Free Wheat Bellies!

      148 Comments on Free Wheat Bellies!

Chareva was out at the farm this morning while I stayed home to record a podcast interview.  When the interview was over, I took off my headphones and became aware of an odd sound coming from the living room, where the girls were watching TV.  It was a crunching sound.

Are they eating nuts? I wondered.  Nope, I went looking for nuts last night while watching Sons of Anarchy.  No nuts in the house.  Bacon?  Nope … there was no cooked bacon around when I grabbed a cup of coffee before the podcast interview, and the girls wouldn’t dare fry bacon themselves.

When I went to investigate the mysterious crunching, I found the girls eating from a dish of dry cereal.

What the heck?! We don’t keep cereal in the house.  Was Chareva persuaded by the wheat-promoting troll who left all those nonsensical comments on my latest post about Wheat Belly? Did she decide to conduct a blind wheat challenge?

Turns out our Sunday newspaper had arrived with three free samples of cereal, courtesy of General Mills.  Nice of them to give away free health food … and I know it’s health food, because as you can see, the words Whole Grain appear on each box.

Realizing they were busted, the girls began negotiations.

“Can we eat these?  They’re just little boxes.”

“Nope.”

“How about if we just eat one box every day?”

“Nope.  Cereal is junk food.”

“Uh … can we split one box a week?”

“Okay, you can split one box, once per week.  That’s it.”

They had already finished half of the Wheaties.  Here’s what they were splitting:

That’s for 3/4 of a cup.  Back in the days when I thought whole-grain cereals were health food, I ate the stuff for breakfast.  But I never ate 3/4 of a cup and then said, “Boy, I’m full!”  I probably ate more like two cups, so I was starting my day with around 130 carbohydrates by the time I added the milk (low-fat, of course), but only 16 or so grams of protein and not much fat.  No wonder I was famished by noon.

When Chareva came home, we went to the county recreation center, where she and I usually take turns lifting weights while the girls swim.  A cute little girl who looked to be about four years old was also swimming.  When she got out of the pool, I noticed she (like her father) already had a pot belly.

I’ll bet they eat whole-grain cereals for breakfast.


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148 thoughts on “Free Wheat Bellies!

  1. Dr. Mark Niemchak

    Tom,
    Like you, I am an avid supporter of the low to no carb cause. So imagine my surprise when I clicked on your link to the Fat Head family Store and found a “sno-cone” maker and cotton candy machine! To say that I was shocked is an under statement -(Slap Me Naked and Hide My Clothes)- for gosh sakes!! Please explain and restore my faith.

    I’ll have a discussion with the missus, who put together the store. The girls have a sno-cone maker they use to make some kind of sugar-free sno-cones, but I can’t imagine a sugar-free use for a cotton candy machine.

    Reply
  2. mrfreddy

    I did a post on cold cereal awhile back, showcasing my own twist on my formerly beloved Cheerios: Porkios!

    http://beefandwhiskey.com/?p=329

    That’s the only thing close to cold cereal I eat these days. Even when I’m on a cheating bender, cold cereal still has little appeal to me.

    If you’d like to include a free sample of porkios in my paper on Sunday, I’m game.

    Reply
  3. John U.K

    Should have thrown it on the fire and cooked some bacon over it, that stuff burns real good! 😀

    Of course! Kindling.

    Reply
  4. Andrea Lynnette

    The title made me think that there was some sort of giveaway for ‘Wheat Belly.’ Sadness….

    My dad used to be a preacher, and he ran a paper route of several hundred houses. I remember how much I loved cereal giveaways as a kid, because we got to keep the extra bags, and there were always a dozen or more of them.
    Looking back, I realize now that I was disappointed, even at 5 or 6, with how small the samples were. I couldn’t imagine that this was ALL. We’d eat three of the little samples for one breakfast. And this was before they started cutting the sugar and switching to whole grains. I can’t imagine how much sugar I was getting every morning. No wonder I had ADHD.

    Establishing a serving size that is ridiculously small is a neat trick to make it look as if cereal is a low-calorie food. Anything is low-calorie if you eat so little of it, you’re guaranteed to be starving two hours later.

    Reply
  5. johnny

    It’s all a promotion to increase lagging sales of their products.

    I see a day in which your Sunday paper will include a loaf of bread.

    I was hoping for a free canned ham next time.

    Reply
  6. Raina

    Curious how the Wheaties affected them. If it affected them the way my splurge on Friday affected me, they won’t be wanting those other two boxes.

    Over 72 hours later, the 3 inch bloat from the plate of whole grains pasta is FINALLY completely gone. Imagine if I actually had some sort of gluten or wheat allergy!

    The seven-year-old stopped eating them before they were gone, telling me she was starting to feel some stomach discomfort.

    Reply
  7. Dr. Mark Niemchak

    Tom,
    Like you, I am an avid supporter of the low to no carb cause. So imagine my surprise when I clicked on your link to the Fat Head family Store and found a “sno-cone” maker and cotton candy machine! To say that I was shocked is an under statement -(Slap Me Naked and Hide My Clothes)- for gosh sakes!! Please explain and restore my faith.

    I’ll have a discussion with the missus, who put together the store. The girls have a sno-cone maker they use to make some kind of sugar-free sno-cones, but I can’t imagine a sugar-free use for a cotton candy machine.

    Reply
  8. Firebird

    Cheerios are being marketed as an important part of a regimen to lower cholesterol. While I use to eat Cheerios, I switched to rolled oats and ate a bowl every day for over 15 years. In that span, my cholesterol went from 190 to 336. Now I know why I didn’t pass the audition.

    Even if they do lower total cholesterol, that’s meaningless. Cholesterol doesn’t cause heart disease.

    Reply
  9. mrfreddy

    I did a post on cold cereal awhile back, showcasing my own twist on my formerly beloved Cheerios: Porkios!

    http://beefandwhiskey.com/?p=329

    That’s the only thing close to cold cereal I eat these days. Even when I’m on a cheating bender, cold cereal still has little appeal to me.

    If you’d like to include a free sample of porkios in my paper on Sunday, I’m game.

    Reply
  10. timmah

    Pro athletes who burn thousands of calories an hour don’t eat that junk. They eat fruits and nuts immediately following a workout/competition and then fatty cuts of meat with leafy greens. If it was a particularly long day in the trenches then they’ll have rice and potatoes and maybe a roll.

    They were eating paleo before it was cool.

    Self-coached amateurs eat that junk on the advice of “experts” quoted in magazines and books and advertisements in said magazines and commercials on ESPN.

    Me? I’ve broken my metabolic system through years of beer, pringles and mt. dew. When I eat like the “experts” say to, I “bonk” after 40 minutes of moderately intense cycling, which seems consistent with the amount of time it takes for my muscles to burn through self-stored glycogen.

    When I “fuel up” on 2-3 slices of “floppy” bacon and a couple eggs cooked in the resulting grease, I can train like the “normal people” for two hours, because the insulin spike from the banana isn’t bogarting the liver glycogen.

    Indeed, I remember reading a book about Chuck Bednarick (member of the Eagles who played both offense and defense, a true ironman) in which it mentioned that he kept to a diet of meats and greens.

    Reply
  11. Marissa

    Hey Tom!

    I’ve been perusing your blog for a while now, and figured I should just comment and say hello. I watched Fat Head with my boyfriend a couple of weekends ago. We both liked it a lot! I had already started trying out a low carb diet a couple of weeks beforehand, and now, to my surprise, he has started doing the same. This is a guy that ate more cereal than anyone I knew. He’s already having fewer sinus issues, and claims he can lift more weight in the gym. I’m personally doing pretty well with it. As a previous self-titled “Lover of Bread,” I hardly miss the stuff. I’m hoping to get rid of my remaining belly pooch and love handles!

    Speaking of cereal, I also found it literally impossible to stick to 3/4 cup or 1 cup or even 1 1/4 cup and not still be hungry. I could eat at least 3 or 4. One time I accidentally ate a whole box : I tried to be picky with cereals though, because even then, the amount of sugar and chemicals in the vast of majority of them just pissed me off. How is Total okay with marketing “100% DV of vitamins” and loading you with 14g of sugar per serving? For that reason, I ate a lot of shredded wheat, but I’d be hungry after 2 hours either way. Breakfast cereal has to be one of the easiest ways for Big Food to roll in the dough. $5/box vs. like $2 for eggs? Really? And here I was, thinking I was super healthy. Damn the temptation of easy prep whole grain.

    On a side note, I read about your farm in Franklin. How awesome! I’m in Nashville right now finishing a music business degree. We should have coffee sometime. Or steaks. I’m really good with either.

    It’s a deal. We hope to have a housewarming party soon and will be inviting friends and Fat Heads who live in the area.

    Reply
  12. Lynnanne

    Be Says:
    It drives me nuts that you can’t get whole milk anymore. Even at the Wisconsin State Fair! Now THAT’S messed up.
    The “healthy” section of my cafeteria at work sells non fat milk (and low fat chocolate milk), low fat cheese, and nonfat yogurt. Heck, I’d drink heavy cream if they sold that, but I”m not about to drink runny white sugar water. I’m the unhealthy lunatic who orders bacon and eggs for breakfast every day. The very large people ordering their healthy tater tots and pancakes gaze at me with pity. Bad enough the chef will only cook my eggs with “healthy” vegetable spray. She’s got a pan on the stove she calls “butter” (as in, can I ladle some “butter” on the pancakes that you’re about to cover with fake maple-flavored corn syrup?). I asked about it; it’s margerine. Underneath a sign that proudly claims they don’t use trans fats. When I suggested they use real butter, I might as well have been suggesting they coat my food with Draino. I tried ordering an omelet once. The chef pulled a paper carton of “liquid eggs” out of the refrigerator. When I asked what was in the “eggs”, she assumed it was because I wanted Egg Beaters, as of course I’d want to avoid those evil egg yolks. The “liquid eggs” was full of all kinds of “healthy” preservatives. There are tons (pun intended) of very, very large people here at work, some of whom can barely walk or fit in the chairs. I sit in meetings and listen to them still gasping for breath ten minutes after the exertion of taking the elevator from their desks to the conference room. Did I mention we’re a health insurance company?

    That pretty much says it all.

    Reply
  13. Andrea Lynnette

    The title made me think that there was some sort of giveaway for ‘Wheat Belly.’ Sadness….

    My dad used to be a preacher, and he ran a paper route of several hundred houses. I remember how much I loved cereal giveaways as a kid, because we got to keep the extra bags, and there were always a dozen or more of them.
    Looking back, I realize now that I was disappointed, even at 5 or 6, with how small the samples were. I couldn’t imagine that this was ALL. We’d eat three of the little samples for one breakfast. And this was before they started cutting the sugar and switching to whole grains. I can’t imagine how much sugar I was getting every morning. No wonder I had ADHD.

    Establishing a serving size that is ridiculously small is a neat trick to make it look as if cereal is a low-calorie food. Anything is low-calorie if you eat so little of it, you’re guaranteed to be starving two hours later.

    Reply
  14. Zachary

    At first I was surprised that you gave in to them eating any of it, then I thought back to how I used to eat as a kid, I realized it’s probably not so bad. I remember I used to eat cream of wheat with sugar and margarine added every morning. I pretty much can’t think of a meal that’s worse for you than that. Half a box a cereal once a week? Not so bad. Though I don’t know why they wanted that stuff anyway, it’s pretty tasteless.

    We don’t want to be food Nazis. I don’t think that’s good for them either. They’re allowed to have a treat now and then. So am I, for that matter.

    Reply
  15. Firebird

    Concrete Charlie played in the days prior to all this high carb, low fat nonsense. But, to speak to the point made by timmah, who wrote:

    “Pro athletes who burn thousands of calories an hour don’t eat that junk. They eat fruits and nuts immediately following a workout/competition and then fatty cuts of meat with leafy greens. If it was a particularly long day in the trenches then they’ll have rice and potatoes and maybe a roll.”

    I don’t what sport he plays or watches, but in my 18 years in sports broadcasting, I have edited news packages on football and hockey players discussing their pre-game meal, and it is nothing like he mentions.

    Typical of a hockey player’s pre-game meal is skinless, boneless chicken with A LOT of pasta, rice or potatoes. There may be some veggies in there, but they are consuming starches.

    I know of one hockey player, Nashville Predators’ defenseman, Shea Webber, who eats at the same restaurant every day on the way to the arena. Chicken and pasta, chicken and pasta. I don’t think I’ve seen anyone down a fatty steak. Their athletic trainers toe pyramid line.

    Reply
  16. Lynnanne

    By the way, it’s amazing the way your body starts to send appropriate hunger (or lack of hunger) signals after you’ve been low-carbing it for a while. Had foot surgery last week and there’s very little exercise you can do when you’re on crutches, you can’t get the incision wet, and you don’t want to tire out your arms any more than crutching around is already doing. I have NOT been hungry, presumably because my body doesn’t need the fuel. I eat a few bites of meat because it’s mealtime and my very nice fiance serves it to me, but then I’m done. Still, I’ve got plenty of energy and I’m crutching around the house like crazy just to burn it off. When I was still eating carbs, I could ALWAYS eat, even after I’d already eaten a meal (I’m not proud of that). I never understood those TV or movie characters who’d say that they were too upset to eat, or too distracted, or too busy or that they’d lost their appetites. I’d just think, “Well, give it here, I’LL eat it.” 🙂

    My experience exactly. I don’t count calories anymore, because my appetite controls itself naturally.

    Reply
  17. Raina

    Curious how the Wheaties affected them. If it affected them the way my splurge on Friday affected me, they won’t be wanting those other two boxes.

    Over 72 hours later, the 3 inch bloat from the plate of whole grains pasta is FINALLY completely gone. Imagine if I actually had some sort of gluten or wheat allergy!

    The seven-year-old stopped eating them before they were gone, telling me she was starting to feel some stomach discomfort.

    Reply
  18. Firebird

    Cheerios are being marketed as an important part of a regimen to lower cholesterol. While I use to eat Cheerios, I switched to rolled oats and ate a bowl every day for over 15 years. In that span, my cholesterol went from 190 to 336. Now I know why I didn’t pass the audition.

    Even if they do lower total cholesterol, that’s meaningless. Cholesterol doesn’t cause heart disease.

    Reply
  19. Bernardo

    Why can’t I find Fat Head on Netflix anymore? Sorry, for the off topic subject but i find it weird.

    If you’re in Canada, it’s because our slimeball international distributor (who we will soon be suing to terminate our contract) had it taken down.

    Reply
  20. Dan Hall

    Your Chuck Bednarick comment reminded me of something, that I heard yesterday. During yesterday’s telecast of the Eagles/49ers game , the announcers said that defensive end Jason Babin of the Eagles consumed a strictly Paleo diet. Of course they described it as being “strictly organic and preservative free,” but made no mention of meats or pre-agricultural foods. Babin had a good day, as opposed to the team. Collectively they coughed up a huge hairball and and lost. I’d love to see his teammates & coaches give Paleo eating a try and see if it improved their performances.

    That would be an interesting experiment.

    Reply
  21. Vicki Keber

    Tom – one of the interesting aspects of all this marketing are the so-called “coupon queens” we are hearing so much about. Yes – there are some that use coupons to collect closets full of toothpaste and shampoo, but the ones that our local news stations really play up are the ones who get a cart full of “food” for less than $20. When you see what is classified as “food”, then see these families and how heavy they are, well – you get the picture. As for cereal, for me, prior to Atkins in 05, it was THE most addictive food for me. I could sit and nosh on a box of “Chex” (didn’t matter which variety) until I was literally sick, but I still wouldn’t stop. Happy to report that neither Pot Roast nor cheeseburgers have that effect on me!

    I watched one of those coupon-queen shows once, and the lady had something like 50 boxes of cereal in her garage. Nothing like becoming fat and sick without spending much to do it.

    Reply
  22. timmah

    Pro athletes who burn thousands of calories an hour don’t eat that junk. They eat fruits and nuts immediately following a workout/competition and then fatty cuts of meat with leafy greens. If it was a particularly long day in the trenches then they’ll have rice and potatoes and maybe a roll.

    They were eating paleo before it was cool.

    Self-coached amateurs eat that junk on the advice of “experts” quoted in magazines and books and advertisements in said magazines and commercials on ESPN.

    Me? I’ve broken my metabolic system through years of beer, pringles and mt. dew. When I eat like the “experts” say to, I “bonk” after 40 minutes of moderately intense cycling, which seems consistent with the amount of time it takes for my muscles to burn through self-stored glycogen.

    When I “fuel up” on 2-3 slices of “floppy” bacon and a couple eggs cooked in the resulting grease, I can train like the “normal people” for two hours, because the insulin spike from the banana isn’t bogarting the liver glycogen.

    Indeed, I remember reading a book about Chuck Bednarick (member of the Eagles who played both offense and defense, a true ironman) in which it mentioned that he kept to a diet of meats and greens.

    Reply
  23. Paul B.

    I saw a pack of “bear naked” granola cereal in the store the other day (where the hell did they come up with that name?) 150 calories and about 30 grams of carbs per serving (much of it sugar). Guess what a “serving” was–1/4 of a cup! Barely enough to even cover the bottom of a bowl. My guess is that a good-sized bowl would be about 5-6 servings. And you’d still be hungry 2 hours later.

    Same for that Kashi “go lean” junk. I think a serving is like 1/2 cup. (“As much protein as an egg”–Arggh!). Takes about 4-5 servings to actually fill you up until your blood sugar crashes.

    If I’m supposed to consume a quarter-cup of a food and feel satisfied, it better be coconut oil.

    Reply
  24. Marissa

    Hey Tom!

    I’ve been perusing your blog for a while now, and figured I should just comment and say hello. I watched Fat Head with my boyfriend a couple of weekends ago. We both liked it a lot! I had already started trying out a low carb diet a couple of weeks beforehand, and now, to my surprise, he has started doing the same. This is a guy that ate more cereal than anyone I knew. He’s already having fewer sinus issues, and claims he can lift more weight in the gym. I’m personally doing pretty well with it. As a previous self-titled “Lover of Bread,” I hardly miss the stuff. I’m hoping to get rid of my remaining belly pooch and love handles!

    Speaking of cereal, I also found it literally impossible to stick to 3/4 cup or 1 cup or even 1 1/4 cup and not still be hungry. I could eat at least 3 or 4. One time I accidentally ate a whole box :\ I tried to be picky with cereals though, because even then, the amount of sugar and chemicals in the vast of majority of them just pissed me off. How is Total okay with marketing “100% DV of vitamins” and loading you with 14g of sugar per serving? For that reason, I ate a lot of shredded wheat, but I’d be hungry after 2 hours either way. Breakfast cereal has to be one of the easiest ways for Big Food to roll in the dough. $5/box vs. like $2 for eggs? Really? And here I was, thinking I was super healthy. Damn the temptation of easy prep whole grain.

    On a side note, I read about your farm in Franklin. How awesome! I’m in Nashville right now finishing a music business degree. We should have coffee sometime. Or steaks. I’m really good with either.

    It’s a deal. We hope to have a housewarming party soon and will be inviting friends and Fat Heads who live in the area.

    Reply
  25. Lynnanne

    Be Says:
    It drives me nuts that you can’t get whole milk anymore. Even at the Wisconsin State Fair! Now THAT’S messed up.
    The “healthy” section of my cafeteria at work sells non fat milk (and low fat chocolate milk), low fat cheese, and nonfat yogurt. Heck, I’d drink heavy cream if they sold that, but I”m not about to drink runny white sugar water. I’m the unhealthy lunatic who orders bacon and eggs for breakfast every day. The very large people ordering their healthy tater tots and pancakes gaze at me with pity. Bad enough the chef will only cook my eggs with “healthy” vegetable spray. She’s got a pan on the stove she calls “butter” (as in, can I ladle some “butter” on the pancakes that you’re about to cover with fake maple-flavored corn syrup?). I asked about it; it’s margerine. Underneath a sign that proudly claims they don’t use trans fats. When I suggested they use real butter, I might as well have been suggesting they coat my food with Draino. I tried ordering an omelet once. The chef pulled a paper carton of “liquid eggs” out of the refrigerator. When I asked what was in the “eggs”, she assumed it was because I wanted Egg Beaters, as of course I’d want to avoid those evil egg yolks. The “liquid eggs” was full of all kinds of “healthy” preservatives. There are tons (pun intended) of very, very large people here at work, some of whom can barely walk or fit in the chairs. I sit in meetings and listen to them still gasping for breath ten minutes after the exertion of taking the elevator from their desks to the conference room. Did I mention we’re a health insurance company?

    That pretty much says it all.

    Reply
  26. Zachary

    At first I was surprised that you gave in to them eating any of it, then I thought back to how I used to eat as a kid, I realized it’s probably not so bad. I remember I used to eat cream of wheat with sugar and margarine added every morning. I pretty much can’t think of a meal that’s worse for you than that. Half a box a cereal once a week? Not so bad. Though I don’t know why they wanted that stuff anyway, it’s pretty tasteless.

    We don’t want to be food Nazis. I don’t think that’s good for them either. They’re allowed to have a treat now and then. So am I, for that matter.

    Reply
  27. Firebird

    Concrete Charlie played in the days prior to all this high carb, low fat nonsense. But, to speak to the point made by timmah, who wrote:

    “Pro athletes who burn thousands of calories an hour don’t eat that junk. They eat fruits and nuts immediately following a workout/competition and then fatty cuts of meat with leafy greens. If it was a particularly long day in the trenches then they’ll have rice and potatoes and maybe a roll.”

    I don’t what sport he plays or watches, but in my 18 years in sports broadcasting, I have edited news packages on football and hockey players discussing their pre-game meal, and it is nothing like he mentions.

    Typical of a hockey player’s pre-game meal is skinless, boneless chicken with A LOT of pasta, rice or potatoes. There may be some veggies in there, but they are consuming starches.

    I know of one hockey player, Nashville Predators’ defenseman, Shea Webber, who eats at the same restaurant every day on the way to the arena. Chicken and pasta, chicken and pasta. I don’t think I’ve seen anyone down a fatty steak. Their athletic trainers toe pyramid line.

    Reply
  28. Lynnanne

    By the way, it’s amazing the way your body starts to send appropriate hunger (or lack of hunger) signals after you’ve been low-carbing it for a while. Had foot surgery last week and there’s very little exercise you can do when you’re on crutches, you can’t get the incision wet, and you don’t want to tire out your arms any more than crutching around is already doing. I have NOT been hungry, presumably because my body doesn’t need the fuel. I eat a few bites of meat because it’s mealtime and my very nice fiance serves it to me, but then I’m done. Still, I’ve got plenty of energy and I’m crutching around the house like crazy just to burn it off. When I was still eating carbs, I could ALWAYS eat, even after I’d already eaten a meal (I’m not proud of that). I never understood those TV or movie characters who’d say that they were too upset to eat, or too distracted, or too busy or that they’d lost their appetites. I’d just think, “Well, give it here, I’LL eat it.” 🙂

    My experience exactly. I don’t count calories anymore, because my appetite controls itself naturally.

    Reply
  29. ReduceCrapohydrates

    Can’t believe no-one here has mentioned the “Special K Challenge”,the one size fits all sugar diet.

    2X30g bowls with 100ml skim milk 2X~173kcal=346kcal
    2Xspecial k snacks 2X~90=180kcal
    1Xsensible meal ~400kcal
    fruits and veggies ~200kcal
    ———————————
    grand total -1126kcal

    only women who have a BMI over 25 are allowed do the challenge so a 5’4 woman must weight atleast 144lbs to be above “normal weight”.Presuming she does light exercise as is encouraged by the company she needs to eat 1981kcal to maintain her weight.

    So she’ll either:
    1) have hunger pangs all day and lose with a deficit of 855
    2)overestimate her portions and not lose weight
    3)get fed up and binge on the box after about day 3.

    Who could honestly eat 30g and just put the box away?This challenge would be possible using a high volume with a boring taste but with special k she doesn’t stand a chance.People can lose weight eating carbs but it’s dreadfully inefficient with low volume foods.

    I guess “challenge” is the correct word … as in “starving yourself is challenging.”

    Reply
  30. Nancy

    Re: Kashi cereals, “as much protein as an egg.” Whoopee. And how many carbs in the form of sugar? Why not eat as much protein as three eggs and forget the sugar?

    And in addition to the danger of wheat by itself, let’s add the toxicity of the can:

    A new study by the Breast Cancer Fund shows that the dangerous toxic chemical BPA appears in a wide variety of canned foods specifically marketed towards kids like Campbell’s Disney Princess Cool Shapes Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth and Campbell’s Toy Story Fun Shapes noodles. BPA is linked to breast cancer, obesity, prostate cancer, learning disabilities, infertility, and more!

    And re: not-good-for-you-food appearing from seemingly everywhere (albeit not directly from the food manufacturers), these messages arrived from two separate coworkers this morning:

    “I brought in a big bag of candy bars today and also plan to bring in some caramel swirl brownies in the next day or two.”

    “I brought some cinnamon bread and a blueberry strudel this morning. It’s on the table between Diane and Ellen.”

    I just had a co-worker offer me free cookies today. I politely said no.

    My copy of Wheat Belly just arrived today as well!!

    Reply
  31. cTo

    I was just saying in a post on the MDA forums today, when I was a kid I got yelled at for wanting to eat chicken skin, or not cutting all the fat off my steak, or asking for mom to try cooking dark meat instead of light. I was always hungry, and since there was no fat in the house (not even butter, we were 100% margarine) I was forced to sneaking into the pantry to steal spoonfuls of sugar and making my own “pastry dough” out of flour and water. Yes, I would basically eat handfuls of raw wheat flour between meals. All because eating too much chicken skin might kill me.

    Imagine how those new taxes on high-fat food will affect people.

    Reply
  32. Bernardo

    Why can’t I find Fat Head on Netflix anymore? Sorry, for the off topic subject but i find it weird.

    If you’re in Canada, it’s because our slimeball international distributor (who we will soon be suing to terminate our contract) had it taken down.

    Reply
  33. Dan Hall

    Your Chuck Bednarick comment reminded me of something, that I heard yesterday. During yesterday’s telecast of the Eagles/49ers game , the announcers said that defensive end Jason Babin of the Eagles consumed a strictly Paleo diet. Of course they described it as being “strictly organic and preservative free,” but made no mention of meats or pre-agricultural foods. Babin had a good day, as opposed to the team. Collectively they coughed up a huge hairball and and lost. I’d love to see his teammates & coaches give Paleo eating a try and see if it improved their performances.

    That would be an interesting experiment.

    Reply
  34. Vicki Keber

    Tom – one of the interesting aspects of all this marketing are the so-called “coupon queens” we are hearing so much about. Yes – there are some that use coupons to collect closets full of toothpaste and shampoo, but the ones that our local news stations really play up are the ones who get a cart full of “food” for less than $20. When you see what is classified as “food”, then see these families and how heavy they are, well – you get the picture. As for cereal, for me, prior to Atkins in 05, it was THE most addictive food for me. I could sit and nosh on a box of “Chex” (didn’t matter which variety) until I was literally sick, but I still wouldn’t stop. Happy to report that neither Pot Roast nor cheeseburgers have that effect on me!

    I watched one of those coupon-queen shows once, and the lady had something like 50 boxes of cereal in her garage. Nothing like becoming fat and sick without spending much to do it.

    Reply
  35. Underground

    Come on kids, the first one’s free! Have to keep the future customers hooked you know.

    I was just wading through some of the “research” listed as the basis for the government’s food recommendations this weekend. Did you know that whole grains lower your blood sugar? Compared to what I’m not exactly sure. Apparently total carbohydrate intake isn’t considered a confounding factor when trying to determine someone’s blood glucose response to their diet.

    And yes, I used to eat from the Jethro bowl. Staying away from that unhealthy fat, I had to eat at least half a box or more of healthy whole grain cereal just to be satisfied for a little while. Last night by contrast was a flank steak cooked in coconut oil with a few serranos, fresh salsa, big scoop of sour cream, and slices of avoado and tomato.

    Bring on the Frankenberry!

    They pull that one all the time: whole grains produce less of a glucose spike than white flour, so that means whole grains lower blood sugar. Makes as much sense as saying beer makes you sober, since it’s not as intoxicating per ounce as gin.

    Reply
  36. Underground

    Avocado. Yes, I know how to spehl it.

    One other thing I was surprised at the other day, was sour cream that’s not sour cream. The store brand was a whole bunch of things other than cream. I’m not sure exactly what, I think I went momentarily blind with surprise.

    On a rare trip to WallyMart recently I decided to peruse the high fat offerings and see what they had to offer. The coconut oil, 2 brands, one was mixed with hydrogenated vegetable oils. The other wasn’t, but it was outrageously expensive.

    The lard, was ALL full of vegetable shortening. Ironically when I checked out, there was a very overweight young man and his mother with a bucket of said fake lard and a couple bags of masa.

    Yuck.

    Reply
  37. Paul B.

    I saw a pack of “bear naked” granola cereal in the store the other day (where the hell did they come up with that name?) 150 calories and about 30 grams of carbs per serving (much of it sugar). Guess what a “serving” was–1/4 of a cup! Barely enough to even cover the bottom of a bowl. My guess is that a good-sized bowl would be about 5-6 servings. And you’d still be hungry 2 hours later.

    Same for that Kashi “go lean” junk. I think a serving is like 1/2 cup. (“As much protein as an egg”–Arggh!). Takes about 4-5 servings to actually fill you up until your blood sugar crashes.

    If I’m supposed to consume a quarter-cup of a food and feel satisfied, it better be coconut oil.

    Reply
  38. Walter B

    Long before I took up low carb I realized that nearly all the “food” that was discounted by coupon was junk. Just like almost everything advertised on TV is, if not junk, overpriced.

    That’s because it’s dirt-cheap to make, thanks in part to our government subsidizing grains.

    Reply
  39. Galina L.

    Our family is originally from Russia, living in Florida right now. We arrived into Canada first 15 years ago. It was fun and adventure to start to live in a new environment and try new foods. I tried sushi first time in my life, learned to cook Thanksgiving dinner, even took a sushi class in Vancouver,BC. We never manage to like any kind of cereal. We arrived with open not critical minds. We came to the conclusion that people were just carefully brainwashed and trained to eat that human kibble.At the beginning we enthusiastically tried all ready-to-eat things like pizza-pockets and frozen meals, but in one year we were tired from overflavored artificial food and returned to plain home-cooked meals.
    Attraction of Cafeteria food didn’t last long. My son was allowed to eat any junk he wanted when he visited other people and at school, at home we have nothing in a box.Why to be a food Nazi, it is not a religion what to eat. He grow to prefer home-cooked meals.

    @ Lynnanne
    I carry with me small containers of heavy cream and butter when I travel. You may carry your own butter or coconut oil and use it at lunch as well. I tell people I follow a special anty-migraine diet (it is true). It takes a judgment from their food choices. Invent some appropriate excuse, or better remember some disappearing health issue appropriate to mention, like skin condition. I am sure, with changing diet from standard to LC you don’t have to be too creative.

    Agreed; being a food Nazi can just create other problems. A once-in-awhile treat isn’t going to hurt them.

    Reply
  40. ReduceCrapohydrates

    Can’t believe no-one here has mentioned the “Special K Challenge”,the one size fits all sugar diet.

    2X30g bowls with 100ml skim milk 2X~173kcal=346kcal
    2Xspecial k snacks 2X~90=180kcal
    1Xsensible meal ~400kcal
    fruits and veggies ~200kcal
    ———————————
    grand total -1126kcal

    only women who have a BMI over 25 are allowed do the challenge so a 5’4 woman must weight atleast 144lbs to be above “normal weight”.Presuming she does light exercise as is encouraged by the company she needs to eat 1981kcal to maintain her weight.

    So she’ll either:
    1) have hunger pangs all day and lose with a deficit of 855
    2)overestimate her portions and not lose weight
    3)get fed up and binge on the box after about day 3.

    Who could honestly eat 30g and just put the box away?This challenge would be possible using a high volume with a boring taste but with special k she doesn’t stand a chance.People can lose weight eating carbs but it’s dreadfully inefficient with low volume foods.

    I guess “challenge” is the correct word … as in “starving yourself is challenging.”

    Reply
  41. Bridget

    I am taking a nutrition class as one of my courses this semester and thanks to you I can’t read my textbook without hitting my head on my desk. It’s full of fats are bad grains are good rhetoric. Sigh.

    I apologize. Perhaps you can wear a helmet to class?

    Reply
  42. Remnant

    Don’t you get it? Wheaties are designed to be a cereal for high-performance athletes. So by eating it, you are magically transformed into a high-performance athlete. Understand? It’s that simple.

    No wonder I was such a jock as a teenager …

    Reply
  43. Nancy

    Re: Kashi cereals, “as much protein as an egg.” Whoopee. And how many carbs in the form of sugar? Why not eat as much protein as three eggs and forget the sugar?

    And in addition to the danger of wheat by itself, let’s add the toxicity of the can:

    A new study by the Breast Cancer Fund shows that the dangerous toxic chemical BPA appears in a wide variety of canned foods specifically marketed towards kids like Campbell’s Disney Princess Cool Shapes Pasta with Chicken in Chicken Broth and Campbell’s Toy Story Fun Shapes noodles. BPA is linked to breast cancer, obesity, prostate cancer, learning disabilities, infertility, and more!

    And re: not-good-for-you-food appearing from seemingly everywhere (albeit not directly from the food manufacturers), these messages arrived from two separate coworkers this morning:

    “I brought in a big bag of candy bars today and also plan to bring in some caramel swirl brownies in the next day or two.”

    “I brought some cinnamon bread and a blueberry strudel this morning. It’s on the table between Diane and Ellen.”

    I just had a co-worker offer me free cookies today. I politely said no.

    My copy of Wheat Belly just arrived today as well!!

    Reply
  44. cTo

    I was just saying in a post on the MDA forums today, when I was a kid I got yelled at for wanting to eat chicken skin, or not cutting all the fat off my steak, or asking for mom to try cooking dark meat instead of light. I was always hungry, and since there was no fat in the house (not even butter, we were 100% margarine) I was forced to sneaking into the pantry to steal spoonfuls of sugar and making my own “pastry dough” out of flour and water. Yes, I would basically eat handfuls of raw wheat flour between meals. All because eating too much chicken skin might kill me.

    Imagine how those new taxes on high-fat food will affect people.

    Reply
  45. James Oliver Deckard

    I agree about not being so strict with the sprogs. Nothing worse than a fanatical parent. What are your thoughts on apple juice? I ask because I love the stuff. I eat a good amount of bacon, olives, feta cheese and anchovies so I get quite thirsty. Also after workouts. London (England) tap water is disgusting and I am too mean to buy bottled water – I use a water filter but much prefer glugging apple juice.

    I read somewhere on some GI index page that pressed apple juice , not from concentrate, has a low GI index. And when we talk about carbs, it’s the GI index that is really the issue with insulin spikes and whatnot, isn;t it?
    I can’t get hold of any low-carb ice-cream in England either. Even the Cornish icecream made with real clotted is also full of sugar and other questionable junk. The point (you and others have made) about fat being important in satiety needs to be emphasized more I think.
    Commiserations about your distributor. I’d like to see Fathead in shops over here. Maybe by the meat counter 😉

    We stopped buying apple juice a long time ago. Too much sugar. When we go out for a meal, they sometimes have apple juice.

    Reply
  46. Underground

    Come on kids, the first one’s free! Have to keep the future customers hooked you know.

    I was just wading through some of the “research” listed as the basis for the government’s food recommendations this weekend. Did you know that whole grains lower your blood sugar? Compared to what I’m not exactly sure. Apparently total carbohydrate intake isn’t considered a confounding factor when trying to determine someone’s blood glucose response to their diet.

    And yes, I used to eat from the Jethro bowl. Staying away from that unhealthy fat, I had to eat at least half a box or more of healthy whole grain cereal just to be satisfied for a little while. Last night by contrast was a flank steak cooked in coconut oil with a few serranos, fresh salsa, big scoop of sour cream, and slices of avoado and tomato.

    Bring on the Frankenberry!

    They pull that one all the time: whole grains produce less of a glucose spike than white flour, so that means whole grains lower blood sugar. Makes as much sense as saying beer makes you sober, since it’s not as intoxicating per ounce as gin.

    Reply

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