Another “Good” Diet Produces Lousy Results

In the speech I gave at the Office of Research Integrity conference, I listed this as the first ingredient for creating a crisis in nutrition:

Doctors, nutritionists, researchers, medical industry trade groups, government agencies and other established authorities handing out dietary advice that flat-out doesn’t work very well for an awful lot of people.

Today I saw another example of that ingredient in action.  A co-worker who heard from another co-worker that I know a thing or two about nutrition and health sent an email asking if he could drop by for a chat.  When we talked, he explained that he’s confused because his latest blood-work results aren’t good, even though he’s following the kind of “healthy” diet his doctor told him he should.

We’ll look at the results in a moment.  First let’s look at his typical diet, which he printed out for me.

Morning
Water, lime and honey (2 glasses), two egg-white omelet with little salt, 1 chili.

Breakfast
Oatmeal with water and fat-free milk, glass of fat-free milk
or
Milkshake with fat-free protein powder, fat-free milk, orange juice, fiber, blue berries, black berries, strawberries

Lunch
Bunch of carrots, cucumber, tomato, 1/2 cup rice and curry
or
Spaghetti and vegetables

Snack
Wheat bread or plain bagel with jam (fat free), peanut butter.

Dinner
Two whole-wheat tortillas, curry, apple or another fruit, 1 glass fat free milk.  (The curry is usually vegetable curry, but includes a little chicken cooked in olive oil twice per week.)
or
Spaghetti and vegetables

Snack
Mix of cashews, almonds and raisins

Now there’s a diet that would make your average doctor or dietician stand up and cheer!  Mostly plant-based, egg whites instead of whole eggs, fat-free milk instead of whole milk, very low in fat, devoid of red meat, lots of vegetables, and high in “good” carbohydrates:  oatmeal, orange juice, fruit, rice, whole-wheat bread, whole-wheat tortillas, and spaghetti.  This is the kind of diet the USDA believes everyone should be eating — and by gosh, we probably would if only we weren’t so gluttonous …  or so stupid that the Food Pyramid confuses us.  It’s also the kind of diet the USDA is pushing in schools.

Now let’s look at a couple of my co-worker’s lipid panels.

Two years ago
Total cholesterol: 212
LDL: 133
HDL: 46
Triglycerides: 161

Two weeks ago
Total cholesterol: 212
LDL: 140
HDL: 38
Triglycerides: 168

Notice anything?  The guy has been following the diet he was told is good for him, but his triglycerides are up and his HDL is down.  Those numbers may not look particularly alarming individually, but his triglycerides/HDL ratio is pretty bad.

For those of you who don’t already know, the most reliable predictor of heart disease you can calculate from a lipid panel is the triglycerides/HDL ratio.  You want that ratio below 3.0, preferably below 2.0.  If the ratio is above 3.0, it’s more likely that your body is producing small, dense LDL.  If the ratio is below 2.0, it’s more likely that your body is producing large, fluffy LDL.  A high ratio can also be an indicator that you’re becoming insulin resistant.

Thanks to that diet full of “good” carbohydrates and low in fat, my co-worker’s triglycerides/HDL ratio is 4.42.  And by the way, he’s a lean guy:  5’5”, 142 pounds.  Nobody can blame these lousy results on overeating or being overweight.  As he told me, his doctor is a bit frustrated as well, seeing those lousy numbers in a lean guy who eats a “healthy” low-fat diet.

In my speech, I talked about a common sequence in the treatment of type 2 diabetes:  a doctor tells a patient to start following the American Diabetes Association diet, the patient does, his blood sugar continues to spiral out of control, so the doctor prescribes a drug.  Frankly, I don’t know how any doctor with a functioning brain can recommend the ADA diet and then be surprised at the lousy results.  A diet based on foods that are rapidly converted to glucose raises fasting glucose levels?  Duh!

But I understand why doctors believe a low-fat diet will reduce triglycerides, since triglycerides are fats.  What they fail to realize is that high fasting triglycerides are a response to excess carbohydrates.  Here’s Dr. William Davis, the author of Wheat Belly, explaining the process:

One of the most common triglyceride myths is that eating fats increases triglyceride. But that’s only a half-truth, since fats do indeed increase triglycerides-but only if triglycerides are measured after eating (i.e., in the postprandial period). The real story is that fats in the diet decrease triglycerides-at all other times except after a meal. The higher the fat content of your diet, the lower your triglycerides will be in a fasting blood draw. This has been well-established in numerous diet trials comparing low-fat with low-carbohydrate diets.

Here’s where it gets confusing: While dietary fats cause triglycerides to increase after eating, carbohydrates cause triglycerides to increase at all other times. This means that carbohydrates (starches), like breads, pasta, breakfast cereals, pretzels, crackers, potatoes, soft drinks, and candies increase fasting triglycerides if consumed habitually.

A carbohydrate food like bread actually contains very little triglyceride . . .  So why would bread cause triglycerides to increase? Because carbohydrates are converted to triglycerides in the liver.

The human body has little capacity to store carbohydrates. So it needs a method to store the energy of excessive carbohydrates. It does so by converting carbohydrates to triglycerides, which are then converted to fat, especially the fat in your abdominal region (visceral fat).

Not surprisingly, the quickest way to reduce high fasting triglycerides is to cut back on the carbohydrates.  The easiest way to raise HDL is to eat more fat (natural fat, that is).  But since most doctors don’t know that, they see someone with a lipid panel like my co-worker’s and immediately recommend a low-fat diet with lots of fruit and whole grains.  In other words, they hand out dietary advice that doesn’t work.  When the dietary advice fails, as it did for my co-worker, they reach for the prescription pad.

That’s why we have a crisis in nutrition.  That’s why the advice the “experts” are handing out has to change.


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136 thoughts on “Another “Good” Diet Produces Lousy Results

  1. Jo

    I had an interesting time at the doctor’s recently. My trigs came back fab, my HDL was out of this world but my LDL was too high. The practice nurse rang me to suggest that I came to see the doctor about going on a statin. I said no thanks, and she was fine but recommended I reduce the saturated fat in my diet. I didn’t argue, but I really wanted to say to her ‘what you mean raise my trigs and lower my hdl, no thanks’. Anyway, it occurred to me that there must be a cause for my high LDL. I live in NZ which has low levels of iodine and selenium in its soils. Guess what one sign of iodine deficiency is? Yep, you guessed it -raised LDL. I’m experimenting supplementing and will go back and get tested in a few months.

    We really have to learn to look after ourselves – our doctors won’t do it for us.

    Let us know how that turns out.

    Reply
  2. kat loves dogs

    his diet – that was painful. hope you set him straight! and give that poor man a real egg!

    I had a talk with him and sent him several articles on carbohydrates and triglycerides. He responded that he was going to try cutting back on the wheat and rice.

    Reply
  3. cancerclasses

    Doctors usually have brains, except for Dr Oz, & maybe Ornish but I digress, and sometimes their brains actually function, but like everybody else eating a high carb processed ‘food’ diet, if the doctors are eating like their patients do, or if they’re eating the way they tell their patients to eat, their brains are likely functioning on a very low level of their potential.

    The high carb processed food diet has and is creating a LOT of deranged & dysfunctional brain chemistry out there, it’s scary, especially when those people are in positions of power and authority. Every time I get on an airplane I wonder what the pilots had to eat in their last meal prior to piloting the plane, BAD time to go into a sugar crash or carb coma. Don’t know about you but I prefer my pilots to have fully functioning brains just in case there’s some kind of emergency.

    Oh, and happy flying.

    My other fear is that pilot is on a statin and has a cognitive failure during the flight. I’m glad commercial flights have co-pilots.

    Reply
  4. Erik

    This is all observational, anecdotal evidence, but whenever folks on low carb forums start talking about their lipids, I’m frequently amazed by how low their triglycerides are. Frequently, you’ll see people with triglycerides in the 40’s, where 150 is considered acceptable, and 100 is considered stellar by nutritionists / physicians on other forums.

    Yet, when I actually search online for tips on reducing triglycerides, I can usually only find recommendations to eat low fat and healthy whole grains.

    I’ll also sometimes ask the question, “what do you eat when you don’t want to feel so hungry?” The low carb / paleo types have tons of suggestions, usually involving high quality protein (a couple of eggs, or a piece of steak, or some jerky). The low fat types act like they don’t understand the question. “I didn’t think it was possible to not feel hungry.”

    Heck, when I Google the question, I find an article from a low-fat advocate, “Why Do You Feel Hungry After Eating Fruit?” Her answer (paraphrased): because your lazy body is craving junk food. My answer: because the calories from the fruit are nearly pure sugar, and you don’t have any protein in your meal.

    It’s not just anecdotal. Low-carb diets have been shown in clinical studies to dramatically lower triglycerides.

    Reply
  5. L. C. Burgundy

    That diet sounds like a recipe for malnourishment. How does he not feel like he’s starving from meal to meal? The poor guy is getting so little quality protein or fat.

    I’d certainly be hungry all the time.

    Reply
  6. Lori

    What’s worrisome to me about this diet is the lack of nutrients. There’s a lack of vitamins A (unless he’s eating enough carrots for a clutch of bunnies) and K, and they’re not absorbed well without dietary fat. Given the lack of meat, there’s little vitamin B-12, iron and zinc. All those grains are iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium antagonists. And of course, there’s the lack of fat (a necessary nutrient) and an abundance of carbohydrate (unnecessary).

    Even if such a diet succeeded in improving lipids and weight, it wouldn’t be healthy. Those improvements would come at the cost of what the missing nutrients do for you: wound healing, muscle function, red blood cell formation, proper mental function, skin health, bone density, and stamina, just to name a few things.

    Indeed. There’s a lot more to it than just a lousy lipid panel.

    Reply
  7. nonegiven

    My son called and said his LDL was too high. (His triglycerides were under 50 and HDL just over the limit.) I told him to cut back on the pasta, bread, rice, etc and eat plenty of saturated fat. He said “So you’re telling me to do the exact opposite of what the doctor said?” I asked him if it was direct or calculated and sent him to google the Iranian formula. He asked the doctor for a direct LDL. It was closer to the Iranian estimate than the Friedewald.

    Yup, it’s a shame, but often the key to getting healthier is to do the opposite of what the experts recommend.

    Reply
  8. Ghost

    So, did you put your co-worker on the right path? That poor guy! I feel for him, they kept telling me to eat like that, and I’d be so miserably hungry… ;_;

    (Also, thank you for that image of broccoli with butter on it in your film…totally had that with salmon tonight!)

    Myself, I’m becoming more and more impressed with just…how NICE and TOGETHER the Paleo/Primal thing has been bringing people. My friends and I are SO ENCOURAGING of each other in ways that we haven’t been before.

    I had a talk with him and sent him links to several articles. Now it’s up to him.

    Reply
  9. mezzo

    I am doing LCHF mostly. Last time I looked my trigs were 68 and the ratio was 0.7. Doctor nearly fell off his chair when he saw that.

    Then did he tell you to go on a low-fat diet?

    Reply
  10. Jo

    I had an interesting time at the doctor’s recently. My trigs came back fab, my HDL was out of this world but my LDL was too high. The practice nurse rang me to suggest that I came to see the doctor about going on a statin. I said no thanks, and she was fine but recommended I reduce the saturated fat in my diet. I didn’t argue, but I really wanted to say to her ‘what you mean raise my trigs and lower my hdl, no thanks’. Anyway, it occurred to me that there must be a cause for my high LDL. I live in NZ which has low levels of iodine and selenium in its soils. Guess what one sign of iodine deficiency is? Yep, you guessed it -raised LDL. I’m experimenting supplementing and will go back and get tested in a few months.

    We really have to learn to look after ourselves – our doctors won’t do it for us.

    Let us know how that turns out.

    Reply
  11. kat loves dogs

    his diet – that was painful. hope you set him straight! and give that poor man a real egg!

    I had a talk with him and sent him several articles on carbohydrates and triglycerides. He responded that he was going to try cutting back on the wheat and rice.

    Reply
  12. cancerclasses

    Doctors usually have brains, except for Dr Oz, & maybe Ornish but I digress, and sometimes their brains actually function, but like everybody else eating a high carb processed ‘food’ diet, if the doctors are eating like their patients do, or if they’re eating the way they tell their patients to eat, their brains are likely functioning on a very low level of their potential.

    The high carb processed food diet has and is creating a LOT of deranged & dysfunctional brain chemistry out there, it’s scary, especially when those people are in positions of power and authority. Every time I get on an airplane I wonder what the pilots had to eat in their last meal prior to piloting the plane, BAD time to go into a sugar crash or carb coma. Don’t know about you but I prefer my pilots to have fully functioning brains just in case there’s some kind of emergency.

    Oh, and happy flying.

    My other fear is that pilot is on a statin and has a cognitive failure during the flight. I’m glad commercial flights have co-pilots.

    Reply
  13. Erik

    This is all observational, anecdotal evidence, but whenever folks on low carb forums start talking about their lipids, I’m frequently amazed by how low their triglycerides are. Frequently, you’ll see people with triglycerides in the 40’s, where 150 is considered acceptable, and 100 is considered stellar by nutritionists / physicians on other forums.

    Yet, when I actually search online for tips on reducing triglycerides, I can usually only find recommendations to eat low fat and healthy whole grains.

    I’ll also sometimes ask the question, “what do you eat when you don’t want to feel so hungry?” The low carb / paleo types have tons of suggestions, usually involving high quality protein (a couple of eggs, or a piece of steak, or some jerky). The low fat types act like they don’t understand the question. “I didn’t think it was possible to not feel hungry.”

    Heck, when I Google the question, I find an article from a low-fat advocate, “Why Do You Feel Hungry After Eating Fruit?” Her answer (paraphrased): because your lazy body is craving junk food. My answer: because the calories from the fruit are nearly pure sugar, and you don’t have any protein in your meal.

    It’s not just anecdotal. Low-carb diets have been shown in clinical studies to dramatically lower triglycerides.

    Reply
  14. Anna

    Every time I see a standard diet like that, the amount of snacks always strike me. There seems to be a demand for eating in between meals with these diets. When I eat HFLC, I can easily get by on 2-3 meals a day. The only times I’d like a snack, is usually when there’s people visiting and it’s more of a social thing (or when I have a glass of wine…then I want something to snack on too).

    When I was still eating low fat, I think I opened the fridge at least 4 times a day, just to see if there was something for me to munch on. Usually there wasn’t, so I closed the door again. This just illustrates to me that I was hungry all the time, even though I did the “whole grains” thing.

    Now that I’m working in an office again, I’m very aware of how many people go for some kind of sugary/starchy snack around 3:00 PM.

    Reply
  15. L. C. Burgundy

    That diet sounds like a recipe for malnourishment. How does he not feel like he’s starving from meal to meal? The poor guy is getting so little quality protein or fat.

    I’d certainly be hungry all the time.

    Reply
  16. Lori

    What’s worrisome to me about this diet is the lack of nutrients. There’s a lack of vitamins A (unless he’s eating enough carrots for a clutch of bunnies) and K, and they’re not absorbed well without dietary fat. Given the lack of meat, there’s little vitamin B-12, iron and zinc. All those grains are iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium antagonists. And of course, there’s the lack of fat (a necessary nutrient) and an abundance of carbohydrate (unnecessary).

    Even if such a diet succeeded in improving lipids and weight, it wouldn’t be healthy. Those improvements would come at the cost of what the missing nutrients do for you: wound healing, muscle function, red blood cell formation, proper mental function, skin health, bone density, and stamina, just to name a few things.

    Indeed. There’s a lot more to it than just a lousy lipid panel.

    Reply
  17. helene

    Hi,

    Very informative. Thank you for caring so much for our health. There is one thing I could not figure out. I understood the HDL/triglycerides ratio but I could not figure out the total Cholestol number (212) How did this number come about?

    BTW: I live in Sweden en frequently follow your blog as well as The dietdoctor and Annika´s blog

    Total cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides are measured in the blood sample. LDL is calculated from those results. For people with low triglycerides (below 100), the LDL calculation is often wrong.

    Reply
  18. nonegiven

    My son called and said his LDL was too high. (His triglycerides were under 50 and HDL just over the limit.) I told him to cut back on the pasta, bread, rice, etc and eat plenty of saturated fat. He said “So you’re telling me to do the exact opposite of what the doctor said?” I asked him if it was direct or calculated and sent him to google the Iranian formula. He asked the doctor for a direct LDL. It was closer to the Iranian estimate than the Friedewald.

    Yup, it’s a shame, but often the key to getting healthier is to do the opposite of what the experts recommend.

    Reply
  19. Ghost

    So, did you put your co-worker on the right path? That poor guy! I feel for him, they kept telling me to eat like that, and I’d be so miserably hungry… ;_;

    (Also, thank you for that image of broccoli with butter on it in your film…totally had that with salmon tonight!)

    Myself, I’m becoming more and more impressed with just…how NICE and TOGETHER the Paleo/Primal thing has been bringing people. My friends and I are SO ENCOURAGING of each other in ways that we haven’t been before.

    I had a talk with him and sent him links to several articles. Now it’s up to him.

    Reply
  20. gallier2

    Jo, there’s another reason for high ldl, the formula used to calculate it (Friedenwald formula) overestimates it when tri-glycerides are below 100, and the lower it is, the higher the calculated ldl value is.

    Reply
  21. mezzo

    I am doing LCHF mostly. Last time I looked my trigs were 68 and the ratio was 0.7. Doctor nearly fell off his chair when he saw that.

    Then did he tell you to go on a low-fat diet?

    Reply
  22. Anna

    Every time I see a standard diet like that, the amount of snacks always strike me. There seems to be a demand for eating in between meals with these diets. When I eat HFLC, I can easily get by on 2-3 meals a day. The only times I’d like a snack, is usually when there’s people visiting and it’s more of a social thing (or when I have a glass of wine…then I want something to snack on too).

    When I was still eating low fat, I think I opened the fridge at least 4 times a day, just to see if there was something for me to munch on. Usually there wasn’t, so I closed the door again. This just illustrates to me that I was hungry all the time, even though I did the “whole grains” thing.

    Now that I’m working in an office again, I’m very aware of how many people go for some kind of sugary/starchy snack around 3:00 PM.

    Reply
  23. helene

    Hi,

    Very informative. Thank you for caring so much for our health. There is one thing I could not figure out. I understood the HDL/triglycerides ratio but I could not figure out the total Cholestol number (212) How did this number come about?

    BTW: I live in Sweden en frequently follow your blog as well as The dietdoctor and Annika´s blog

    Total cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides are measured in the blood sample. LDL is calculated from those results. For people with low triglycerides (below 100), the LDL calculation is often wrong.

    Reply
  24. gallier2

    Jo, there’s another reason for high ldl, the formula used to calculate it (Friedenwald formula) overestimates it when tri-glycerides are below 100, and the lower it is, the higher the calculated ldl value is.

    Reply
  25. LCNana

    Poor man! I’d be shaking and panicky with that much sugar in my blood. But one thing that jumps out at me is this quote:

    “But since most doctors don’t know that, they see someone with a lipid panel like my co-worker’s and immediately recommend a low-fat diet with lots of fruit and whole grains.”

    Doctors treat test results not PEOPLE.

    In my case my doctor refused to treat my “symptoms” of low thyroid because my “tests” did not show TSH was “high enough” – so as I see it I just was not sick enough – should have gone in when I was deathly ill – then my “test results” would be treatable! What a joke! Any wonder I do my own homework on the interwebs, and simply demand the medication I know I need! When I yelled a bit he gave me the prescription I know I needed. And guess what? My “symptoms” are resolving just fine!!!!

    Frankly, Tom, I’m starting to feel a little sorry for the medical profession. Thanks to blogs like yours and some other really good ones, we’re way out there – and they are not even interested in catching up, it seems to me.

    If science progresses one funeral at a time, perhaps it’s the same with the medical profession.

    Reply
  26. Marilyn

    I do wonder — if doctors practice what they preach about low fat, lots of grains and fruits and vegetables, yadayada — what does THEIR blood work look like?

    Good question.

    Reply
  27. ZergGirl

    I feel so lucky with our doctor….when I complained to him about my weight on my first visit, he picked up his pad, wrote something down, and handed it to me with the instructions “Read this”. It was Gary Taubes’ book “Why We Get Fat and What To Do About It”. It had the feeling of a conspiratorial moment, LOL. But that moment certainly put me on what I truly believe is the right road.

    I’m actually excited to get my blood work done this year! Can’t wait to see what happened to my numbers!

    Clone that doctor!

    Reply
  28. john

    I don’t know what kind of “respect” you get when someone asks about diet, but I find it almost impossible to have any sort of reasonable nutrition conversation with most people. Many cannot even fathom the thought of a high fat diet: at my work, everyone always tells me about “lean protein” and “healthy: all protein, no fat.” This happens despite them often seeing me fill my coffee cup 1/4 with cream and eating egg yolks. Then there are other people who listen closely but take it as opinion, and they are simply back to square one once they hear another “opinion” (likely a doctor or their “fit” friend who’s “really into that stuff and vegetarian”).

    Individuals just do not have very scientific minds and will likely not truly grasp the concept of reading scientific literature and coming to a conclusion. I refrain from giving advice to anyone not a close friend; I tell people the results of studies I’ve seen or explain a little of the physiology. There’s not much else to do when someone asks about their 75 year old mother who is on 5-10 drugs.

    That’s why I don’t give dietary advice to anyone who doesn’t ask.

    Reply
  29. Waldo

    It’s a shame that doctors have to follow their “guidelines” or they’ll get in trouble. Also what about when they do reach for the Rx pad? Hmmm, the Pfizer rep gave me a free membership to The Bagel of Month Club so I’m going to Rx Lipitor. Its all a racket. Don’t hate the player, hate the game. We need more Naturopathic Doctors that get it and won’t play by the establishments rules but by the facts.

    Indeed. And unfortunately, many doctors feel legal pressure to follow the established guidelines.

    Reply
  30. Jon

    I know this is old news to us, but I had to post this due to its hilarity. In the hospital I work in I found a book lying around the nurse’s station titled “Guide To Carbohydrate Counting.” It begins by explaining how carbs, protein, and fat affect blood sugar, and that insulin is neccesary in order to control blood sugar levels.

    It suggests to diabetics that they need to monitor the amount of carbohydrates they eat to control blood sugar. The laughing starts here. When discussing how nutrients affects blood sugar, it states, “Of these nutrients, carbohydrates have the most affect on blood sugar.” So, that’s great. They admit that carbs are what affect blood glucose the most. On the next page it says this, “You do NOT need to restrict the amount of carbohdyrates you eat. You need to supply your body with carbohydrates throughout the day to keep a consistent blood sugar level.” Yeah, consistently high is more like it.

    This is so stupid. How can doctors at the PhD level not understand such a basic physiological response? It’s so discouraging that they can be so mindless. I swear, if I didn’t play sports, lift weights, drive a car, or step out of the house, I wouldn’t pay for health insurance. Not only would I save about about $120 a paycheck, but I would save gas on driving to the doctor and my time by hearing absolute non-sense about weighloss and health.

    The end of my rant. Over and out.

    Sounds like the ADA guidelines. Same illogical conclusion.

    Reply
  31. Debra @ Blue Raven Wellness

    “If the ratio is above 3.0, it’s more likely that your body is producing small, dense LDL. If the ratio is below 2.0, it’s more likely that your body is producing large, fluffy LDL.”

    I’m very curious as to the biochemical explanation for the effect of TGs and HDL on the “fluffiness” of LDL. I believe it, but I want to know why! Can you explain?

    It’s not that high HDL and low triglycerides produce large, fluffy LDL in and of themselves. The dietary factors that produce high HDL and low triglycerides also happen to produce large, fluffy LDL. That’s why attempts at reducing heart disease by raising HDL with drugs have failed.

    Reply
  32. Jesrad

    Somebody hand the poor guy some bacon, stat !

    On a side-note, was he even a little grumpy ? I sure know I would be extra-grumpy from feeling starved non-stop from such a poor diet…

    He was quite friendly, but I don’t normally see him much. We’re on different floors.

    Reply
  33. Justin B

    I’ve had numerous co-workers come to me to ask nutritional advice. Most watched Fat Head (the easiest way I’ve found to introduce people to this information), and came in the next day ready to change their world. Now, months later, I constantly overhear those same people bragging about their whole grain granola bars or the limited fat content in their yogurt. I’m now not sure if our dietary discussions were just a dream I had…

    I’ve had the same experience. Some co-workers have told me how much they enjoyed Fat Head … then I see them eating chips and drinking sodas. Oh well.

    Reply
  34. Carrie @ 20-Something Homemake

    My mother studied nutrition in school and never lets me hear the end of it. She thinks that the notion of “heart healthy whole grains” is the end-all in nutrition. She also thinks that my consumption of lots of animal meat and saturated fat is going to kill me (though she doesn’t blatantly come out and say it). Oh, and she always attributes her weight loss to using canola oil and eating low fat products (but she’s always talking about how she needs to lose the weight she’s gained back).

    Poor thing. This is about the same diet as hers, it can’t keep her weight off, she’s always hungry, and a diet to her is one of extreme deprivation (that’s the only way she can lose weight now.)

    I drop 20 pounds in a month and keep it off eating eggs, bacon, hearty salds, butter, coconut oil and heavy whipping cream… and she says I’m just lucky.

    Keep being lucky — and remember, butter and bacon make you lucky.

    Reply
  35. Judy B

    One wonders when the medical profession is going to wake up? I, for one, am not holding my breath nor am I following their “advice!”

    Reply
  36. LCNana

    Poor man! I’d be shaking and panicky with that much sugar in my blood. But one thing that jumps out at me is this quote:

    “But since most doctors don’t know that, they see someone with a lipid panel like my co-worker’s and immediately recommend a low-fat diet with lots of fruit and whole grains.”

    Doctors treat test results not PEOPLE.

    In my case my doctor refused to treat my “symptoms” of low thyroid because my “tests” did not show TSH was “high enough” – so as I see it I just was not sick enough – should have gone in when I was deathly ill – then my “test results” would be treatable! What a joke! Any wonder I do my own homework on the interwebs, and simply demand the medication I know I need! When I yelled a bit he gave me the prescription I know I needed. And guess what? My “symptoms” are resolving just fine!!!!

    Frankly, Tom, I’m starting to feel a little sorry for the medical profession. Thanks to blogs like yours and some other really good ones, we’re way out there – and they are not even interested in catching up, it seems to me.

    If science progresses one funeral at a time, perhaps it’s the same with the medical profession.

    Reply
  37. John

    HDL=2.27, LDL=2.28, TG = 0.47 and my doc wants me on statins. I lecture him that LDL-C is a volume measurement and is inherently wrong, especially when you consider particle sizes fluctuations. “It’s more complicated than that John” and “I will not debate this with you.” Fine doc, but I won’t take statins, thank you very much.

    I need new .shoulder pads

    Of course he won’t debate it. He’s a doctor and therefore knows everything.

    Reply
  38. Marilyn

    I do wonder — if doctors practice what they preach about low fat, lots of grains and fruits and vegetables, yadayada — what does THEIR blood work look like?

    Good question.

    Reply
  39. Peggy Cihocki

    That guy is lucky he works with you and the co-worker who referred him to you. There are so many people out there who are not so lucky and keep on doing what the doctor says and getting more and more frustrated because they don’t know any better. Until they happen on your movie or sites like the ones you link to and others in this low carb blogosphere. Because I don’t see doctors changing any time soon.
    On another note, I was disappointed the other day to find out my friend, who had quit his statins because he heard in the news (confirming what I had been telling him) that statins cause cognitive issues and he was having some of them. Following this news, the doctor cut the scrip in half (but didn’t cut them out) which LOL the guy had already done, but my guy quit them altogether. But then he went back on them because his “his doctor insisted.” Mind you, he is in his mid 70s–totally out of the range of ages for which Statins are shown to be even slightly effective! Grrr.

    Let the doctor insist all he wants, then ignore him. That’s what I’d do.

    Reply
  40. Adam

    Do you happen to know his pre and post blood pressure levels? From your experience, how do LCHF vs HCLF diets affect blood pressure, if at all? I didn’t see anything related to blood pressure in your movie. Can you tell us how it affected your BP? Do you happen to know what your pre and post BP numbers were? Not sure if I just missed it. Thanks again for all you do Tom!

    He didn’t give me those figures, but low-carb diets often reduce blood pressure.

    http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20100125/low-carb-diet-lowers-blood-pressure

    My blood pressure remarkably stable. Last time I had it checked, it was 120/76.

    Reply
  41. Tyler

    Reading that article was painful enough Michael. Then I had to go and read some of the comments.

    We’ve got a lot of work to do. I should replace the padding on my desk.

    Reply

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