Weekend Stuff

      64 Comments on Weekend Stuff

 

Almost Normal Knee

I graduated (their term) from physical therapy on Friday.  At my first session, I could only bend my knee 90 degrees.  The other knee could bend 140 degrees.  As of Friday, I could bend the surgically-repaired knee 139 degrees and extend it to 2 degrees beyond straight, which is what we wanted.  When I couldn’t fully straighten the knee, standing gave me cramps in my calf.

The surgeon said I can start lifting weights again, but he wants me to start with 100 pounds on the leg press.  I’m tempted to wear a big bandage on the knee so I don’t look like a weenie, pushing less than a third of the stack.  Before surgery, I used the whole stack for leg presses.

The surgeon also urged me to give up sprinting around the land for exercise.  I agreed.  It was fun, but with a surgically-repaired knee, I shouldn’t be pounding the joint.  He suggested investing in a recumbent exercise bike and using that for my “sprints.”

Bug Off

I resumed playing disc golf a couple of weeks ago, and the chiggers resumed hopping on my legs and feet and biting me, even though I wear long pants when I play.  I kept them at bay earlier in the summer by soaking my socks with Deep Woods Off, but I wasn’t crazy about the idea of using all that DEET.  I tried using a natural insect repellant made by the Off company, but the chiggers weren’t impressed.

While I was recovering from knee surgery, a reader sent me a bottle of this stuff.  It’s a natural insect repellant made from grape seed oil and other ingredients.  It smells a bit like Lemon Pledge when you spray it on, but that fades.  I’ve used it four times now, spraying it on my bare feet, ankles and shins before going outside to play, and I haven’t been bitten once.

I’m not in business with them or anything, but since the product seems to work and isn’t toxic, I thought I’d mention it.  You can visit their web site here.

Health Assessment

A reader whose employer requires everyone to fill out a diet questionnaire for an official health assessment sent me his assessment:

ALEXANDER, although your current diet has much room for improvement, the fact that you are working on it is a good sign. The great thing about a healthy diet is that you can start making better choices today. If you keep it up, you will soon notice the benefits. You indicated that you have been working on improving your diet, but are still making some poor diet decisions. Perhaps you need to learn more about what foods are healthy and what foods are not. The diet information below provides some useful guidelines to get you firmly on the path to a truly healthy diet.

You reported that you consume 3 servings of fruits and/or vegetables per day, 0 servings of whole-grain foods per day, 3 servings of high-quality protein per day, 0 servings of low-fat dairy products per day, and an average of 3 servings of high-fat foods per day.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans stress the importance of variety in your diet. You should consume foods within the basic food groups (breads and cereals, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat), but choose foods that are low in saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars, and salt. Choose lean meats and poultry and incorporate more fish, beans, peas, nuts, and seeds for added protein sources. If you are vegetarian or vegan, that’s great! You are probably getting plenty of fresh and vital foods, but remember to take a multivitamin supplement for vitamin B- 12.

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet, you should consume fats sparingly (less than 3 servings of high fat foods per day) and at least:

  • 5 servings of fruits and vegetables
  • 4 or more servings of whole-grain foods
  • 3 (2-3 ounce) servings of high-quality protein (lean meats, beans, nuts, seeds, or tofu)
  • 3 servings of low fat milk or dairy products

For a plan specific to your needs, visit http://www.choosemyplate.gov/. In addition, if you have gluten sensitivity (Celiac disease), you should avoid wheat, rye, and barley products. If you have lactose intolerance, you should avoid milk products or take lactase enzyme supplements to help digest the milk sugar. If you are vegan or vegetarian, you can substitute high-protein nuts, seeds, beans, and tofu. These foods also contain lots of available calcium and other essential vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids.

We develop good nutrition over a lifetime. Sometimes our nutritional habits, if unhealthy, can be difficult to change. You are exploring how to develop proper eating habits — good for you!

Keeping on Track with Nutrition

An Action Plan for You:

1.   Food diary. Record what you eat in a food diary. By tracking what you eat on a daily basis, you will be able to see how much you are eating. You can also see what type of foods you are eating. Be sure to record what, how much, where, and when you eat.

2.   Food guide. Use the USDA’s ChooseMyPlate food guide or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans to guide you. Recommendations for following the ChooseMyPlate food guide are based on your gender, age, and activity level. Eating a variety of food will give you essential nutrients needed to be healthy.

3.   Food labels. Look at food labels. Labels list calories, calories from fat, and the amount of nutrients in each serving of food. Nutrient content is expressed not only as an amount by weight, but also as a percentage of the recommended daily value. Use the additional information about food labels in the back of this report for further guidance

4.   Find substitutions. You can still enjoy all the foods you love and still cut calories! Instead of 2% milk, try 1%. See the sample menu below for more ideas.

Sample substitution menu:

  • Instead of: A plain bagel with cream cheese. 
    Try:
    A whole wheat English muffin with sugar-free jelly.
  • Instead of: A salami sandwich with mayo and lettuce and a soft drink. 
    Try:
    A lean turkey sandwich with mustard, spinach leaves, and a tomato slice. Add a cup of skim or 1% milk for calcium
  • Instead of: Pasta with creamy Alfredo sauce, garlic bread, and Caesar salad.
    Try: Whole grain pasta with a tomato-based sauce. Have a side of steamed broccoli with reduced-fat cheese sprinkled on top.

 

He will of course be ignoring the advice, which means he’ll probably live longer than the people giving it out.


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64 thoughts on “Weekend Stuff

  1. Violeta

    Glad to hear that your knee is now much better and almost completely healthy.

    As for Alexander’s diet, it looks just fine to me. I suggest the following action plan: Press on as usual, Alexander!

  2. j

    Seems like a pretty canned response from the diet adviser. I’d bet that most of his coworkers got very similar bad advice form letters.

  3. Lynda

    That diet assignment makes me laugh and cry at the same time! It reminds me of all the Dr Oz shows that have been playing here in NZ lately. Loads of episodes about how to reduce the calories by making lower calorie versions of favorite foods. Sounds logical but anyone who has tried it knows you just can’t do that – hunger takes over and you eat twice as much of the “low calorie” alternatives!

    Exactly.

  4. Bill Lee

    I noticed the questionnaire only gives the option of low-fat dairy products, meaning that delicious whole milk, butter and cheeses obviously don’t count to the morons who came up with this.

    Nope, they’re convinced those foods will kill us.

  5. Beowulf

    How in the world did we all stay so lean and healthy before food labels, food diaries, low-fat dairy, and those oh-so-wonderful guidelines by the USDA? Must’ve been a million year-long fluke.

    Well, according to the experts, after thousands of generations, we suddenly became weak, gluttonous and undisciplined all in the past 30 years.

  6. Marilyn

    “The Dietary Guidelines for Americans stress the importance of variety in your diet. You should consume foods within the basic food groups (breads and cereals, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat) . . . If you are vegetarian or vegan, that’s great!”

    Huh? How is a diet that seriously limits or completely eliminates meat and dairy any more varied than one that limits or eliminates breads and cereals? Doesn’t compute.

    Don’t go trying to apply logic to these guidelines. You’ll just end up sitting on the floor muttering.

  7. Marilyn

    Oh, yes. And congratulations on your knee recovery. One other reason for not sprinting around your farm is that your foot could land on an uneven spot, with unhappy result.

    Yup, and we have plenty of those.

  8. Violeta

    Glad to hear that your knee is now much better and almost completely healthy.

    As for Alexander’s diet, it looks just fine to me. I suggest the following action plan: Press on as usual, Alexander!

  9. j

    Seems like a pretty canned response from the diet adviser. I’d bet that most of his coworkers got very similar bad advice form letters.

  10. Lynda

    That diet assignment makes me laugh and cry at the same time! It reminds me of all the Dr Oz shows that have been playing here in NZ lately. Loads of episodes about how to reduce the calories by making lower calorie versions of favorite foods. Sounds logical but anyone who has tried it knows you just can’t do that – hunger takes over and you eat twice as much of the “low calorie” alternatives!

    Exactly.

  11. Marilyn

    OK, Alexander. Here’s how to figure things.

    Chocolate is made from a bean. Beans are a vegetable. So chocolate is a vegetable. (That’s not an original thought.) Coffee, likewise is made from beans. There have been articles about the good things in coffee — some of the good things touted for other vegetables. So every time you drink an infusion of coffee beans (cup of coffee), you have a vegetable.

    My dad’s pet names for eggs were “hen fruit” and “cackle berries.” There you have it. Every time you eat three eggs for breakfast, it’s three fruit servings right there. If you have bacon, pork fat is 50% monounsaturated (according the Mary Enig). Since everyone assumes incorrectly that pork fat is saturated, you’ll have to check “olive oil” or “almonds” to give an accurate picture.

    Commercial whole milk is simply skim milk with a carefully measured amount of cream added back. So, when you have a glass of whole milk, you’re really having mostly non-fat milk.

    If you have a 16 oz serving of steak, it’s still one serving.

    Cereal? Granola is mostly nuts, so when you have a couple of fistfuls of nuts, you have granola (without the sugar). And if you eat low carb breads, they’re still “bread.”

    🙂

    I guess I’m eating more vegetables than I thought.

  12. Bill Lee

    I noticed the questionnaire only gives the option of low-fat dairy products, meaning that delicious whole milk, butter and cheeses obviously don’t count to the morons who came up with this.

    Nope, they’re convinced those foods will kill us.

  13. Beowulf

    How in the world did we all stay so lean and healthy before food labels, food diaries, low-fat dairy, and those oh-so-wonderful guidelines by the USDA? Must’ve been a million year-long fluke.

    Well, according to the experts, after thousands of generations, we suddenly became weak, gluttonous and undisciplined all in the past 30 years.

  14. Marilyn

    “The Dietary Guidelines for Americans stress the importance of variety in your diet. You should consume foods within the basic food groups (breads and cereals, fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat) . . . If you are vegetarian or vegan, that’s great!”

    Huh? How is a diet that seriously limits or completely eliminates meat and dairy any more varied than one that limits or eliminates breads and cereals? Doesn’t compute.

    Don’t go trying to apply logic to these guidelines. You’ll just end up sitting on the floor muttering.

  15. Marilyn

    Oh, yes. And congratulations on your knee recovery. One other reason for not sprinting around your farm is that your foot could land on an uneven spot, with unhappy result.

    Yup, and we have plenty of those.

  16. Marilyn

    OK, Alexander. Here’s how to figure things.

    Chocolate is made from a bean. Beans are a vegetable. So chocolate is a vegetable. (That’s not an original thought.) Coffee, likewise is made from beans. There have been articles about the good things in coffee — some of the good things touted for other vegetables. So every time you drink an infusion of coffee beans (cup of coffee), you have a vegetable.

    My dad’s pet names for eggs were “hen fruit” and “cackle berries.” There you have it. Every time you eat three eggs for breakfast, it’s three fruit servings right there. If you have bacon, pork fat is 50% monounsaturated (according the Mary Enig). Since everyone assumes incorrectly that pork fat is saturated, you’ll have to check “olive oil” or “almonds” to give an accurate picture.

    Commercial whole milk is simply skim milk with a carefully measured amount of cream added back. So, when you have a glass of whole milk, you’re really having mostly non-fat milk.

    If you have a 16 oz serving of steak, it’s still one serving.

    Cereal? Granola is mostly nuts, so when you have a couple of fistfuls of nuts, you have granola (without the sugar). And if you eat low carb breads, they’re still “bread.”

    🙂

    I guess I’m eating more vegetables than I thought.

  17. gharkness

    This is very similar to a new initiative just announced at the company I worked for (until last week). They will pay each employee $200 to complete the health assessment. Given the conventional wisdom, they probably would have sent out the same sort of “advice” to me.

    But THAT’s not the disturbing part. The part that bothers me is: how long will it be before they start requiring employees to actually follow this advice, with attendant supervisory intrusiveness and penalties for non-compliance?

    That would be the worrisome part, but then people would have to develop a spine and refuse. Companies take notice if their policies cost them good employees.

    Years ago, a tech agency interviewed me, introduced me to their client, was all prepared to sign on the dotted line and have me start a long-term assignment, then told me, Oh by the way, everyone who works for us has to take a drug test. Company policy. I told them in that case, I wouldn’t be working through them. They were royally ticked off, because their client clearly wanted me for the job. I explained that they had every right to make a drug test a condition of employment, that I would pass the test with flying colors, but I wasn’t going to work for a company that thinks it’s any of their business if I smoke pot on my own time.

    The next day, a manager called and said he’d received permission to let me skip the drug test. So you can imagine his anger when I said, “No, you don’t understand. I don’t care if you’re going to let me skip the test. I’m not working for a company that requires programmers to take a drug test, period.”

    After he finished yelling and calmed down, the manager said, “You know, I’ve been trying to convince my boss this drug-test policy is costing us some good programmers.”

    Bingo.

  18. Firebird

    Would a reply to that assessment with the words “F— You” in the title be reason for termination?

    Good to see that you have improvement in the knee. It is amazing what has transpired over the last 60 years with physical therapy. A friend of mine has a book written in 1951 called “Progressive Resistance Exercise”, written by Drs. Thomas DeLorme and Arthur L. Watkins. These two are the Godfathers of not only physical therapy, but also formed the basis of the modern day fitness training system. The wording is different, but essentially, their conclusions to fitness training were this: Lift a weight heavy enough to achieve X amount of reps. When you achieve that, add more resistance, lower to X amount of reps, and repeat.

    The doctors successfully treated numerous WW II vets who returned with serious injuries. That is the basis of their book, and in 1951, were laughed at by the medical community. 60 years later, they are largely forgotten for their contributions.

    I think people like Atkins, Taubes, Davis et al, in 50, 60 years, will be proven right, just as Delorme and Watkins were.

    I hope it doesn’t take that long.

    I was never worried much about the knee. My shoulder was so messed up after surgery some years ago, I didn’t think it would ever be normal again. After coming back from that, I figure the knee would be relatively easy, and it was.

  19. gharkness

    This is very similar to a new initiative just announced at the company I worked for (until last week). They will pay each employee $200 to complete the health assessment. Given the conventional wisdom, they probably would have sent out the same sort of “advice” to me.

    But THAT’s not the disturbing part. The part that bothers me is: how long will it be before they start requiring employees to actually follow this advice, with attendant supervisory intrusiveness and penalties for non-compliance?

    That would be the worrisome part, but then people would have to develop a spine and refuse. Companies take notice if their policies cost them good employees.

    Years ago, a tech agency interviewed me, introduced me to their client, was all prepared to sign on the dotted line and have me start a long-term assignment, then told me, Oh by the way, everyone who works for us has to take a drug test. Company policy. I told them in that case, I wouldn’t be working through them. They were royally ticked off, because their client clearly wanted me for the job. I explained that they had every right to make a drug test a condition of employment, that I would pass the test with flying colors, but I wasn’t going to work for a company that thinks it’s any of their business if I smoke pot on my own time.

    The next day, a manager called and said he’d received permission to let me skip the drug test. So you can imagine his anger when I said, “No, you don’t understand. I don’t care if you’re going to let me skip the test. I’m not working for a company that requires programmers to take a drug test, period.”

    After he finished yelling and calmed down, the manager said, “You know, I’ve been trying to convince my boss this drug-test policy is costing us some good programmers.”

    Bingo.

  20. Rae

    Any time I read a government-approved “sample menu” I feel like I’m going to starve. How can people live on that? Woefully inadequate. This attitude of “eat as little as you possibly can” is sad and destructive. I eat FAR more fat and protein now than I did when I was obese. The body needs nutrition!

    It is sad. We’ve got countless people thinking they have to be miserable to keep their weight down.

  21. gibson girl

    I also get questionnaires and “helpful” advice from my insurance company. It’s scary. Luckily, I’m retired now, so I can’t be fired, but the insurance company could easily raise my rates if they think I’m a “health risk”.

    @Marilyn: I love the concept of “sugar-free granola”! 🙂

    I would hope insurance companies would at least ask for some tests, not just go by a questionnaire.

  22. Rae

    Looking at the meals that were suggested there, my immediate thought for every single one was, “If I ate that I would be hungry again in less than an hour.” Also, it bothers me that people think veganism is healthy. Any diet where you are heavily and widely encouraged to take a B-12 supplement for energy is NOT healthy.

    You’d be hungry, and then they’d tell you not to eat.

  23. Firebird

    Would a reply to that assessment with the words “F— You” in the title be reason for termination?

    Good to see that you have improvement in the knee. It is amazing what has transpired over the last 60 years with physical therapy. A friend of mine has a book written in 1951 called “Progressive Resistance Exercise”, written by Drs. Thomas DeLorme and Arthur L. Watkins. These two are the Godfathers of not only physical therapy, but also formed the basis of the modern day fitness training system. The wording is different, but essentially, their conclusions to fitness training were this: Lift a weight heavy enough to achieve X amount of reps. When you achieve that, add more resistance, lower to X amount of reps, and repeat.

    The doctors successfully treated numerous WW II vets who returned with serious injuries. That is the basis of their book, and in 1951, were laughed at by the medical community. 60 years later, they are largely forgotten for their contributions.

    I think people like Atkins, Taubes, Davis et al, in 50, 60 years, will be proven right, just as Delorme and Watkins were.

    I hope it doesn’t take that long.

    I was never worried much about the knee. My shoulder was so messed up after surgery some years ago, I didn’t think it would ever be normal again. After coming back from that, I figure the knee would be relatively easy, and it was.

  24. Marilyn

    Someone on Facebook just posted a quote by Stephen Hawking that really speaks to this we-know-better-than-you-what’s-good-for-you mentality of government, and now employers:

    “The greatest enemy of knowledge isn’t ignorance; it is the illusion of knowledge.”

    Love it. That ranks up there with “It ain’t so much the things we don’t know that get us into trouble. It’s the things we know that just ain’t so.”

  25. Rae

    Any time I read a government-approved “sample menu” I feel like I’m going to starve. How can people live on that? Woefully inadequate. This attitude of “eat as little as you possibly can” is sad and destructive. I eat FAR more fat and protein now than I did when I was obese. The body needs nutrition!

    It is sad. We’ve got countless people thinking they have to be miserable to keep their weight down.

  26. DebbieC.

    Back before I got laid off in 2010 the company I worked for also used to offer a “health assessment” test that included a questionaire about your eating habits. it was completely optional, but if you took it the company gave you $150, so I did it every year as why should I turn down $150 for 10 minutes worth of work. I got answers basically identical to Alexander’s every single year. Very likely my company used the same firm that his does to handle the assessments, so the boilerplate answers are all the same. They gave me the same naggy answer every single year and I just ignored it of course. It was impossible to answer with total accuracy though, as questions on things like grain consumption (for example) gave multiple choices like a. 4-5 servings a day, b. 1-4 servings a day, c. 12 or more servings a week, d. 1-12 servings a week …..

    Stuff like that, where NEVER was not even a choice, and you couldn’t leave any answers blank. But I did enjoy getting the $150. 🙂

    Take the money and then go out for a big steak dinner.

  27. Denny

    They chastise him for his horrendous dietary choices yet did they compare his blood work to everybody else’s? I bet his lipid profile would put all the others to shame. But hey, that doesn’t matter because myfoodplate.gov says what we should eat.

    Also, a diet void of grains which have nothing required by the body for health is better than a diet void of protein which is necessary for bodily function and life in general? Uhm, ok.

    They use surveys because surveys are cheap and easy. Blood work takes time and expense. So they’re taking simple over useful.

  28. gibson girl

    I also get questionnaires and “helpful” advice from my insurance company. It’s scary. Luckily, I’m retired now, so I can’t be fired, but the insurance company could easily raise my rates if they think I’m a “health risk”.

    @Marilyn: I love the concept of “sugar-free granola”! 🙂

    I would hope insurance companies would at least ask for some tests, not just go by a questionnaire.

  29. Rae

    Looking at the meals that were suggested there, my immediate thought for every single one was, “If I ate that I would be hungry again in less than an hour.” Also, it bothers me that people think veganism is healthy. Any diet where you are heavily and widely encouraged to take a B-12 supplement for energy is NOT healthy.

    You’d be hungry, and then they’d tell you not to eat.

  30. Marilyn

    Someone on Facebook just posted a quote by Stephen Hawking that really speaks to this we-know-better-than-you-what’s-good-for-you mentality of government, and now employers:

    “The greatest enemy of knowledge isn’t ignorance; it is the illusion of knowledge.”

    Love it. That ranks up there with “It ain’t so much the things we don’t know that get us into trouble. It’s the things we know that just ain’t so.”

  31. Karen P

    I’m so glad that I’m not the only person who was honest on my health questionnaire and received “bad marks” for both not eating wheat ( I’m grain sensitive) or having 3 dairy servings (I’m lactose intolerant and my allergies are much worse with dairy).

    REALLY? I have lost 72 pounds ( structured diet plan- commercial) and transitioned to a Primal/ Paleo style of eating. I’ve kept 72 pounds off for 8 months. Best blood work I’ve ever had. Healthiest I’ve ever been in my adult life.

    Sigh! Someday, the algorithms will be in our favor 😉 Karen P

    Let’s hope.

  32. DebbieC.

    Back before I got laid off in 2010 the company I worked for also used to offer a “health assessment” test that included a questionaire about your eating habits. it was completely optional, but if you took it the company gave you $150, so I did it every year as why should I turn down $150 for 10 minutes worth of work. I got answers basically identical to Alexander’s every single year. Very likely my company used the same firm that his does to handle the assessments, so the boilerplate answers are all the same. They gave me the same naggy answer every single year and I just ignored it of course. It was impossible to answer with total accuracy though, as questions on things like grain consumption (for example) gave multiple choices like a. 4-5 servings a day, b. 1-4 servings a day, c. 12 or more servings a week, d. 1-12 servings a week …..

    Stuff like that, where NEVER was not even a choice, and you couldn’t leave any answers blank. But I did enjoy getting the $150. 🙂

    Take the money and then go out for a big steak dinner.

  33. Denny

    They chastise him for his horrendous dietary choices yet did they compare his blood work to everybody else’s? I bet his lipid profile would put all the others to shame. But hey, that doesn’t matter because myfoodplate.gov says what we should eat.

    Also, a diet void of grains which have nothing required by the body for health is better than a diet void of protein which is necessary for bodily function and life in general? Uhm, ok.

    They use surveys because surveys are cheap and easy. Blood work takes time and expense. So they’re taking simple over useful.

  34. ChristineD

    I started a new very physically-intensive job 4 months ago with a large company and we have a quick shift meeting every morning, and it always includes a “health tip” about eating your oatmeal and low fat milk. Once in awhile it will mention eating “the good fats”, but that’s rare. It’s getting harder to just stand there lookin at my shoes when they spew their nonsense. I think its kinda weird that their giving us food choice advise, and bad at that. But I point out to people that I’m 46, can work circles around them and used to weigh 200 pounds before seeing “Fathead” about a year and a half ago. Now I’m 120 at 5’3, and its all due to avoiding oatmeal. I lost the 60 pounds in about 5 months. Thank you so much for your Docu-Com!

    Those are excellent results. It makes my day to hear Fat Head got you started on a better path.

  35. Bret

    I had to take a somewhat lengthy lifestyle / eating habits questionnaire as a prereq to my annual flight physical. It gave me the standard lecture about reducing my fat and getting my vegetables up to at least 5/day. That Friday at the club, after knocking a few back, I spotted the flight doc across the room and told him how laughable I found all that low-fat dieting advice on the computer. He smiled and said, “Me too. My Mediterranean diet is anything but low fat” (he is of Greek descent). Always a relief to discover our guys working in the system, even if covertly.

    Too bad it has to be covert. Maybe someday …

  36. Karen P

    I’m so glad that I’m not the only person who was honest on my health questionnaire and received “bad marks” for both not eating wheat ( I’m grain sensitive) or having 3 dairy servings (I’m lactose intolerant and my allergies are much worse with dairy).

    REALLY? I have lost 72 pounds ( structured diet plan- commercial) and transitioned to a Primal/ Paleo style of eating. I’ve kept 72 pounds off for 8 months. Best blood work I’ve ever had. Healthiest I’ve ever been in my adult life.

    Sigh! Someday, the algorithms will be in our favor 😉 Karen P

    Let’s hope.

  37. AG

    Does Alexander work for Boeing too? My health assessment sounds exactly like his! We have to get a health screening (blood pressure, cholesterol levels, etc.), and fill out a health assessment (asks about eating/exercise habits, stress, etc.) in order to avoid an extra $20 taken from each paycheck for our healthcare plans in 2013. I got an 84/100 score on my assessment because apparently I eat a lot of bad things like red meat, butter, and whole milk. My nurse said I must be genetically gifted because I have great cholesterol and triglyceride levels, but I should change my ways before my “luck” runs out! I just smiled and shook my head, I can’t even imagine how to start convincing some people…

    It’s amazing how many of us are genetically gifted.

  38. ChristineD

    I started a new very physically-intensive job 4 months ago with a large company and we have a quick shift meeting every morning, and it always includes a “health tip” about eating your oatmeal and low fat milk. Once in awhile it will mention eating “the good fats”, but that’s rare. It’s getting harder to just stand there lookin at my shoes when they spew their nonsense. I think its kinda weird that their giving us food choice advise, and bad at that. But I point out to people that I’m 46, can work circles around them and used to weigh 200 pounds before seeing “Fathead” about a year and a half ago. Now I’m 120 at 5’3, and its all due to avoiding oatmeal. I lost the 60 pounds in about 5 months. Thank you so much for your Docu-Com!

    Those are excellent results. It makes my day to hear Fat Head got you started on a better path.

  39. Bret

    I had to take a somewhat lengthy lifestyle / eating habits questionnaire as a prereq to my annual flight physical. It gave me the standard lecture about reducing my fat and getting my vegetables up to at least 5/day. That Friday at the club, after knocking a few back, I spotted the flight doc across the room and told him how laughable I found all that low-fat dieting advice on the computer. He smiled and said, “Me too. My Mediterranean diet is anything but low fat” (he is of Greek descent). Always a relief to discover our guys working in the system, even if covertly.

    Too bad it has to be covert. Maybe someday …

  40. AG

    Does Alexander work for Boeing too? My health assessment sounds exactly like his! We have to get a health screening (blood pressure, cholesterol levels, etc.), and fill out a health assessment (asks about eating/exercise habits, stress, etc.) in order to avoid an extra $20 taken from each paycheck for our healthcare plans in 2013. I got an 84/100 score on my assessment because apparently I eat a lot of bad things like red meat, butter, and whole milk. My nurse said I must be genetically gifted because I have great cholesterol and triglyceride levels, but I should change my ways before my “luck” runs out! I just smiled and shook my head, I can’t even imagine how to start convincing some people…

    It’s amazing how many of us are genetically gifted.

  41. Marilyn

    @Gibsongirl: The other advantage to using nuts for “granola” is that you’re less like to break a tooth on some hard, sugary clump — like I did twelve years ago BCR (before carb restriction).

  42. Mike P

    Either Alexander and I work for the same company, or our companies use the same health screening agency. My company does this every year and gives discounts on premiums to those who participate [$600/year for an individual or $1200/year for a couple in discounts]. While I shake my head at their advice, I use it as a time to help educate my coworkers on what the numbers really mean [not a lot] and how they can educate themselves [Robb Wolf books/website, Mark Sisson books/website, your documentary…to name a few]. A few have completely changed their habits so far.

  43. johnny

    I hate to say this but with the economy we currently have we are forced to lie on these diet questionnaires for an official health assessment to keep our jobs!

    Pathetic!

  44. Marilyn

    @Gibsongirl: The other advantage to using nuts for “granola” is that you’re less like to break a tooth on some hard, sugary clump — like I did twelve years ago BCR (before carb restriction).

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