Odds and Ends …

      111 Comments on Odds and Ends …

On the Carbohydrates Can Kill Show – first of four

In the previous few weeks, I recorded four Q & A sessions with Dr. Robert Su and some Fat Head fans for the Carbohydrates Can Kill podcast.   It was fun having a chance to actually talk with people I mostly know only from the comments section of the blog.

The first of those podcasts is now available on Dr. Su’s site.

Shipping DVDs again tomorrow

Well, ya’ll gave us a good problem to have:  we ran through our stock of Fat Head DVDs earlier this week.  When we moved to our temporary residence in an apartment after buying the mini-farm, we brought along what we thought was a sufficient supply of DVDs and put the rest in storage.

When we went to fill orders on Tuesday, we realized we’d emptied our last box in the apartment.  Chareva made arrangements with the PODS facility to bring a POD out of storage, and I met one of our movers there this morning to partially unload the POD and retrieve more DVDs.

Did I say partially?  It was closer to completely.  As Murphy’s Law would dictate, the boxes of DVDs were all the way at the front of the POD — I mean literally up against the front wall.  So we pretty much unloaded and reloaded the whole thing.

We’ll get caught up on all of this week’s orders tonight and tomorrow.  I appreciate the strong and ongoing support for the film from all of you, even if it occasionally means I get dust on my clothes from moving boxes and furniture.

Speaking of support, a reader spotted my complaints about our international distributor in the comments section and emailed to ask if buying more copies of the international Fat Head DVD would just be putting money in their pockets instead of mine.

Nope.  The Fat Head International DVD we sell on the blog is the one we produced ourselves – precisely because the international distributor hasn’t done diddly and is, if anything, preventing Fat Head from receiving wider distribution.  (I may write more about that later.)  When you order the DVD from the blog, you’re ordering it from me, not them.

Meanwhile, the U.S. distributor that first put Fat Head on Amazon and in some stores has filed for bankruptcy.  That’s why there’s no U.S.-only version anymore.  Unfortunately, they’re going bankrupt while owing us nearly two years’ worth of royalties.  Poof … gone.

If cereal boxes were truthful

My nephew Eric  (the one whose doctor wants him on statins despite high HDL and low triglycerides) alerted me to this picture of an artist’s rendition of cereal boxes.

I love it.  An online news article about the cereal boxes had this to say:

If you live in the Los Angeles area and happen to be perusing the cereal aisle at the Venice location of mega-supermarket Ralph’s, you may find yourself confused. Gawker reports the manufacturer’s boxes have been replaced with contemporary artist Ron English’s “propaganda.”

… His attack on the products isn’t falling on deaf ears. The Wall Street Journal reported that General Mills is vigorously attempting to reformulate its cereals to reduce the sugar content.

Great.  If they can find a way to remove the sugar and the grains entirely, they might have a decent product to sell.

However, reducing sugar poses certain challenges: “Not only do the cereal’s frosted oats need to taste sweet enough to keep kids clamoring, they have to float in milk for at least three minutes,” states the article.

The goal for parents shouldn’t be to have kids who clamor.  The goal should be to have kids who are healthy.  My girls had sausage and eggs this morning and enjoyed them.  It didn’t occur to us to see if those foods will float in milk.


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111 thoughts on “Odds and Ends …

  1. Marilyn

    I agree with Andrea here. I’m a dedicated gluten-free low-carber. But these antics remind me very much of “The guy from CSPI” with a different target. I would hope that the low-carb community would continue to be a source of good information about good health, but would resist the temptation to forcefully “save the world.”

    Reply
  2. greensleeves

    I get Jaminet’s core idea that we need avoid starches with anti-nutrients and toxins such as lectins, etc. So starches without those are “safe.” The rest of his argument is a fog. Anytime someone can’t explain something simply, I begin to mistrust it. Even Einstein could explain special relativity in a way that an 8-year-old could get it. So I’m with Lori on this one. 🙂

    They may be safer, but I’m pretty sure my pre-agriculture Irish ancestors didn’t eat plantains and rice, so I’m sure I can live without them.

    Reply
  3. Janet

    Were you aware that the “obesity experts” met in Orlando the first week in Oct.?

    With their collective wheatbellies all gathered in the shadow of Disney World, this is what they came up with.

    http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/OBESITY/

    Not much mention of what foods were actually causing obesity. Seems they have spent their time checking zip codes and traffic patterns, home packed school lunches, mothers with small children not exercising (ask your wife if she is less active with small children in your home), mother’s weight gain during pregnancy, sleep apnea, doctors not doing nutrition counseling (can’t teach what they don’t know), and reading calorie counts on menus.

    Wouldn’t you like to know who sponsored this conference in paradise?

    My guess would be big food, big pharma, or both.

    Reply
  4. Drew @ Willpower Is For Fat Pe

    @Lori:

    Anybody who spends that on cereal shouldn’t complain about the cost of real food like sausage and eggs.

    Someone pointed me at this chart a while back showing the cost per-pound of junk food compared to real food. And multiple commenters kept saying it was a bogus comparison. “Why would you compare organic chicken to a candy bar?” Umm … because you eat them, and one costs a whole lot more?

    @Dr Davis:

    What does a company do when they figure out that their entire revenue stream is based on deeply flawed products and deceptive advertising?

    That’s awfully generous of you to assume they don’t already know.

    Reply
  5. Jennifer Snow

    I started to laugh when I considered the various floating things that could be sold in place of cereal. Then I remembered this, and I REALLY started to laugh:

    “What do you burn apart from witches?”
    “MORE WITCHES!!!”
    *whap*
    “Wood?”
    “Good! So, why do witches burn?”
    “Because . . . because they’re made of wood?”
    “Good!”
    “So, how do we know if she is made of wood?”
    “Build a bridge out of her!”
    “Ahh, but can you not also build bridges out of stone?”
    “Oh yeah.”
    “Does wood sink in water?”
    “No . . . no, it floats! THROW HER INTO THE POND!!!”

    What else floats in water?”
    “Very small rocks.”

    Reply
  6. Underground

    I ate it all. Frankenberry and I were on a first name basis. Tony T. Tiger hung out a lot, Snap and Crackle were around, not to mention those Chex guys.

    And poptarts, plain, strawberry. Lots of poptarts. (which interestingly, the sales of strawberry poptarts spikes right before a hurricane is due to make landfall)

    And oatmeal, and grits and biscuits and toast… On and on.

    Usually the only days I didn’t have some completely carb laden breakfast were on the weekends when I was with my grandmother. Bacon or sausage and eggs in the big cast iron skillet. But still accompanied by biscuits and jam or butter.

    And to think we reached a point where we felt guilty when we had the eggs and bacon.

    Reply
  7. Midwest Housefrau

    Its not exactly on the topic with cereal but I’m always entertained by the Beneful dogfood comemercials advertizing generous “whole grains and vegetables” for your dog’s health. Seriously now they want our pets? Last I checked, my dog only eats vegetation when she’s nauseous (dead raccoon does that).

    Amazing how they conveniently forget that dogs are natural carnivores.

    Reply
  8. Lynnanne

    Tom,

    If you were pushing “Carbs are Good” and “Eat More Grain”, you’d be rich now. Instead you’re fighting the good fight and keeping me from banging my head on MY desk because I know you’re banging your head on YOURS. (Is that insensitive?).

    So what happens to you? You lose your royalties. That really sucks. If I were you, I’d suspect The Guy From CSPI was behind your distributor going bankrupt. 🙂

    Anyway, I hit your tip jar. I’ll be ordering more Fathead movies to send to my friends and family. And I’ll be wearing my Wheat Is Murder T-shirt to the gym as soon as I get off the crutches. Wish I could do more.

    Thanks for everything you do!

    Um…if I order Fathead movies now, do you get the royalties?

    I guess I should’ve made a film blaming McDonald’s for the whole mess. Then the bigger distributors wouldn’t have turned down the film with notes saying they didn’t like my politics. (Yes, that happened a couple of times.)

    Anything you order from the blog goes directly to us.

    Reply
  9. Janet

    Were you aware that the “obesity experts” met in Orlando the first week in Oct.?

    With their collective wheatbellies all gathered in the shadow of Disney World, this is what they came up with.

    http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/OBESITY/

    Not much mention of what foods were actually causing obesity. Seems they have spent their time checking zip codes and traffic patterns, home packed school lunches, mothers with small children not exercising (ask your wife if she is less active with small children in your home), mother’s weight gain during pregnancy, sleep apnea, doctors not doing nutrition counseling (can’t teach what they don’t know), and reading calorie counts on menus.

    Wouldn’t you like to know who sponsored this conference in paradise?

    My guess would be big food, big pharma, or both.

    Reply
  10. Drew @ Willpower Is For Fat People

    @Lori:

    Anybody who spends that on cereal shouldn’t complain about the cost of real food like sausage and eggs.

    Someone pointed me at this chart a while back showing the cost per-pound of junk food compared to real food. And multiple commenters kept saying it was a bogus comparison. “Why would you compare organic chicken to a candy bar?” Umm … because you eat them, and one costs a whole lot more?

    @Dr Davis:

    What does a company do when they figure out that their entire revenue stream is based on deeply flawed products and deceptive advertising?

    That’s awfully generous of you to assume they don’t already know.

    Reply
  11. Midwest Housefrau

    Its not exactly on the topic with cereal but I’m always entertained by the Beneful dogfood comemercials advertizing generous “whole grains and vegetables” for your dog’s health. Seriously now they want our pets? Last I checked, my dog only eats vegetation when she’s nauseous (dead raccoon does that).

    Amazing how they conveniently forget that dogs are natural carnivores.

    Reply
  12. Dave

    Subsidy Free Lifestyle should be your next book/movie Tom. If the USA subsidizes it, stop using/ingesting it.

    btw, anyone going as the guy from CSPI for Halloween?

    No, we want to scare the kids, not terrorize them.

    Reply
  13. marilynb

    Who cares if it floats? I used to eat a lot of cereal dry, right out of the box. I thought it was SO much healthier than chips & cheese puffs.

    Reply
  14. Underground

    “Marilyn says:
    October 15, 2011 at 1:58 pm
    I agree with Andrea here. I’m a dedicated gluten-free low-carber. But these antics remind me very much of “The guy from CSPI” with a different target. I would hope that the low-carb community would continue to be a source of good information about good health, but would resist the temptation to forcefully “save the world.””

    It’s not like they’re hijacking cereal shipments and burning them in the road.

    People deserve to have factual information to base their decisions on. And they’re certainly not getting it from the government’s dietary guidelines. I think a little “surprise” factor can be helpful in getting people to look up out of a carb heavy mindset. Then all you can really do is point them at the facts and let them make their own decisions. Unless you’re the government, then you start punishing people for not toeing the line.

    The problem is that most people have no idea that what they’re being told by many people in positions of authority is pure hooey. There’s a big difference in trying to “forecefully” save anyone through legislation or otherwise, and getting people’s attention to your message.

    Reply
  15. Firebird

    “I guess I should’ve made a film blaming McDonald’s for the whole mess.”

    It’s been done. You should have made one and blamed Burger King.

    Now you tell me.

    Reply
  16. SallyMyles

    My God the royalties thing blows. Can’t remember when I bought my copy of Fat Head, but I had to buy a US version region 1 one, (having hacked my DVD player to be region free) as there didn’t seem to be a region 2 one available. I therefore hope I bought it before you got shafted on the royalties.

    We got shafted on most the royalties for the Fat Head DVDs bought through Amazon. For awhile we also sold the U.S. version through the blog, and we did collect the money for those … thank God.

    Reply
  17. marilynb

    Who cares if it floats? I used to eat a lot of cereal dry, right out of the box. I thought it was SO much healthier than chips & cheese puffs.

    Reply
  18. Underground

    “Marilyn says:
    October 15, 2011 at 1:58 pm
    I agree with Andrea here. I’m a dedicated gluten-free low-carber. But these antics remind me very much of “The guy from CSPI” with a different target. I would hope that the low-carb community would continue to be a source of good information about good health, but would resist the temptation to forcefully “save the world.””

    It’s not like they’re hijacking cereal shipments and burning them in the road.

    People deserve to have factual information to base their decisions on. And they’re certainly not getting it from the government’s dietary guidelines. I think a little “surprise” factor can be helpful in getting people to look up out of a carb heavy mindset. Then all you can really do is point them at the facts and let them make their own decisions. Unless you’re the government, then you start punishing people for not toeing the line.

    The problem is that most people have no idea that what they’re being told by many people in positions of authority is pure hooey. There’s a big difference in trying to “forecefully” save anyone through legislation or otherwise, and getting people’s attention to your message.

    Reply
  19. Firebird

    “I guess I should’ve made a film blaming McDonald’s for the whole mess.”

    It’s been done. You should have made one and blamed Burger King.

    Now you tell me.

    Reply
  20. SallyMyles

    My God the royalties thing blows. Can’t remember when I bought my copy of Fat Head, but I had to buy a US version region 1 one, (having hacked my DVD player to be region free) as there didn’t seem to be a region 2 one available. I therefore hope I bought it before you got shafted on the royalties.

    We got shafted on most the royalties for the Fat Head DVDs bought through Amazon. For awhile we also sold the U.S. version through the blog, and we did collect the money for those … thank God.

    Reply
  21. Underground

    Ok, my brain is full of… a word I won’t use here. I’ve been trying to go through the source studies used to propose the USDA dietary guidelines. What a load. Controls? We don’t need ’em. You get the answers you want when you only ask the same questions over and over again and taior those to your preconceptions.

    I think my favorite quote was how this USDA director (in fine bureaucratic fashion) answered the question without answering the question posed in this Scientific American article. I mean who cares ‘what’ you’re eating as long as you’re eating less of it right? Pfft.

    “Will the more recent thinking on fats and carbs be reflected in the 2010 federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans, updated once every five years? It depends on the strength of the evidence, explains Robert C. Post, deputy director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Findings that “have less support are put on the list of things to do with regard to more research.” Right now, Post explains, the agency’s main message to Americans is to limit overall calorie intake, irrespective of the source. “We’re finding that messages to consumers need to be short and simple and to the point,” he says. Another issue facing regulatory agencies, notes Harvard’s Stampfer, is that “the sugared beverage industry is lobbying very hard and trying to cast doubt on all these studies.”

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=carbs-against-cardio

    Reply
  22. Lynda NZ

    I just listened to your podcast on Hunting for Health. Excellent!! You covered everything clearly without sounding at all like a radical (which I am guilty of if anyone asks about low carb). I loved what you said about in the past there were gate keepers for information and now with the internet word gets out.

    My partner and I first got the message from accidentally watching your movie and yes, at that time there was a lot of information available on the internet to continue our search for information. Today however, the information is everywhere and many more qualified people are stepping up to talk about it.

    I’ll take accidental viewers along with all the others.

    Reply
  23. Lynda NZ

    I just listened to your podcast on Hunting for Health. Excellent!! You covered everything clearly without sounding at all like a radical (which I am guilty of if anyone asks about low carb). I loved what you said about in the past there were gate keepers for information and now with the internet word gets out.

    My partner and I first got the message from accidentally watching your movie and yes, at that time there was a lot of information available on the internet to continue our search for information. Today however, the information is everywhere and many more qualified people are stepping up to talk about it.

    I’ll take accidental viewers along with all the others.

    Reply
  24. Dave

    @Lori @Greensleaves

    If you believe vitamin-c deficiency was listed as a deficiency of no-carb eating, you really haven’t read properly and maybe shouldn’t comment about it 🙂

    I found the argument pretty simple. I have added safe starches back (by the way, 100g / 400 kcals is a huge portion if you don’t get it via the usual grains/twinkies/cereals, and which I usually don’t even reach) and feel much better than on no-carb, and am losing weight at the same rate as before.

    @Tom You can live without consuming nearly any glucose, of course, You know the story about the polish perfect dieters, eating no carbs for decades, and who got rewarded with high levels of gut cancer ? Not causation of course, but an open mind doesn’t hurt. You might find the discussion on Paul’s site about low carb dangers useful (there is a lot of value in the comments as well). It won’t hurt, bacon is still great.
    But the body _is_ a lean mean glucose processing machine, up until glycogen storage is full. The fat storage insulin leptin Taubes mechanism doesn’t kick in until that point is reached (and high carb reaches that all the time, of course), so what is bad about glucose until that point? Yes gluconeogenesis, but you don’t have protein stores other than lean mass so you need to be meticulate about diet and even timing, so why prefer it over simply eating the amount of glucose you’re forcing your body to generate anyway ? (honest question). You will mention BS, and Paul had a, in my opinion compelling, response to the BS angle.

    I don’t get why there are so many low carb kingdoms with their own sets of rules. You’re right about basically everything (IMHO) but I do find the safe starches theory to be compelling and working for me (and eaten with lots of eggs and meat and fat and vegetables and butter and coconut oil and grains are evil and all that).

    I don’t like to be wrong about something but I’d prefer to die wrong at 100 than right-in-my-mind at 70, so when presented with a compelling argument, I will change my ways. YMMV

    PS loved the movie and love the site. Jealous of your beautiful farm. Wish you well 🙂

    I don’t believe it’s necessary to go zero-carb. I did, after all, lose weight on my fast-food diet while consuming around 100 per day. I don’t believe high rates of gut cancer were found among Inuits, however, so I assume there’s more to the gut cancer issue than simply not eating carbohydrates.

    Reply
  25. Lynda NZ

    I just listened to your podcast on Hunting for Health. Excellent!! You covered everything clearly without sounding at all like a radical (which I am guilty of if anyone asks about low carb). I loved what you said about in the past there were gate keepers for information and now with the internet word gets out.

    My partner and I first got the message from accidentally watching your movie and yes, at that time there was a lot of information available on the internet to continue our search for information. Today however, the information is everywhere and many more qualified people are stepping up to talk about it.

    I’ll take accidental viewers along with all the others.

    Reply
  26. Dave

    @Lori @Greensleaves

    If you believe vitamin-c deficiency was listed as a deficiency of no-carb eating, you really haven’t read properly and maybe shouldn’t comment about it 🙂

    I found the argument pretty simple. I have added safe starches back (by the way, 100g / 400 kcals is a huge portion if you don’t get it via the usual grains/twinkies/cereals, and which I usually don’t even reach) and feel much better than on no-carb, and am losing weight at the same rate as before.

    @Tom You can live without consuming nearly any glucose, of course, You know the story about the polish perfect dieters, eating no carbs for decades, and who got rewarded with high levels of gut cancer ? Not causation of course, but an open mind doesn’t hurt. You might find the discussion on Paul’s site about low carb dangers useful (there is a lot of value in the comments as well). It won’t hurt, bacon is still great.
    But the body _is_ a lean mean glucose processing machine, up until glycogen storage is full. The fat storage insulin leptin Taubes mechanism doesn’t kick in until that point is reached (and high carb reaches that all the time, of course), so what is bad about glucose until that point? Yes gluconeogenesis, but you don’t have protein stores other than lean mass so you need to be meticulate about diet and even timing, so why prefer it over simply eating the amount of glucose you’re forcing your body to generate anyway ? (honest question). You will mention BS, and Paul had a, in my opinion compelling, response to the BS angle.

    I don’t get why there are so many low carb kingdoms with their own sets of rules. You’re right about basically everything (IMHO) but I do find the safe starches theory to be compelling and working for me (and eaten with lots of eggs and meat and fat and vegetables and butter and coconut oil and grains are evil and all that).

    I don’t like to be wrong about something but I’d prefer to die wrong at 100 than right-in-my-mind at 70, so when presented with a compelling argument, I will change my ways. YMMV

    PS loved the movie and love the site. Jealous of your beautiful farm. Wish you well 🙂

    I don’t believe it’s necessary to go zero-carb. I did, after all, lose weight on my fast-food diet while consuming around 100 per day. I don’t believe high rates of gut cancer were found among Inuits, however, so I assume there’s more to the gut cancer issue than simply not eating carbohydrates.

    Reply
  27. Becky

    I went to a family wedding this weekend. I looked fantastic, with all of my muscles that were built with unprocessed carbs, fat and protein and circuit training/ sprinting. My less-than svelte relatives were all talking about how they’re not cooking with oil any more, eating less and walking to lose weight. I didn’t say a word as I smeared butter on my grilled chicken to go with my salad. I was pleasantly surprised that the wedding menu consisted of a cheese & fruit appetizer bar, green salad, grilled chicken with a lemon caper sauce and mixed nuts with the cake. I just ate less of the sauce (I’m sure there were some thickening agents in it like flour), skipped the cake and the crackers. I’m pleasantly surprised that there was ample low-carb fare for me. I was expecting to have a massive cheat day. That’s one for the record books!

    Pretty good when you can survive a wedding without cheating.

    Reply
  28. Becky

    I went to a family wedding this weekend. I looked fantastic, with all of my muscles that were built with unprocessed carbs, fat and protein and circuit training/ sprinting. My less-than svelte relatives were all talking about how they’re not cooking with oil any more, eating less and walking to lose weight. I didn’t say a word as I smeared butter on my grilled chicken to go with my salad. I was pleasantly surprised that the wedding menu consisted of a cheese & fruit appetizer bar, green salad, grilled chicken with a lemon caper sauce and mixed nuts with the cake. I just ate less of the sauce (I’m sure there were some thickening agents in it like flour), skipped the cake and the crackers. I’m pleasantly surprised that there was ample low-carb fare for me. I was expecting to have a massive cheat day. That’s one for the record books!

    Pretty good when you can survive a wedding without cheating.

    Reply
  29. Brandon

    Hey there! I’m a recent “convert” to your “cult” up here in the Great White North 😉 I got to see Fat-Head on NetFlix about a month ago after trying the low-fat, grain heavy diets that got me nowhere and now it’s no more bagels and english muffins for breakfast. Bacon(the Canadian kind I’d cut back on for so long) and eggs all the way, so thanks for that.

    He he he, that cereal box picture is awesome, I’ve got a new desktop background now. He missed a few though, so I may have to draw up a bloated, dazed honey bee for Honey Nut Cheerios.

    Cheers!

    Cheers to you too.

    Reply
  30. Lori

    @Dave, “It happens that the incidence of kidney stones, glutathione deficiency, and vitamin C deficiency is increased on very low carb ketogenic diets for epilepsy, and other very low carb diets.” http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=4895

    Your body can make glucose out of dietary protein and so-called “junk protein.”
    http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/ketones-and-ketosis/ketosis-cleans-our-cells/ I don’t know what research the Jaminets used for their book, but Dr. Eades has dismantled a lot of low carb scare studies; so has Jenny Ruhl: http://diabetesupdate.blogspot.com/.

    The zero-carb idea is a bit of a straw man; I don’t think many people actually follow such a diet. A can of oysters has 8 grams of carb; a slice of beef liver has 3. Leafy greens have a few grams of sugar and starch as well; so do nuts. Even certain cheeses have some.

    @Drew, good post on the price of junk food v. real food.

    Reply
  31. Lori

    @Dave, “It happens that the incidence of kidney stones, glutathione deficiency, and vitamin C deficiency is increased on very low carb ketogenic diets for epilepsy, and other very low carb diets.” http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=4895

    Your body can make glucose out of dietary protein and so-called “junk protein.”
    http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/ketones-and-ketosis/ketosis-cleans-our-cells/ I don’t know what research the Jaminets used for their book, but Dr. Eades has dismantled a lot of low carb scare studies; so has Jenny Ruhl: http://diabetesupdate.blogspot.com/.

    The zero-carb idea is a bit of a straw man; I don’t think many people actually follow such a diet. A can of oysters has 8 grams of carb; a slice of beef liver has 3. Leafy greens have a few grams of sugar and starch as well; so do nuts. Even certain cheeses have some.

    @Drew, good post on the price of junk food v. real food.

    Reply
  32. Nowhereman

    @Dave:

    “btw, anyone going as the guy from CSPI for Halloween?”

    No. I mean how the hell is a fairly muscled guy like me going to pull off cosplaying as an emaciated corpse? 😛

    Reply
  33. Nowhereman

    @Dave:

    “btw, anyone going as the guy from CSPI for Halloween?”

    No. I mean how the hell is a fairly muscled guy like me going to pull off cosplaying as an emaciated corpse? 😛

    Reply
  34. Firebird

    Good interview! Good info on the aspartame. I think there will never be any conclusive information about its dangers. Too much lobbying to get it to market, and it was Donald Rumsfeld’s baby. I foresee commercials similar to the commercials in favor of HFCS, paid for by the corn refiners.

    Reply
  35. f8aw8su2

    I have been a proponent of low carb for years. It has ALWAYS worked but I have not stayed consistent, carb creep 🙁 Recently I reached an all time high in my weight and was disgusted, had heart burn all the time and felt like crap. I watched “Fat Head” with my husband and finally convinced him as well about the benefits of low carb. What was an eye opener for me was the wheat thing. Now it all makes sense. I have young kids (5 and 7) that are fighting it a bit, but I am gradually cutting wheat out of our diet and I started with cereal, they haven’t even missed it. They go to day care however and it is still served there. Sometimes I want to shake the rest of society! Uphill battle next is pizza.

    Eliminating wheat at home is still a big improvement.

    Reply
  36. Nickie

    I was at my son’s cub scout meeting last night, and they were going over everyone’s food log for the week and determining if they had eaten “heathy” or not. Honey Nut Cheerios was determined to be very healthy, especially with skim milk. Eggs and sausage, not so healthy. Toast wasn’t so bad—it was white, which is healthy for us in small portions—but the butter on it will kill you! My son, immediately spoke up, “No, butter is good for you”. To which the assistant leader immediately said “No, it isn’t.”

    my son:”yes it is”
    him: “no it isn’t”

    And on and on until he finally told my son to “be quiet and don’t argue.” Just sad. There were 9-10 9 year olds all being indoctrinated.

    Sheesh …

    Reply
  37. gallier2

    What I find quite perplexing about the carb reintroducers like Jaminets or Dr.Kurt Harris. No, let me rephrase that, it’s not them that are perplexing, because their arguments are right and true, but the low-carbers that are surprised by it. Have they not read their litlerature correctly? The pioneers of low-carb eating, be they Dr.Atkins or Dr.Lutz all had no problem with reintroducing carbs after some time on low-carb. Maintenance phase (phase 4) on Atkins allowed as much starch as could be tolerated without weight gain, this meant around the quantity Dr. Paul Jaminet proposes. Dr.Lutz had even a section in his book were he explained why you should never go below 74 g/day. Even Dr.Eades does not recommend a ketogenic diet for long term.
    So the whole critic against Dr.Jaminet is uncalled for, his recommendation is perfectly aligned with low-carb.

    I believe we can re-introduce carbs up to our individual tolerance level. I also believe we don’t need to re-introduce them if we feel fine without them.

    Reply
  38. Firebird

    Good interview! Good info on the aspartame. I think there will never be any conclusive information about its dangers. Too much lobbying to get it to market, and it was Donald Rumsfeld’s baby. I foresee commercials similar to the commercials in favor of HFCS, paid for by the corn refiners.

    Reply
  39. f8aw8su2

    I have been a proponent of low carb for years. It has ALWAYS worked but I have not stayed consistent, carb creep 🙁 Recently I reached an all time high in my weight and was disgusted, had heart burn all the time and felt like crap. I watched “Fat Head” with my husband and finally convinced him as well about the benefits of low carb. What was an eye opener for me was the wheat thing. Now it all makes sense. I have young kids (5 and 7) that are fighting it a bit, but I am gradually cutting wheat out of our diet and I started with cereal, they haven’t even missed it. They go to day care however and it is still served there. Sometimes I want to shake the rest of society! Uphill battle next is pizza.

    Eliminating wheat at home is still a big improvement.

    Reply
  40. John Doe

    Firebird,

    If you’re interested in learning about aspartame, read “Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills” by neurosurgeon Russell Blaylock. He talks about how the foundation aspartame studies, the studies upon which FDA approval and virtually all subsequent testimony that aspartame is safe are based, were horrifically flawed and distorted. Monkeys were force fed the test preparation until they vomited, thus removing most of the food from their stomachs prior to absorption and then the researchers examined sections of the brain other than those that were at high risk for damage from the aspartame. These are but a few of the transgressions, misrepresentations, and blatant oversights in the safety studies performed.

    The book is shocking and thorough and dispelled for me any doubts about the ills of aspartame (as well as a number of other similar products that cross the blood-brain barrier and excite neurons to death, including MSG and “hydrolyzed vegetable protein”).

    This is especially interesting to me because I used to work for a biotech company where we produced aspartame. One method used a fermentation process (using bacteria obtained from bovine nasal mucosa) and the other process used phosgene gas as an intermediary catalyst. Even after that I still consumed aspartame because it was purified and safe, right? It wasn’t until Dr. Blaylock’s book that I swore off aspartame forever.

    Reply
  41. Nickie

    I was at my son’s cub scout meeting last night, and they were going over everyone’s food log for the week and determining if they had eaten “heathy” or not. Honey Nut Cheerios was determined to be very healthy, especially with skim milk. Eggs and sausage, not so healthy. Toast wasn’t so bad—it was white, which is healthy for us in small portions—but the butter on it will kill you! My son, immediately spoke up, “No, butter is good for you”. To which the assistant leader immediately said “No, it isn’t.”

    my son:”yes it is”
    him: “no it isn’t”

    And on and on until he finally told my son to “be quiet and don’t argue.” Just sad. There were 9-10 9 year olds all being indoctrinated.

    Sheesh …

    Reply
  42. Lori

    “Maintenance phase (phase 4) on Atkins allowed as much starch as could be tolerated without weight gain, this meant around the quantity Dr. Paul Jaminet proposes.”

    From what I read on Jimmy Moore’s blog, the Jaminets recommend about 100 grams of carb per day. That’s a lot more than Dr. Atkins recommended. Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution, p. 102 states, “What do I mean by ‘drastically reduced’? I man an intake of well below 40 grams of carbohydrate per day. And that’s the upper limit. That’s where most of you will end your diet and start maintenance.” Page 263 states, regarding maintenance, “The best decision is probably to stay pretty much on the very low carbohydrate diet on which you lost….The second best decision is to add a few starches; a slice of melba toast, some of the starchy vegetables.” Page 119: “Though a few carbohydrate-sensitive people can maintain a reasonable weight on 60 grams of carbohydrates per day, my experience with thousands of such patients, as I said earlier, is that the majority find their Critical Carbohydrate Level to be 40 grams daily–or less. When they take in more than that, they get hungry–and then gain.”

    The Level 5 menus in the book don’t give carb counts, but they don’t look like they’d add up to 100 grams of carb per day. And not everyone can make it to Level 5. Even the dessert recipes, which do give that information, have carb counts in the low single digits per serving.

    I’m not trying to say that the Jaminets’ diet won’t work for some people. If you enjoy good health on their diet, I see no reason you shouldn’t continue. However, I’ve done well on a lower carb diet, and see no reason I shouldn’t continue as well.

    Carb tolerance is individual, indeed.

    Reply
  43. John Doe

    Firebird,

    If you’re interested in learning about aspartame, read “Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills” by neurosurgeon Russell Blaylock. He talks about how the foundation aspartame studies, the studies upon which FDA approval and virtually all subsequent testimony that aspartame is safe are based, were horrifically flawed and distorted. Monkeys were force fed the test preparation until they vomited, thus removing most of the food from their stomachs prior to absorption and then the researchers examined sections of the brain other than those that were at high risk for damage from the aspartame. These are but a few of the transgressions, misrepresentations, and blatant oversights in the safety studies performed.

    The book is shocking and thorough and dispelled for me any doubts about the ills of aspartame (as well as a number of other similar products that cross the blood-brain barrier and excite neurons to death, including MSG and “hydrolyzed vegetable protein”).

    This is especially interesting to me because I used to work for a biotech company where we produced aspartame. One method used a fermentation process (using bacteria obtained from bovine nasal mucosa) and the other process used phosgene gas as an intermediary catalyst. Even after that I still consumed aspartame because it was purified and safe, right? It wasn’t until Dr. Blaylock’s book that I swore off aspartame forever.

    Reply
  44. labrat

    Forgot my lunch last night and took a stab at trying to find something edible in the hospital cafeteria vending machine. I got a kick out of one sandwich, it was labeled. “BLT on Heart Healthy Whole Wheat”

    So bacan is okay as long as it’s on “heart healthy” bread – right?

    Reply
  45. Lori

    “Maintenance phase (phase 4) on Atkins allowed as much starch as could be tolerated without weight gain, this meant around the quantity Dr. Paul Jaminet proposes.”

    From what I read on Jimmy Moore’s blog, the Jaminets recommend about 100 grams of carb per day. That’s a lot more than Dr. Atkins recommended. Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution, p. 102 states, “What do I mean by ‘drastically reduced’? I man an intake of well below 40 grams of carbohydrate per day. And that’s the upper limit. That’s where most of you will end your diet and start maintenance.” Page 263 states, regarding maintenance, “The best decision is probably to stay pretty much on the very low carbohydrate diet on which you lost….The second best decision is to add a few starches; a slice of melba toast, some of the starchy vegetables.” Page 119: “Though a few carbohydrate-sensitive people can maintain a reasonable weight on 60 grams of carbohydrates per day, my experience with thousands of such patients, as I said earlier, is that the majority find their Critical Carbohydrate Level to be 40 grams daily–or less. When they take in more than that, they get hungry–and then gain.”

    The Level 5 menus in the book don’t give carb counts, but they don’t look like they’d add up to 100 grams of carb per day. And not everyone can make it to Level 5. Even the dessert recipes, which do give that information, have carb counts in the low single digits per serving.

    I’m not trying to say that the Jaminets’ diet won’t work for some people. If you enjoy good health on their diet, I see no reason you shouldn’t continue. However, I’ve done well on a lower carb diet, and see no reason I shouldn’t continue as well.

    Carb tolerance is individual, indeed.

    Reply
  46. labrat

    Forgot my lunch last night and took a stab at trying to find something edible in the hospital cafeteria vending machine. I got a kick out of one sandwich, it was labeled. “BLT on Heart Healthy Whole Wheat”

    So bacan is okay as long as it’s on “heart healthy” bread – right?

    Reply
  47. Nowhereman

    @ Dave and Tom

    I suspect one of the big factors, if what Dave is saying is true, is nitrates laden and smoked meats. Processed foods are still processed, even on a low-carb diet.

    Reply
  48. Nowhereman

    @ Nickie

    At what point did you get up and go explain to that guy why he was wrong about butter, eggs, and sausage? Maybe you should arrange for a special showing of “Fat Head” at a future Cub Scout meeting.

    Hear, hear!

    Reply

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