Busted: Dietitians Scheme to Stifle Competition

File this under As If We Didn’t Know:

Awhile back I wrote about the dietitians who went after blogger Steve Cooksey for giving out dietary advice without a license.  They claim it was to protect the public.  I claim they’re full of it.  Their only interest is in protecting themselves.

Now Forbes magazine has published a follow-up article based on internal documents circulated within the American Dietetic Association, which someone leaked to Michael Ellsberg, a writer for Forbes.  Here’s part of what he wrote:

In these newly-available internal documents, which I quote and outline at length in this article, the American Dietetic Association:

  • Openly discusses creating and using state boards of dietetics/nutrition (including in NC and in every other state in the union) for the express purpose of limiting market competition for its Registered Dietitian members.
  • Openly discusses a nation-wide plan of surveilling and reporting private citizens, and particularly all competitors on the market for nutrition counseling, for “harming the public” by providing nutrition information/advice/counseling without a license—through exactly the same means by which Cooksey was reported to the NC Board. Again, for the explicit purpose of limiting marketplace competition.

After summarizing his original article about the attempt to stifle Cooksey, Ellsberg continues:

In the wake of that original article, I received an email from Judy Stone, Executive Director of the Michigan Nutrition Association, a coalition of Michigan nutrition consumers and practitioners. The subject line of her email to me was “ADA Smoking Gun Document. Naturally, I was intrigued.

Stone showed me a new internal document which had just been leaked to her from someone from within the ADA. This new document was far more detailed than the one I had access to when I wrote the last article. In the new document Stone showed me, the ADA openly strategizes on how to create NC-like licensure laws and dietetics boards across all 50 states, for the express purpose of limiting competition.

With this new document, there is now direct evidence linking the ADA’s stated desire to limit competition, to their legislative action (about which the ADA lies to the public, by saying the laws they are creating and lobbying for are designed to protect public safety, not limit competition.)

(Stone told me: “The ADA has not just angered non-dietetics nutrition professionals, but its own members as well, many of whom simply don’t want to be associated with this kind of power-grabbing under the guise of protecting the public. Willingness to share incriminating internal documents is one of the only ways for those members to effect change in their trade organization run amuck,” alluding to  additional documents she has ready to share.)

I’m glad to hear there are some ADA members who are troubled by this kind of nonsense.  Too often members of trade organizations seem determined to prove economist Milton Friedman’s observation that people have a limitless capacity to believe that whatever benefits them personally also benefits society as a whole.

The document opens boldly: the purpose of the document is to help allow “the profession of dietetics to be identified as the preferred and qualified provider of nutrition services.”

Preferred is a nice weasel word.  I sell a software program to law firms, and I’d certainly prefer they not buy from my competitors.  But I’m not out to prohibit them from preferring a competitor’s product.

The internal document then goes into what can only be described as a tirade against competitors:

“There is a proliferation of nutrition-related titles and credentials available to individuals seeking a foothold in the field. . . . Many aggressively challenge the notion that dietitians should have practice exclusivity outside of the clinical setting, and they continue pushing legislative initiatives that allow use of the “nutritionist” title and permit them to perform holistic and other nutritional counseling.”

The ADA further bemoans that. . .

“As government funding for preventative care and wellness increases and private insurers continue expanding clinical coverage to include visits to nutrition professionals, there will likely be a concomitant growth in the number of competitor health care professionals willing to provide some form of nutritional counseling. . . . Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians, Registered (DTRs) face a significant competitive threat in the provision of various dietetic and nutrition services.”

All of this is particularly bad, the professional association says internally, because:

“State affiliates [chapters of the ADA] have experienced organized opposition to licensure in all states in which current laws have been proposed. Grassroot opposition has been focused on the American Dietetic Association and has included arguments that dietitians lack preparation to delivery wellness and nutrition care outside of the hospital setting, that licensure creates a monopoly and restricts freedom of choice of provider by the public, creates job loss for non-RDs providers. . . and that licensure requires those who practice to be members of ADA (Appendix A). Rather than respond individually to these media campaigns, ADA can achieve a position of strength by developing and executing an initiative that supports licensure and the dietetics profession while adding member value. [Emphasis added]”

Notice the focus on “adding member value.” NOT “protecting the public” or “ensuring public safety” but “adding member value.” Again, spoken like a true professional association.

So far, the ADA is acting like pretty much every other professional association in existence: it wants special laws passed, conferring special rights and privileges on its members, for the express and primary purpose or limiting competitors and upstarts. Nothing new under the sun.

But here’s where it starts to get truly kooky.

The ADA, in this freshly-leaked document analyzed here, outlines a detailed policy of surveilling and reporting citizens who provide nutrition advice publicly, under state dietetics laws, for the primary purpose of maintaining, justifying, and strengthening the laws themselves:

“States generally require that someone file a complaint before an investigation into a violation can be opened; the complaint process is integral to aggressive enforcement of dietitian licensing acts. Because all too often state dietetics boards receive few (or no) complaints alleging violations, one is led to conclude either that (a) few, if any, violations are occurring in these states and licensing is not necessary or (b) violations are occurring, but are not being reported. If the latter scenario is accurate, dietitians and others benefitting from licensure must be more vigilant in identifying and reporting violations.”

The document says it plain and clear: the reason to surveil and report citizens who provide public nutrition advice (people like Steve Cooksey) is not that there’s any evidence that these citizens actually harm the public. Rather, the reason to surveil and report citizens like Cookey is that doing so is necessary to maintain licensure laws (which were designed by the ADA explicitly to limit market competition.)

Okay, you get the idea.  I’d suggest you read the rest of the Forbes article to get the full sense of what’s going on.  The ADA clearly wants to limit competition, but they’re smart enough to pitch the scheme to legislators as a means of protecting the public, even though nobody in the public is asking to be protected from unlicensed nutrition advisers.

So who should protect the public when it comes to nutrition advice?  Here’s a wacky idea:  let the public protect themselves.  Even without licensing laws, consumers have a habit of rewarding providers who do good work.  One of the subcontractors who did renovation work on our house wasn’t licensed.  But he was clearly more competent than the licensed subcontractor he replaced, so we brought him back for a number of jobs.

If people like Steve Cooksey, Mark Sisson, Jimmy Moore, Robb Wolf, Sean Croxton or Yours Truly give nutrition and health advice that works, we’ll draw loyal fans, customers, clients … whatever you want to call the people who reward our efforts.  If we give advice that doesn’t work, people looking to improve their health will go elsewhere.  That’s how it works in a world of wide-open competition.

And that’s what scares the hell out of the American Dietetic Association.


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80 thoughts on “Busted: Dietitians Scheme to Stifle Competition

  1. Ailu

    Awesome post. Always knew they were up to no good!

    Just an internal note: a bit of copy & paste has run amok on this post, you’ll catch it if you read over it

    Several people pointed that out. That’s what happens when I cut and paste at the end of a long day.

  2. Graham

    How else are you going to dupe people into getting a nutrition degree and then paying us to take an exam to get a few letter behind their name?

  3. Ailu

    Awesome post. Always knew they were up to no good!

    Just an internal note: a bit of copy & paste has run amok on this post, you’ll catch it if you read over it

    Several people pointed that out. That’s what happens when I cut and paste at the end of a long day.

  4. Elwin Ransom

    Gosh, I just loves me some Big Government intervention on my behalf. Yuck, yuck – Why, I’m so stupid, if’n it weren’t for all of these wonderful organizations around to tell me how to eat, sleep, work, and raise my childrens, I don’t know if’n I could I’d grow old enough to die.
    Yes-sirry-bob, I loves me some big nannies.

    And so it goes…

    “If people like Steve Cooksey, Mark Sisson, Jimmy Moore, Robb Wolf, Sean Croxton or Yours Truly give nutrition and health advice that works, we’ll draw loyal fans, customers, clients … whatever you want to call the people who reward our efforts. If we give advice that doesn’t work, people looking to improve their health will go elsewhere. That’s how it works in a world of wide-open competition.”

    Or to quote a wise man, “Sure, free enterprise works in practice, but will it work in theory?”

    Love it.

  5. Noelie

    I would like to go the other direction: for my money I can’t think of a more useless healthcare profession. Janitors are far more useful. I say we disband them.

    I say we just stop using their services. Then they’ll be disbanded, like it or not.

  6. Bullinachinashop

    This is just the tip of the iceberg because the Internet has served the people tremendously. The old guard who limited communications for fun and profit as well as those who used them to misinform us are going to do everything they can to stop it. This totally sounds conspiracy-crazy but it’s true.

    It doesn’t take a conspiracy nut to see what’s happening here. They’re scared by competition and want to stifle it.

  7. johnny

    The ADA, like the AMA and many others know their economics. Restrict supply and you can charge monopoly prices without government regulation.

    Not only are they fleecing the public and misallocating limited economic resources, they give ammunition to the cretins that come back stating that they are an example why capitalism does not work.

    Yup. Kind of like how the government completely skewed the housing market.

  8. Megan

    Tom, there is a repetition from the second extract….just to let you know!

    This kind of thing really winds me up. Interestingly, I watched the final instalment of the BBC program “the men who made us fat” last night. it was mostly about how to legislate to ensure that food companies provide us with food which is truly healthy (rather than just saying it is).

    there appears to be plenty of government departments who are happy to bring in legislation to prevent people making their own minds up about what they put in their mouths, yet the legislation required to prevent food companies telling us what to put in ours mouths is not necessary (according to government)

    So which is it? Are we responsible for what we put in our mouths and therefore responsible for the obesity epidemic. Which is handy for the food industry. Or should we only listen to the wise words of the government agencies when it comes to nutrition?

    They can’t have it both ways.

    I opt for deciding for myself what is wise to eat. the food companies will soon catch on and start providing what we want. Government and state nutritionists can keep out. They have proven themselves to be inept.

    I want government out of the food production business and the nutrition advice business.

  9. BawdyWench

    I went to a nutritionist once in the late 1990s (before I discovered the LC lifestyle). I had been keeping meticulous food and exercise journals for months and months. In all those months, I kept calories down around 1,000, virtually no protein, virtually no fat (lots of pasta with steamed vegetables … why, yes, I did gain weight … how did you know?).

    Anyway, she asked me what I had to eat the night before. Unfortunately, I had had 2 slices of pizza the night before, the first time in like 6 months. Rather than lie, I told her. “Well, you can’t expect to lose weight eating pizza every night!”

    I explained that this was the first time in 6 months that I’d had pizza, and if she’d only look at my food journal (which I’d brought), she’d see that. She flatly refused to look at my journal.

    Know what her great advice was? Every day I should eat a baloney sandwich on dry bread and have an apple with it. That’s it.

    No thanks.

    Of course she didn’t want to see your journal. It would have disproved everything she believed.

  10. Marilyn

    @LCNana: Thanks for the interesting historical tidbit!

    Tom wrote: “I say we just stop using their services. Then they’ll be disbanded, like it or not.” . . . Tom, if you’re speaking of nutritionists/dietitians here, that won’t happen any time soon. They have themselves too firmly entwined with the medical system. I know a Type II diabetic who not only sees a doctor, but also sees a dietitian regularly. And I recently read an article about a man who died of cancer. One of the hospital “staff” who showed up on the bill was a dietitian who came to the man in his last days/hours and told him he could expect to feel weaker. (!)

    (And don’t even get me started on the social worker who insisted she had the final word over everybody else — certainly the family! — on the location of an elderly patient after release from the hospital — another case of a group who have made made themselves “needed” in the medical system.)

    Unfortunately, yes, they’re often supported by insurance payments.

  11. Waldo

    The ADA clearly went about this the wrong way. If they want a monopoly, they need the lawyers and money of “BigAg”, like ADM or even Monsanto. It wouldn’t hurt to better partner with the USDA and promise a MyPlate mandate in return for legislation. They could of forged relationships with the “game masters” themselves, then they could bully everyone around just in time for Obamacare.

    I’m being facetious here of course. This is a serious matter. It is good this leaked out. The brevity of this to the Paleo/Primal/Ancestral health community is epic.

    BTW: We have a registered dietitian at our local grocery store. Outside her office she has a great big MyPlate poster on the wall. Perpetual insanity!

    Ugh.

  12. Susan

    Unfortunately, just as the ADA is attempting to justify itself, it has a willing audience in the various legislative bodies, whose members are also trying to justify their existence by passing laws to protect their constituents. If it weren’t for all the self-justifying legislation that gets proposed and often passed (Obamacare, anyone?), most of these legislative bodies could probably be cut down to part time operation with no harm to the public.

    Legislatures used to be part-time. The idea was to meet briefly, deal with government business, then go home and live in the world they created.

  13. Steve

    “As government funding for preventative care and wellness increases and private insurers continue expanding clinical coverage to include visits to nutrition professionals, there will likely be a concomitant growth in the number of competitor health care professionals willing to provide some form of nutritional counseling. . . . ”

    Clearly they see Obamacare, Romneycare, etc. increasing the dollars going to nutrition. So, they are making sure that their members get that money and not some unlicensed “hack” that actually knows what they are talking about, like Cookey. Also, the association can increase its power by getting more members because of the greater dollars thrown at nutrition by the government. Always follow the money.

    Yup. If they really wanted to increase their market share, they could try giving advice that works.

  14. Megan

    NC resident here! My sister-in-law was sent to a dietician here when she was young because she was gaining weight and no one could figure out why. When they arrived at the dietician’s office, my MIL and SIL discovered that the dietician was obese. The only advice she gave: don’t eat school lunch (my SIL packed her lunch anyway). Both my MIL and SIL later had weight loss success by limiting their carbs after doing their own research, no thanks to the advice of an ill-informed, overweight dietician. I’m so grateful for blogs like this one that have helped me to drastically change my own lifestyle as well as those of my friends and family.

    But the dietitian had a license! That’s all that should matter, according to the ADA.

  15. Stephanie

    As a person with a Master’s in Nutrition, this angers me. But, what I really want to contribute is that the ADA already works to incorporate RDs into legislation. Recently Ohio passed a law that legislates a la carte food sales in schools. The law was written so that only a RD can be the one that approves a particular school’s policy- not me with a Master’s in Nutrition, not a doctor, not a PhD – ONLY a RD. Bullcrap. Want to be really upset? Look who the ADA works with:
    http://www.eatright.org/corporatesponsors/

    Yup. It’s the same old story.

  16. LCNana

    Interesting, Tom. But as you say, nothing new under the sun.

    I highly recommend a little book by Hilaire Belloc called “The Free Press” written in 1918. He tracks the mess the press had become in his day, with devastating parallels to our time.

    He, and others like G K Chesterton, founded dozens of small papers and magazines which acted as a balance to the big papers. They had no advertisements and so were free to speak the truth – they were very successful but always either ignored or pilloried by “Big Press”. Over the past half century we’ve slid back to monopolies and single source news and attempts to stifle anyone who does not agree.

    In our day the internet does the same thing as these little papers and mags. = provide another voice. Thank goodness we have blogs like yours. Even when blogs provide information that is controversial or simply crazy we have a choice now at least!!!!

    I love the internet for exactly that reason. Without the internet, there would be no Fat Head. It was through internet searches that I began to realize how much of what we’ve been told about nutrition is wrong.

  17. Angele

    Yes and NO to your discussion. I agree the AMA is a farce and in bed with all the wrong people. I agree each INDIVIDUAL needs to educate him or herself on health options and take responsibility for their own actions. BUT always exceptions to rules. That is just what has worked well in my life and sounds like yours as well.

    But I am not a farmer and know nothing about having to produce food. When they need help from the government due to draughts etc. what is wrong with that? It is like the old people screaming….”make the government keep their hands off my medicare!!” WHAT? REALLY? Government helps people in need and that is great…..I think your message is needed as well……we are all in the soup together….but the ADA and AMA are not the ingredients we want or need…..

    Surely you realize our problem is over-production of food, not under-production? Farmers should be free to buy drought or flood insurance from anyone willing to sell it. They should not entitled to have the government confiscate your money to reimburse them for their crop failures any more than I should be able to take your money to reimburse myself if my software business fails.

    The unfunded forward liability for Medicare is between $50 trillion and $75 trillion over the next few decades depending on whose figures you use. We will never, ever be able to pay that bill, so the system will come crashing down. I wouldn’t offer that up as an example of a good government program. It’s going to bankrupt us.

  18. Deniece

    In the late 1990’s I went to a dietitian because I had just found out I was diabetic. I was given the ADA diet plan and was told to follow it and come back for a check up the next month. I followed the diet to the letter never once strayed. During the month, I was so hungry I could have eaten my arm and I gained 3 pounds. I went back for the check up and the woman called me a liar because I hadn’t done what she said and I had gained weight.

    I was then told to write everything down and bring that in on my next appointment. And they wanted to see me in 2 weeks. I had to eat 150 carbs a day for meals and 25 for my one snack. I was to consume almost no fat and only 1200 calories a day. I gained another 1.5 pounds. When she saw this I was told she couldn’t work with me anymore because I wouldn’t follow instruction. Boy did she make me feel like a failure. I tried to explain to her and the doctor but neither would listen.

    Now other doctors have tried to set up appointments with dietitians and I very firmly tell them no thank you, if I wanted my body screwed up I could do it myself for free, and not get insulted when it happened.

    That just shows how brainwashed these people are. You must have been lying because your results weren’t what her training insisted they would be.

  19. Ray

    Here is a quote from the comments section of the Forbes article that bears repeating:

    “It would be a mistake to think that the ADA’s corporate sponsors–which include both the food and pharmaceutical industry–and the current attempts by the ADA to monopolize nutrition counseling are unrelated. As a newly-minted RD (in NC, no less), I can attest to the pressure that both forces exert to ensure that RDs only recommend eating patterns that adhere strictly to USDA/HHS Dietary Guidelines that favor the industrialized production of vegetable oils and corn/wheat/soy products–and which benefits Big Pharma as our population becomes sicker and fatter on such a diet. The ADA relies on support from industry to promote its self-protecting agenda. The USDA/HHS rely on ADA-trained Registered Dietitians to confirm and promote their industry-friendly guidelines. This powerful nexus of government, industry, and professional licensure create an atmosphere of fear and intimidation both within and outside of the RD profession.

    Steve Cooksey’s big mistake was not giving out nutrition information or even providing nutrition counseling. His mistake was to recommend a way of eating–which happens to be highly effective, is supported by both biochemistry and scientific evidence, and which can result in the reduction or elimination of diabetes medications–that runs counter to the government and industrial interests which control, with the help of the ADA, our food and nutrition system in America.”

    Perfectly summed up.

  20. BawdyWench

    I went to a nutritionist once in the late 1990s (before I discovered the LC lifestyle). I had been keeping meticulous food and exercise journals for months and months. In all those months, I kept calories down around 1,000, virtually no protein, virtually no fat (lots of pasta with steamed vegetables … why, yes, I did gain weight … how did you know?).

    Anyway, she asked me what I had to eat the night before. Unfortunately, I had had 2 slices of pizza the night before, the first time in like 6 months. Rather than lie, I told her. “Well, you can’t expect to lose weight eating pizza every night!”

    I explained that this was the first time in 6 months that I’d had pizza, and if she’d only look at my food journal (which I’d brought), she’d see that. She flatly refused to look at my journal.

    Know what her great advice was? Every day I should eat a baloney sandwich on dry bread and have an apple with it. That’s it.

    No thanks.

    Of course she didn’t want to see your journal. It would have disproved everything she believed.

  21. Marilyn

    @LCNana: Thanks for the interesting historical tidbit!

    Tom wrote: “I say we just stop using their services. Then they’ll be disbanded, like it or not.” . . . Tom, if you’re speaking of nutritionists/dietitians here, that won’t happen any time soon. They have themselves too firmly entwined with the medical system. I know a Type II diabetic who not only sees a doctor, but also sees a dietitian regularly. And I recently read an article about a man who died of cancer. One of the hospital “staff” who showed up on the bill was a dietitian who came to the man in his last days/hours and told him he could expect to feel weaker. (!)

    (And don’t even get me started on the social worker who insisted she had the final word over everybody else — certainly the family! — on the location of an elderly patient after release from the hospital — another case of a group who have made made themselves “needed” in the medical system.)

    Unfortunately, yes, they’re often supported by insurance payments.

  22. jake3_14

    So, does this leaked memo matter to the Cooksey case, since NC already had a licensing law?

    It was officially a state board that went after him, so my guess is no.

  23. Waldo

    The ADA clearly went about this the wrong way. If they want a monopoly, they need the lawyers and money of “BigAg”, like ADM or even Monsanto. It wouldn’t hurt to better partner with the USDA and promise a MyPlate mandate in return for legislation. They could of forged relationships with the “game masters” themselves, then they could bully everyone around just in time for Obamacare.

    I’m being facetious here of course. This is a serious matter. It is good this leaked out. The brevity of this to the Paleo/Primal/Ancestral health community is epic.

    BTW: We have a registered dietitian at our local grocery store. Outside her office she has a great big MyPlate poster on the wall. Perpetual insanity!

    Ugh.

  24. Susan

    Unfortunately, just as the ADA is attempting to justify itself, it has a willing audience in the various legislative bodies, whose members are also trying to justify their existence by passing laws to protect their constituents. If it weren’t for all the self-justifying legislation that gets proposed and often passed (Obamacare, anyone?), most of these legislative bodies could probably be cut down to part time operation with no harm to the public.

    Legislatures used to be part-time. The idea was to meet briefly, deal with government business, then go home and live in the world they created.

  25. Megan

    NC resident here! My sister-in-law was sent to a dietician here when she was young because she was gaining weight and no one could figure out why. When they arrived at the dietician’s office, my MIL and SIL discovered that the dietician was obese. The only advice she gave: don’t eat school lunch (my SIL packed her lunch anyway). Both my MIL and SIL later had weight loss success by limiting their carbs after doing their own research, no thanks to the advice of an ill-informed, overweight dietician. I’m so grateful for blogs like this one that have helped me to drastically change my own lifestyle as well as those of my friends and family.

    But the dietitian had a license! That’s all that should matter, according to the ADA.

  26. Stephanie

    As a person with a Master’s in Nutrition, this angers me. But, what I really want to contribute is that the ADA already works to incorporate RDs into legislation. Recently Ohio passed a law that legislates a la carte food sales in schools. The law was written so that only a RD can be the one that approves a particular school’s policy- not me with a Master’s in Nutrition, not a doctor, not a PhD – ONLY a RD. Bullcrap. Want to be really upset? Look who the ADA works with:
    http://www.eatright.org/corporatesponsors/

    Yup. It’s the same old story.

  27. Ellen

    Me – one year ago 175lbs, bp 135/85. Me – today 135lbs, bp 102/72. How did I do it? By myself! No dieticians involved. Thanks to people like you on the internet Tom, Jimmy Moore, Dr. Davis, etc. starting w/ the Glycemic Load diet. Just had a “wellness” exam here at work today, I just participated for the free medical testing, wanted to see my bp and bloodwork after almost a year of low carb. If not for all the wonderful information available on the internet, I’d probably weigh 180 by now, which is what I weighed 9 months pregnant with my last child in 2000.

  28. Angele

    Yes and NO to your discussion. I agree the AMA is a farce and in bed with all the wrong people. I agree each INDIVIDUAL needs to educate him or herself on health options and take responsibility for their own actions. BUT always exceptions to rules. That is just what has worked well in my life and sounds like yours as well.

    But I am not a farmer and know nothing about having to produce food. When they need help from the government due to draughts etc. what is wrong with that? It is like the old people screaming….”make the government keep their hands off my medicare!!” WHAT? REALLY? Government helps people in need and that is great…..I think your message is needed as well……we are all in the soup together….but the ADA and AMA are not the ingredients we want or need…..

    Surely you realize our problem is over-production of food, not under-production? Farmers should be free to buy drought or flood insurance from anyone willing to sell it. They should not entitled to have the government confiscate your money to reimburse them for their crop failures any more than I should be able to take your money to reimburse myself if my software business fails.

    The unfunded forward liability for Medicare is between $50 trillion and $75 trillion over the next few decades depending on whose figures you use. We will never, ever be able to pay that bill, so the system will come crashing down. I wouldn’t offer that up as an example of a good government program. It’s going to bankrupt us.

  29. Deniece

    In the late 1990’s I went to a dietitian because I had just found out I was diabetic. I was given the ADA diet plan and was told to follow it and come back for a check up the next month. I followed the diet to the letter never once strayed. During the month, I was so hungry I could have eaten my arm and I gained 3 pounds. I went back for the check up and the woman called me a liar because I hadn’t done what she said and I had gained weight.

    I was then told to write everything down and bring that in on my next appointment. And they wanted to see me in 2 weeks. I had to eat 150 carbs a day for meals and 25 for my one snack. I was to consume almost no fat and only 1200 calories a day. I gained another 1.5 pounds. When she saw this I was told she couldn’t work with me anymore because I wouldn’t follow instruction. Boy did she make me feel like a failure. I tried to explain to her and the doctor but neither would listen.

    Now other doctors have tried to set up appointments with dietitians and I very firmly tell them no thank you, if I wanted my body screwed up I could do it myself for free, and not get insulted when it happened.

    That just shows how brainwashed these people are. You must have been lying because your results weren’t what her training insisted they would be.

  30. Ray

    Here is a quote from the comments section of the Forbes article that bears repeating:

    “It would be a mistake to think that the ADA’s corporate sponsors–which include both the food and pharmaceutical industry–and the current attempts by the ADA to monopolize nutrition counseling are unrelated. As a newly-minted RD (in NC, no less), I can attest to the pressure that both forces exert to ensure that RDs only recommend eating patterns that adhere strictly to USDA/HHS Dietary Guidelines that favor the industrialized production of vegetable oils and corn/wheat/soy products–and which benefits Big Pharma as our population becomes sicker and fatter on such a diet. The ADA relies on support from industry to promote its self-protecting agenda. The USDA/HHS rely on ADA-trained Registered Dietitians to confirm and promote their industry-friendly guidelines. This powerful nexus of government, industry, and professional licensure create an atmosphere of fear and intimidation both within and outside of the RD profession.

    Steve Cooksey’s big mistake was not giving out nutrition information or even providing nutrition counseling. His mistake was to recommend a way of eating–which happens to be highly effective, is supported by both biochemistry and scientific evidence, and which can result in the reduction or elimination of diabetes medications–that runs counter to the government and industrial interests which control, with the help of the ADA, our food and nutrition system in America.”

    Perfectly summed up.

  31. jake3_14

    So, does this leaked memo matter to the Cooksey case, since NC already had a licensing law?

    It was officially a state board that went after him, so my guess is no.

  32. Ellen

    Me – one year ago 175lbs, bp 135/85. Me – today 135lbs, bp 102/72. How did I do it? By myself! No dieticians involved. Thanks to people like you on the internet Tom, Jimmy Moore, Dr. Davis, etc. starting w/ the Glycemic Load diet. Just had a “wellness” exam here at work today, I just participated for the free medical testing, wanted to see my bp and bloodwork after almost a year of low carb. If not for all the wonderful information available on the internet, I’d probably weigh 180 by now, which is what I weighed 9 months pregnant with my last child in 2000.

  33. Sam Knox

    My rule of thumb is never take dietary advice from anyone who is a member of an organization that offers continuing education credits from the Coca-Cola Beverage Institute.

    Good rule.

  34. Susan

    Tom said: “It doesn’t take a conspiracy nut to see what’s happening here. They’re scared by competition and want to stifle it.”

    Someday I’d like to see an investigative report on the link between the FDA and CIA. As some may know, mind altering drugs were used by our government during the fifties cold war for all kinds of purposes both foreign & domestic, some theorizing that hallucinogens were larter introduced to an unsuspecting public en masse during the sixties in attempts to diffuse the counterculture movement (read The Harvard Psychedelic Club).

    Notwithstanding, how & why would such a powerful organization also be connected with our food? National security?

  35. Firebird7478

    “But the dietitian had a license! That’s all that should matter, according to the ADA.”

    And the elderly have drivers licenses. Doesn’t mean they should drive. 😉

  36. DrE

    As an endocrinologist who actually thinks about what my patients are doing and experiencing I learned a long time ago about the hypocrisy of BOTH ADA’s (American Diabetes/Dietetics Assoc). It saddens me to see these power struggles taken out on the patients we’ve all sworn to serve.

    Ultimately, at the end of the day, I live and breathe by the patients I’ve helped and relive nightmares of those I couldn’t. My worth is measured by this axiom, not the money I make nor the organizations that I belong to.

    While I don’t agree with any of the methods these organizations engage in, I also see plenty of damage done to my patients who follow charlatans.

    I know the patients will win this battle ultimately because as one commentator already stated, the internet is alive and well and educating everyone. And an educated patient is an engaged patient and there is where we will make real progress towards health.

    We need more doctors like you.

  37. Sam Knox

    My rule of thumb is never take dietary advice from anyone who is a member of an organization that offers continuing education credits from the Coca-Cola Beverage Institute.

    Good rule.

  38. Susan

    Tom said: “It doesn’t take a conspiracy nut to see what’s happening here. They’re scared by competition and want to stifle it.”

    Someday I’d like to see an investigative report on the link between the FDA and CIA. As some may know, mind altering drugs were used by our government during the fifties cold war for all kinds of purposes both foreign & domestic, some theorizing that hallucinogens were larter introduced to an unsuspecting public en masse during the sixties in attempts to diffuse the counterculture movement (read The Harvard Psychedelic Club).

    Notwithstanding, how & why would such a powerful organization also be connected with our food? National security?

  39. Firebird7478

    “But the dietitian had a license! That’s all that should matter, according to the ADA.”

    And the elderly have drivers licenses. Doesn’t mean they should drive. 😉

  40. DrE

    As an endocrinologist who actually thinks about what my patients are doing and experiencing I learned a long time ago about the hypocrisy of BOTH ADA’s (American Diabetes/Dietetics Assoc). It saddens me to see these power struggles taken out on the patients we’ve all sworn to serve.

    Ultimately, at the end of the day, I live and breathe by the patients I’ve helped and relive nightmares of those I couldn’t. My worth is measured by this axiom, not the money I make nor the organizations that I belong to.

    While I don’t agree with any of the methods these organizations engage in, I also see plenty of damage done to my patients who follow charlatans.

    I know the patients will win this battle ultimately because as one commentator already stated, the internet is alive and well and educating everyone. And an educated patient is an engaged patient and there is where we will make real progress towards health.

    We need more doctors like you.

  41. Sean

    “People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.”

    -Adam Smith

    That guy should write a book.

  42. AndreaLynnette

    Reading those leaked document quotes didn’t make me angry. It actually made me kind of happy. See, I already KNEW that this was how they felt. Reading it from their own hand didn’t change anything for me, except it’s another piece of concrete evidence.

    Living this lifestyle in the larger world, where not even your own family takes you seriously, can be hard. Trying to tell people that these organizations are NOT here to help you, they are here to support themselves, usually gets you called a conspiracy nut. So, for me, having this kind of evidence is something I can show to a friend or family member and say “if you don’t believe ME, maybe you’ll believe THEM.”

    And if they’re still not convinced, just accept being a healthy conspiracy nut.

  43. Phocion Timon

    Welcome to our brave new world of ObambiCare and our tax money being given to those pandering to our “leaders.” (I won’t dwell on those “leaders” that will themselves pocket the tax money.)

  44. Firebird7478

    DrE wrote:

    “An educated patient is an engaged patient and there is where we will make real progress towards health.”

    The problem is, a lot of doctors don’t want an educated patient, but rather, an obedient one.

  45. Sean

    “People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.”

    -Adam Smith

    That guy should write a book.

  46. AndreaLynnette

    Reading those leaked document quotes didn’t make me angry. It actually made me kind of happy. See, I already KNEW that this was how they felt. Reading it from their own hand didn’t change anything for me, except it’s another piece of concrete evidence.

    Living this lifestyle in the larger world, where not even your own family takes you seriously, can be hard. Trying to tell people that these organizations are NOT here to help you, they are here to support themselves, usually gets you called a conspiracy nut. So, for me, having this kind of evidence is something I can show to a friend or family member and say “if you don’t believe ME, maybe you’ll believe THEM.”

    And if they’re still not convinced, just accept being a healthy conspiracy nut.

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