a ‘balanced’ diet of 40 – 65% carbs, she stood out. On her website, she even said she was embarrassed to be a dietitian. She’s far from the first to say that. Sure enough a fine upstanding dietitian made a formal complaint about Elliot’s low carb advice to the DAA and her employer then stated: “Nutritional advice to clients must not include a low carbohydrate diet. Jennifer will be advised on the information that she may provide to clients…. ”

    In Elliot’s words: “Can you imagine having to tell a client with diabetes, who has lowered his BGLs, lost weight and come off all diabetes medications by reducing his carb intake, that he now has to start eating more carbs because SNSW Health says so!?”

    After the DAA de-registered her, Elliot was sacked. The fuss that followed had the DAA running for cover and claiming that her low carb advice was not the reason for her sacking, but there were suddenly other unstated “Far deeper issues.” This is a familiar tactic seen in many big organisations. When they can’t justify a bad decision, they blacken the name of the person you’ve already wronged. The dietitian’s letter of complaint is clearly about Elliot’s advice.

    So, a caring dietitian who is helping people is thrown on the scrapheap to salve the wounded pride of the DAA and the New South Wales health service. That should quieten any dissent in the ranks, but where does it leave Australian diabetics? The only people who gain from this stupidity are manufacturers of drugs and artificial limbs.

    Jennifer Elliot’s website is babyboomersandbellies.com

    I’ve written an e-mail to the New South Wales Minister for Health asking for an inquiry into the DAA’s conduct. I’m sure Jennifer Elliot would appreciate your support.

    The Credit Suisse report states that our health systems are years behind the science and this is another unwelcome example (page 51).

    Australia seems to be the strongest and most stubborn supporter of Ancel Keys and his low-fat mistake.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      If it were just government agencies exhibiting the usual stubbornness about admitting when they’re wrong, this would merely be laughable. But they’re killing people with their crappy advice.

      Reply

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