The Grain Producers Respond to ‘Wheat Belly’

Not surprisingly, the U.S. grain industry isn’t happy with Dr. William Davis and his just-released book Wheat Belly. The Grain Foods Foundation responded to the book with a press release and a blog post explaining why we all need grains to be healthy. Here are some quotes from their blog post.

Don’t be fooled by catchy terms like “wheat belly” and “bagel butt”….a fad diet is still a fad diet, no matter how you dress it up.

That’s why I’m no longer on a low-fat, grain-based diet. What a stupid fad that was.  Granted, I’d love to think avoiding the grains that make us fat and sick is the hottest new fad, but I’m pretty sure getting a tattoo on your (bagel) butt is still comfortably in the lead.

That’s exactly the story behind the new book Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health that was released today.

Actually, the story behind Wheat Belly is that wheat (especially today’s genetically modified wheat) pretty much sucks from a health standpoint.

As the old saying goes, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

What exactly is “too good to be true” about telling people they’ll have to give up a food that makes up a major portion of their diets – a food many of them love? Dr. Davis has had people leave his office in tears after telling them they couldn’t handle wheat and needed to stop eating it. I doubt many of them were thinking, “Well, this is just too good to be true!”

Cutting out one specific food is not only unrealistic, it’s dangerous.

Really? So if I cut refined sugar from my diet, that would be dangerous? I’m a dead man walking.

Omitting wheat entirely removes the essential (and disease-fighting!) nutrients it provides including fiber, antioxidants, iron and B vitamins.

Ahhh, that would explain why humans became extinct during the hundreds of thousands of years we didn’t consume wheat. Thank goodness those friendly aliens came to earth, planted wheat fields, then resurrected human life from some DNA samples they’d kept frozen.

Besides this, the advice dished out by Dr. Davis is completely counter to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the gold standard of scientifically-sound nutrition advice.

Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!!!!

Last time I checked, the gold standard in research consisted of randomized clinical studies in which the data actually supports the investigators’ conclusions. But if you folks want to re-define “gold standard” to consist of observational studies that often contradict the very advice they’re cited to support, be my guest … although I’d consider that more of a tin standard.

The Guidelines call for the average healthy American to consume six one-ounce servings of grain foods daily, half of which should come from whole grains and the other half from enriched grains.

So the government agency whose mission is to sell grains is telling us to eat grains. Well, that’s all the proof I need.

Wheat is the basis for a number of healthful whole and enriched grain foods including breads, cereal, pasta and wheat berries that provide valuable nutrients to the American diet and have been shown to help with weight maintenance.

Can’t argue with that one. Wheat will definitely help you maintain your weight … at, say, 40 pounds above where you’d like to be.

So, let common sense prevail. When it comes to nutrition advice, look to the real experts and remember that weight control is all about one key equation: calories in must equal calories out.

Use common sense? Look to the real experts? I thought you said you wanted us to listen to the USDA Dietary Guidelines Committee! Make up your minds already.

The good news is that there were dozens of comments on the post, nearly all of them negative, with many citing examples of how eliminating wheat caused health problems to vanish. Others pointed out that the Grain Foods Foundation didn’t actually dispute any of the science in Wheat Belly, which is true.

Dr. Davis wrote his own reply a few days later, which you can read here. As in the book, he made his arguments with logic and science. That prompted another reply by the Grain Foods Foundation:

Over the weekend we received a number of comments in response to our previous post, Our Perspective on “Wheat Belly” and we’d like to take a moment to address them.

Then why didn’t you? The rest of your post doesn’t answer any of the many criticisms leveled by people who left comments.

First, your comments weren’t being ignored. Comments on this blog are reviewed before they appear to prevent the posting of spam or profanity. There was no attempt to censor this feedback – our team was simply enjoying the long holiday weekend.

I’ll bet it was kind of depressing to enjoy a long weekend, then go to work on Tuesday and read dozens of comments left by people who basically kicked your bagel butts.

Second, there were comments questioning GFF’s funding sources. The Foundation is funded through voluntary donations from private grain-based companies and industry associations. However, any nutrition information we share is rooted in sound science and reviewed by independent nutrition experts from our Scientific Advisory Board.

Yes, I’m sure if your advisory board discovered, say, that celiac disease is five times more prevalent now than 50 years ago, they’d inform you immediately so you could bang out a press release announcing that you’ll stop producing mutant wheat.

Finally, some of you question the merit of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which are the gold standard of nutrition guidance in America.

The only reason we question those guidelines is that there’s nothing scientific about them, as even one of the committee members later admitted.

They are the most comprehensive review of the existing literature and are updated every five years to reflect new research. Every recommendation we share is based on these Guidelines. It is the most credible information available and we will continue to rely on them for our recommendations.

Let’s see … a government agency whose mission is to sell grains releases new guidelines every five years telling us to eat lots of grains … boy, I’m just stunned that the Grain Foods Foundation would continue to rely on the USDA for dietary advice.

So here’s how I’ve got it on my scorecard: Dr. Davis landed a flurry of punches in the form of hundreds of studies and dozens of case histories from his own medical practice. The Grain Food Foundation’s only counter-punch was to remind us that the USDA recommends eating grains.

If this were a fight, the ref would’ve stopped it halfway through the first round.


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210 thoughts on “The Grain Producers Respond to ‘Wheat Belly’

  1. earthmom

    Excellent work here! I do believe the grain manufacturers are scared by all this – but I believe their reaction will not be what is expected (or desired) but us. They won’t be shamed, or fix anything, they will launch a very expensive new marketing campaign ‘proving’ how healthy, safe and utterly delicious their poison products are!

    😛

    I think you can count on that.

    Reply
  2. WheatNoMore

    I’m one of Dr. Davis’ patients and I’m thrilled to see that he’s completed this book. I was one of the many people who testified to the benefits of eliminating wheat from their diet.

    I’m not at all surprised at the backlash in defense of the beloved wheat. It is so thoroughly entrenched in our culture that the truth about it will be hampered for quite some time. Hampered by those who innately fear change and from those who benefit financially directly and indirectly from the pro-wheat dogma.

    To those of you protesting the loudest that wheat is beneficial or benign, I’ll wager that most of you would be unwilling to spend 90 days totally wheat-free and be honest about how you feel. You’d rather spend countless hours over the same 90 days spewing pro-wheat venom and citing every source, study, and argument that you can find on the internet, all in a hopeless attempt to convince those who have already experienced the benefits.

    You’re like a drunken alcoholic who is preaching to the recovered that they’re not really feeling better because the booze is gone from their lives and that they should just start drinking again.

    Good luck with that.

    Reply
  3. timmah

    I gave in to peer pressure at a two-day conference last week and ate cinnamon rolls or breakfast pizza for breakfast, and then the pasta-rich lunches.

    I felt something in the aftermath of said conference: the apathetic haze that was a part of my character throughout my late teens and early 20s.

    I sat on the couch and didn’t care most of Sunday. When I did something (after being prodded to do it several times), I left out an important detail that resulted in intervention from others before harm came to myself or others.

    Without going into too much detail, I’m pretty sure my wife wants to beat me with a garden hose right about now. It was that bad.

    I’m pretty sure she’s not going to accept “wheat and excessive sugar” as a reason for my behavior.

    No ‘Twinkie Defense’ for you, I guess.

    Reply
  4. timmah

    I gave in to peer pressure at a two-day conference last week and ate cinnamon rolls or breakfast pizza for breakfast, and then the pasta-rich lunches.

    I felt something in the aftermath of said conference: the apathetic haze that was a part of my character throughout my late teens and early 20s.

    I sat on the couch and didn’t care most of Sunday. When I did something (after being prodded to do it several times), I left out an important detail that resulted in intervention from others before harm came to myself or others.

    Without going into too much detail, I’m pretty sure my wife wants to beat me with a garden hose right about now. It was that bad.

    I’m pretty sure she’s not going to accept “wheat and excessive sugar” as a reason for my behavior.

    No ‘Twinkie Defense’ for you, I guess.

    Reply
  5. WereBear

    It was thanks to reading Dr. Davis’ blog for a year that I gave up wheat entirely to see “what would happen.”

    This is AFTER I had eaten low carb for seven years; quite happily, too.

    I lost five additional pounds effortlessly. The arthritis pains in my hands subsided and as of last Christmas are going away. My mood, already rather bouyant (ask my friends) bounced up even more. And NOW I have serious stomach pains if I accidentally get some.

    I believe Dr. Davis.

    Reply
  6. WereBear

    It was thanks to reading Dr. Davis’ blog for a year that I gave up wheat entirely to see “what would happen.”

    This is AFTER I had eaten low carb for seven years; quite happily, too.

    I lost five additional pounds effortlessly. The arthritis pains in my hands subsided and as of last Christmas are going away. My mood, already rather bouyant (ask my friends) bounced up even more. And NOW I have serious stomach pains if I accidentally get some.

    I believe Dr. Davis.

    Reply
  7. mcmemom

    I have been reading this blog since watching Fat Head but have been “shy” about posting until reading the posts from “Wildflower”. I have been active, healthy and lean my entire life (I am 40 with 4 children). About a year ago, I took up running with the goal of completing a 10K. About a month into training, I developed a strange rash. Doctors kept telling me it was just “dermatitis” and prescribing ointment. It drove me crazy and itched so much I would scratch myself bloody. During one of my night classes (in nutrition) my professor talked about intolerances to wheat and grains and how sometimes people develop rashes. I spoke with him after class and he urged me to get tested or at the very least cut out grains. I was very doubtful because I have never “had an issue” or so I thought with grains. Sure enough, I tested positive for a gluten intolerance. I was shocked because I “felt good”. (Dr. Davis actually talks about this wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) in his book – I only seemed to have the rash part). I immediately cut out wheat and the rash DISAPPEARED completely. My husband and I were amazed. But the best part, I no longer have “PMS headaches”, “joints that ache when it’s cold because of past sports”, “bloating because of blah, blah, blah”. All the time that I spent “listening to my body” did not work because I believed I was normal and healthy – everyone gets headaches and some aches etc, etc. The crazy part is that now if I have any wheat at all I get sick within an hour. We have since taken our children off wheat and their allergies are mysteriously clearing up and my daughter’s “IBS/nervous stomach” disappeared. I am a believer and I honestly think my children will be so much healthier because of it. As a side note, other family members took wheat out of their and their children’s diet and had similar results. Good thing we didn’t “listen to our bodies” or our doctors!

    WildFlower will of course contend that you merely needed to switch to organic, unbleached wheat.

    Reply
  8. mcmemom

    I have been reading this blog since watching Fat Head but have been “shy” about posting until reading the posts from “Wildflower”. I have been active, healthy and lean my entire life (I am 40 with 4 children). About a year ago, I took up running with the goal of completing a 10K. About a month into training, I developed a strange rash. Doctors kept telling me it was just “dermatitis” and prescribing ointment. It drove me crazy and itched so much I would scratch myself bloody. During one of my night classes (in nutrition) my professor talked about intolerances to wheat and grains and how sometimes people develop rashes. I spoke with him after class and he urged me to get tested or at the very least cut out grains. I was very doubtful because I have never “had an issue” or so I thought with grains. Sure enough, I tested positive for a gluten intolerance. I was shocked because I “felt good”. (Dr. Davis actually talks about this wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) in his book – I only seemed to have the rash part). I immediately cut out wheat and the rash DISAPPEARED completely. My husband and I were amazed. But the best part, I no longer have “PMS headaches”, “joints that ache when it’s cold because of past sports”, “bloating because of blah, blah, blah”. All the time that I spent “listening to my body” did not work because I believed I was normal and healthy – everyone gets headaches and some aches etc, etc. The crazy part is that now if I have any wheat at all I get sick within an hour. We have since taken our children off wheat and their allergies are mysteriously clearing up and my daughter’s “IBS/nervous stomach” disappeared. I am a believer and I honestly think my children will be so much healthier because of it. As a side note, other family members took wheat out of their and their children’s diet and had similar results. Good thing we didn’t “listen to our bodies” or our doctors!

    WildFlower will of course contend that you merely needed to switch to organic, unbleached wheat.

    Reply
  9. Natalie

    I have not yet read the book, but I have a couple of questions. First of all, I wonder whether it is not just wheat, but all grains or possibly all carbs. After a diabetic coma last year, I decided to go reduced-carb, and gave up not only bread and pasta, but also rice, potatoes, corn and peas. I do get carbs from dairy products, because I feel there are essential nutrients in them, and eating Greek yogurt has helped a lot with intestinal problems. I lost 30 lb. and feel better these days.

    And I’ve definitely lost visceral fat, because although my weight went down, I gained subcutaneous fat, so the only source of the weight loss has to be visceral fat. However, the subQ fat I gained has concentrated around my belly, not hips, butt or thighs. So I question the title “wheat belly” because in my experience, giving up wheat has not changed my body shape.

    I wonder whether there is a genetic predisposition to where you deposit your fat, because all the women in my family, on both sides, dating back to the 1880’s before the introduction of modern wheat, have collected their fat (although none were obese) around their bellies. I have pictures to prove it.

    I have been followed by a cardiologist for 20 years now, because I had a coronary artery spasm in 1992, but the angiogram was perfectly normal. I had chest pains last April, so I had another angiogram, and again, I was free and clear. Plus I have diabetes, and a paternal history of early heart disease.

    Again, eliminating ALL high-carb foods has improved my blood lipids and blood sugars, so I’m not totally sold on the idea that it is only wheat.

    And I’d be happy to have your reactions to my comments! 🙂

    Where you store fat is definitely genetic. Dr. Davis urges his patients to reduce carbohydrates in general, but believes wheat is the worst of the grains for all the reasons he spells out in the book.

    Reply
  10. Natalie

    I have not yet read the book, but I have a couple of questions. First of all, I wonder whether it is not just wheat, but all grains or possibly all carbs. After a diabetic coma last year, I decided to go reduced-carb, and gave up not only bread and pasta, but also rice, potatoes, corn and peas. I do get carbs from dairy products, because I feel there are essential nutrients in them, and eating Greek yogurt has helped a lot with intestinal problems. I lost 30 lb. and feel better these days.

    And I’ve definitely lost visceral fat, because although my weight went down, I gained subcutaneous fat, so the only source of the weight loss has to be visceral fat. However, the subQ fat I gained has concentrated around my belly, not hips, butt or thighs. So I question the title “wheat belly” because in my experience, giving up wheat has not changed my body shape.

    I wonder whether there is a genetic predisposition to where you deposit your fat, because all the women in my family, on both sides, dating back to the 1880’s before the introduction of modern wheat, have collected their fat (although none were obese) around their bellies. I have pictures to prove it.

    I have been followed by a cardiologist for 20 years now, because I had a coronary artery spasm in 1992, but the angiogram was perfectly normal. I had chest pains last April, so I had another angiogram, and again, I was free and clear. Plus I have diabetes, and a paternal history of early heart disease.

    Again, eliminating ALL high-carb foods has improved my blood lipids and blood sugars, so I’m not totally sold on the idea that it is only wheat.

    And I’d be happy to have your reactions to my comments! 🙂

    Where you store fat is definitely genetic. Dr. Davis urges his patients to reduce carbohydrates in general, but believes wheat is the worst of the grains for all the reasons he spells out in the book.

    Reply
  11. Judy

    I ordered the wheat belly book in hopes of losing weight and controlling my insulin resistance but after reading it I am convinced that total wheat elimination could help my mother, who has crohn’s disease and my sister who has rheumatoid arthritis. No doubt about it, this book really opened my eyes and I no longer believe that wheat, or any grain for that matter should be part of a healthy diet.

    Losing weight is a small benefit compared to overcoming so many other wheat-related ailments.

    Reply
  12. Judy

    I ordered the wheat belly book in hopes of losing weight and controlling my insulin resistance but after reading it I am convinced that total wheat elimination could help my mother, who has crohn’s disease and my sister who has rheumatoid arthritis. No doubt about it, this book really opened my eyes and I no longer believe that wheat, or any grain for that matter should be part of a healthy diet.

    Losing weight is a small benefit compared to overcoming so many other wheat-related ailments.

    Reply
  13. Fred Hahn

    What did you expect Tom? And be careful – wheat advocates are sneaky. They might slip you a gluten-mickey!

    If they’re smart, they’ll plop it in a Guinness when I’m feeling indulgent.

    Reply
  14. Paul Verizzo

    Hey, are any of you “I eat lots of wheat and I’m thriving” folks, ahem, elderly? I ate SAD and was skinny in youth, appropriate in middle age. By my late 50’s I was FAT. But even worse, I can still remember the day in February 2009 I was almost crying to my sister about my body aches and pains. I was 62 and with my family genetics had that to look forward to for another 30-40 years?

    In June of 2009 I went PGP – Pretty Good Paleo. I lost 55 pounds by fall. But what happened even faster was the loss of my aches and pains within a week of going paleo! GONE! I later noticed that my toenail fungus stopped it’s steady march and was in retreat. Eventually I completely lost my visceral fat, the appropriately named wheat belly.

    I subscribe to what the father of toxicology said: “The poison is in the dose.” I still eat wheat, but minimally and rarely. What’s a Fourth of July hot dog without a bun?

    So, all you young sprats that think wheat isn’t hurting you, revisit this topic in your head in thirty or forty years, OK? And oh, I recently looked at some pictures of me in the pool and jacuzzi thirty years ago, when my weight was appropriate and was doing a lot of working out. But now, what do my eyes see? Subcutaneous body fat. A bit of an “Innie” navel. Why? Lots of SAD, lots of bread and grains.

    Never again.

    I have the same reaction when jocks in their 20s and 30s tell me how lean they are despite eating lots of carbohydrates. Talk to me in 25 years.

    Reply
  15. Paul Verizzo

    Would it be safe to say that if one “Has to” have some bread – rarely, of course – the specialty breads I’ve seen at Hole Foods might be a less problematic choice? I’m thinking spelt, I don’t recall what else I’ve seen.

    Those would be less damaging than the mutant wheat variety, according to Dr. Davis.

    Reply
  16. Fred Hahn

    What did you expect Tom? And be careful – wheat advocates are sneaky. They might slip you a gluten-mickey!

    If they’re smart, they’ll plop it in a Guinness when I’m feeling indulgent.

    Reply
  17. Marielize Goldie

    “The Guidelines call for the average healthy American to consume six one-ounce servings of grain (read grass seeds) foods daily,” … “Wheat (only
    ONE kind of grass seed) is the basis for a number of healthful whole and enriched grain foods including breads, cereal, pasta and wheat berries”

    The above statements and the fact that the whole big bottom part of the food pyramid is mainly grains (read grass seeds) and the fact that the whole world is swallowing it hook, line and sinker, is one of those things that are so weird it blows the mind!

    To see it for what it really is imagine we use another mono seed, to replace the grass seed strata in the food pyramid…

    Lets say we had a major agricultural success with, oh lets say, fennel seeds or tomato seeds or, coconut “seeds” or broccoli seeds, apple seeds, lettice seeds…

    Then convince the whole world that the ONE kind of seed from ONE plant species on its own is so important that it can not be replaced by the thousands of other whole foods available. And remember to get most of your kj from it!

    Sounds like a plot from a bad Sci Fi movie? – but what the hell, we’re living it without batting an eye.

    So we’re living in a bad movie.

    Reply
  18. Paul Verizzo

    Hey, are any of you “I eat lots of wheat and I’m thriving” folks, ahem, elderly? I ate SAD and was skinny in youth, appropriate in middle age. By my late 50’s I was FAT. But even worse, I can still remember the day in February 2009 I was almost crying to my sister about my body aches and pains. I was 62 and with my family genetics had that to look forward to for another 30-40 years?

    In June of 2009 I went PGP – Pretty Good Paleo. I lost 55 pounds by fall. But what happened even faster was the loss of my aches and pains within a week of going paleo! GONE! I later noticed that my toenail fungus stopped it’s steady march and was in retreat. Eventually I completely lost my visceral fat, the appropriately named wheat belly.

    I subscribe to what the father of toxicology said: “The poison is in the dose.” I still eat wheat, but minimally and rarely. What’s a Fourth of July hot dog without a bun?

    So, all you young sprats that think wheat isn’t hurting you, revisit this topic in your head in thirty or forty years, OK? And oh, I recently looked at some pictures of me in the pool and jacuzzi thirty years ago, when my weight was appropriate and was doing a lot of working out. But now, what do my eyes see? Subcutaneous body fat. A bit of an “Innie” navel. Why? Lots of SAD, lots of bread and grains.

    Never again.

    I have the same reaction when jocks in their 20s and 30s tell me how lean they are despite eating lots of carbohydrates. Talk to me in 25 years.

    Reply
  19. Paul Verizzo

    Would it be safe to say that if one “Has to” have some bread – rarely, of course – the specialty breads I’ve seen at Hole Foods might be a less problematic choice? I’m thinking spelt, I don’t recall what else I’ve seen.

    Those would be less damaging than the mutant wheat variety, according to Dr. Davis.

    Reply
  20. Marielize Goldie

    “The Guidelines call for the average healthy American to consume six one-ounce servings of grain (read grass seeds) foods daily,” … “Wheat (only
    ONE kind of grass seed) is the basis for a number of healthful whole and enriched grain foods including breads, cereal, pasta and wheat berries”

    The above statements and the fact that the whole big bottom part of the food pyramid is mainly grains (read grass seeds) and the fact that the whole world is swallowing it hook, line and sinker, is one of those things that are so weird it blows the mind!

    To see it for what it really is imagine we use another mono seed, to replace the grass seed strata in the food pyramid…

    Lets say we had a major agricultural success with, oh lets say, fennel seeds or tomato seeds or, coconut “seeds” or broccoli seeds, apple seeds, lettice seeds…

    Then convince the whole world that the ONE kind of seed from ONE plant species on its own is so important that it can not be replaced by the thousands of other whole foods available. And remember to get most of your kj from it!

    Sounds like a plot from a bad Sci Fi movie? – but what the hell, we’re living it without batting an eye.

    So we’re living in a bad movie.

    Reply
  21. Susan

    “…half of which should come from whole grains and the other half from enriched grains.”

    In other words, “grains aren’t for shit, so make sure you eat the ones with the industrially produced, synthetic-vitamins-powder added.”

    So sayeth the grain people.

    Reply
  22. Susan

    “…half of which should come from whole grains and the other half from enriched grains.”

    In other words, “grains aren’t for shit, so make sure you eat the ones with the industrially produced, synthetic-vitamins-powder added.”

    So sayeth the grain people.

    Reply
  23. kal

    I dont have time to read through all the comments… Was there a discussion in the book about sprouted grain bread? I eat bread that contains no flour, only sprouted grains (one of which is wheat). Better? No different?
    For anyone who cares, the biggest change for me has been entirely eliminating dairy from my diet. The improvement has been monumental. The scary thing is I thought I felt fine and didnt react to dairy at all before I decided to eliminate it for a “short time” just for experimentation. That was ages ago and I’m never going back.

    Better, but better doesn’t mean good. See part two of the interview, in which he discusses other grains, sprouting, etc.

    Reply
  24. kal

    I dont have time to read through all the comments… Was there a discussion in the book about sprouted grain bread? I eat bread that contains no flour, only sprouted grains (one of which is wheat). Better? No different?
    For anyone who cares, the biggest change for me has been entirely eliminating dairy from my diet. The improvement has been monumental. The scary thing is I thought I felt fine and didnt react to dairy at all before I decided to eliminate it for a “short time” just for experimentation. That was ages ago and I’m never going back.

    Better, but better doesn’t mean good. See part two of the interview, in which he discusses other grains, sprouting, etc.

    Reply
  25. ravi

    Hi – forgive this related but odd comment – out of curiosity i slid over to one of the links supplied by a naysayer above – to huntgatherlove and was rather appalled that melissa – a seemingly bright blogger in the paleo realm, would be dissing Wheat Belly –

    being in the group that needs not read Wheat Belly since i am already totally convinced of wheat’s evil and having been a reader of Dr Davis’s blog (ok, i will read it when i get my hands on it), i wrote her a response that perhaps was a bit to acerbic for her to approve. Now i know that Denise Minger would post my response were it her blog, but then again, i cannot imagine ever having to write such a comment to Denise – so through and intelligent are her posts. So for anyone who wandered over to huntgatherlove and in the event she does not approve my comment – i offer it here for my (and perhaps your readers) edification (or maybe my vilification!… 🙂 )

    (response to Agronomy Fail, Hunt Gather Love)

    melissa, to be what is blatantly condescending to a clearly sincere individual with real life experience (how’s your patient count these days melissa…? oops – forgot yer just a kid!) is pretty rude and self-revealing of your own arrogance (and ignorance…). Dismissing the whole of an experienced persons opinion (of course, NONE of what you expose is just “opinion”, is it?) when he is in essence supporting many of the basic premises that you too hold dear is pretty – well – narrow-minded? I personally am a eager meat eating lacto-paleo, so don’t go off about me being some vegan troll –

    … and BTW – i think that even vegetarians (not vegans) can hold to a paleo approach to nutrition and with adjustments, be healthy. Be kinda good to have some vegetarians supporting the avoidance of neolithic poisons, don’t ya think?

    slamming a book without having cracked the cover is just about the most insidious form of arrogant laziness – maybe you slide over to Denise’s blog and get a few pointers on how to disembowel someone with whom you disagree with some class, wit and substance–

    i wish Dr Davis a long stay on the NYT bestseller list–

    Reply
  26. ravi

    Hi – forgive this related but odd comment – out of curiosity i slid over to one of the links supplied by a naysayer above – to huntgatherlove and was rather appalled that melissa – a seemingly bright blogger in the paleo realm, would be dissing Wheat Belly –

    being in the group that needs not read Wheat Belly since i am already totally convinced of wheat’s evil and having been a reader of Dr Davis’s blog (ok, i will read it when i get my hands on it), i wrote her a response that perhaps was a bit to acerbic for her to approve. Now i know that Denise Minger would post my response were it her blog, but then again, i cannot imagine ever having to write such a comment to Denise – so through and intelligent are her posts. So for anyone who wandered over to huntgatherlove and in the event she does not approve my comment – i offer it here for my (and perhaps your readers) edification (or maybe my vilification!… 🙂 )

    (response to Agronomy Fail, Hunt Gather Love)

    melissa, to be what is blatantly condescending to a clearly sincere individual with real life experience (how’s your patient count these days melissa…? oops – forgot yer just a kid!) is pretty rude and self-revealing of your own arrogance (and ignorance…). Dismissing the whole of an experienced persons opinion (of course, NONE of what you expose is just “opinion”, is it?) when he is in essence supporting many of the basic premises that you too hold dear is pretty – well – narrow-minded? I personally am a eager meat eating lacto-paleo, so don’t go off about me being some vegan troll –

    … and BTW – i think that even vegetarians (not vegans) can hold to a paleo approach to nutrition and with adjustments, be healthy. Be kinda good to have some vegetarians supporting the avoidance of neolithic poisons, don’t ya think?

    slamming a book without having cracked the cover is just about the most insidious form of arrogant laziness – maybe you slide over to Denise’s blog and get a few pointers on how to disembowel someone with whom you disagree with some class, wit and substance–

    i wish Dr Davis a long stay on the NYT bestseller list–

    Reply
  27. Will

    “I don’t think they’re laughing. I think they’re desperately clutching at straws”

    Or grain stalks…

    Reply
  28. 358sportsman racechick

    I read all of the comments to date. Please read Going Against the Grain, Nourishing Traditions, and the Perricone Promise. These books dovetail nicely into Wheat Belly.

    I think it’s important to look at all the foods recommended and those on the “for limited consumption” list. Soy is so genetically modified and high in phytoestrogens, so why eat it? There is no corn on the planet that isn’t messed up by cross-pollination. Don’t overlook raw nuts (soak them first) and avocados as a basis for raw puddings & ice kream substitutes (stevia sweetened). Try making raw food style wraps with sprouted seeds and veggies (low glycemic). Don’t forget your dark leafy greens (read Victoria Boutenko and the nutritarian guy).

    Some suggestions: If you are eating unfermented and/or pasteurized dairy, you might be mistaking bloat for subcutaneous fat. When I give up dairy, I get sculpted arms. Oh yeah, if are caffeinated, you could be holding onto excess weight.

    I’ve cut way back on dairy, but I’ll give up my coffee when you pry it from my cold, dead, still-shaking hands.

    Reply
  29. 358sportsman racechick

    I read all of the comments to date. Please read Going Against the Grain, Nourishing Traditions, and the Perricone Promise. These books dovetail nicely into Wheat Belly.

    I think it’s important to look at all the foods recommended and those on the “for limited consumption” list. Soy is so genetically modified and high in phytoestrogens, so why eat it? There is no corn on the planet that isn’t messed up by cross-pollination. Don’t overlook raw nuts (soak them first) and avocados as a basis for raw puddings & ice kream substitutes (stevia sweetened). Try making raw food style wraps with sprouted seeds and veggies (low glycemic). Don’t forget your dark leafy greens (read Victoria Boutenko and the nutritarian guy).

    Some suggestions: If you are eating unfermented and/or pasteurized dairy, you might be mistaking bloat for subcutaneous fat. When I give up dairy, I get sculpted arms. Oh yeah, if are caffeinated, you could be holding onto excess weight.

    I’ve cut way back on dairy, but I’ll give up my coffee when you pry it from my cold, dead, still-shaking hands.

    Reply
  30. Jez

    I have known I was allergic to wheat for more than ten years but refused to do anything about it. The thought of giving p wheat was just too much to contemplate. But for the last 3 years my skin rashes have become more intolerable and slathering on steroid cream just wasn’t doing it any longer. My sister is a Celiac and so I knew there was some stuff going on. After reading Wheat Belly I decided to finally cut wheat out. I’ve been off it completely for 2 weeks and I have to say I already notice changes. My skin has almost cleared up completely after at least 5 years of an unsightly rash. My thinking seems clearer and I’ve already started to lose weight.
    While I find thinking about what to eat a constant challenge I have noticed that when I don’t eat the high glycemic foods I do not have cravings the way I used to and instead of eating lunch right at noon I find myself noticing it’s 1:30 before I think about eating. That in itself is a small miracle!
    The thing that really made me want to try this was that I started to think about what kind of inflammation was occurring inside my organs that I couldn’t see. I have always struggled with depression and was that because of wheat? The only thing to do was to go wheat-free and see the results myself. So far I’m very positive about this change and I think I may finally shed the 60 lbs of extra weight that I’ve carried with me for so many years. Wheat Belly is a very interesting book and so far I think it’s life-changing.

    I wish you well on the wheat-free diet. Trust me, you won’t miss the stuff after awhile.

    Reply
  31. Jez

    I have known I was allergic to wheat for more than ten years but refused to do anything about it. The thought of giving p wheat was just too much to contemplate. But for the last 3 years my skin rashes have become more intolerable and slathering on steroid cream just wasn’t doing it any longer. My sister is a Celiac and so I knew there was some stuff going on. After reading Wheat Belly I decided to finally cut wheat out. I’ve been off it completely for 2 weeks and I have to say I already notice changes. My skin has almost cleared up completely after at least 5 years of an unsightly rash. My thinking seems clearer and I’ve already started to lose weight.
    While I find thinking about what to eat a constant challenge I have noticed that when I don’t eat the high glycemic foods I do not have cravings the way I used to and instead of eating lunch right at noon I find myself noticing it’s 1:30 before I think about eating. That in itself is a small miracle!
    The thing that really made me want to try this was that I started to think about what kind of inflammation was occurring inside my organs that I couldn’t see. I have always struggled with depression and was that because of wheat? The only thing to do was to go wheat-free and see the results myself. So far I’m very positive about this change and I think I may finally shed the 60 lbs of extra weight that I’ve carried with me for so many years. Wheat Belly is a very interesting book and so far I think it’s life-changing.

    I wish you well on the wheat-free diet. Trust me, you won’t miss the stuff after awhile.

    Reply
  32. Ann Power

    Hi there! I have had psoriasis all of my life. After my divorce, it has become worse and I’ve developed large patches on my legs. Can anyone help with this? Do you think becoming wheat free can help? Oh, I also have chronic migraines. Any help would be most appreciated. Thanks!

    Definitely try a grain-free diet. I had psoriasis (not to the same extent as you) that went away when I gave up grains.

    Reply
  33. Ann Power

    Hi there! I have had psoriasis all of my life. After my divorce, it has become worse and I’ve developed large patches on my legs. Can anyone help with this? Do you think becoming wheat free can help? Oh, I also have chronic migraines. Any help would be most appreciated. Thanks!

    Definitely try a grain-free diet. I had psoriasis (not to the same extent as you) that went away when I gave up grains.

    Reply
  34. Pat Goldberg

    Forget the debates – all you have to do is try it for ONE week. Anyone should be able to give up wheat for 1 week and see what happens. I am extremely skeptical and didn’t really believe I could be allergic/intolerant of wheat but I have severe asthma and some arthritis developing so I thought it was worth a shot. After 3 days I thought I was breathing better. After 5 days I thought about my longtime favorite foods, pesto pasta and a nice whole grain toast, and realized with shock that they didn’t appeal to me at all. I lost all interest in wheat products. It has been 4weeks and I am absolutely not interested in eating wheat again. I have lost a few pounds (not my intention but making me happy), my breathing is better and my developing arthritis has actually decreased. I feel great! Try it for just one week. There is a good chance you will feel better. I will never eat wheat again!

    Good advice. If it doesn’t work, all you lost were a few servings of wheat.

    Reply
  35. Pat Goldberg

    Forget the debates – all you have to do is try it for ONE week. Anyone should be able to give up wheat for 1 week and see what happens. I am extremely skeptical and didn’t really believe I could be allergic/intolerant of wheat but I have severe asthma and some arthritis developing so I thought it was worth a shot. After 3 days I thought I was breathing better. After 5 days I thought about my longtime favorite foods, pesto pasta and a nice whole grain toast, and realized with shock that they didn’t appeal to me at all. I lost all interest in wheat products. It has been 4weeks and I am absolutely not interested in eating wheat again. I have lost a few pounds (not my intention but making me happy), my breathing is better and my developing arthritis has actually decreased. I feel great! Try it for just one week. There is a good chance you will feel better. I will never eat wheat again!

    Good advice. If it doesn’t work, all you lost were a few servings of wheat.

    Reply
  36. MD B

    One key point the author missed- the wheat today has been genetically modified, it is not the same wheat of out ancestors, also packaged foods made with wheat, have many chemical preservatives.

    Reply
  37. MD B

    One key point the author missed- the wheat today has been genetically modified, it is not the same wheat of out ancestors, also packaged foods made with wheat, have many chemical preservatives.

    Reply
  38. Ken

    I’ve been on Dr. Davis’ diet for some time now. Works great; I eat as much and as often as I want and my weight doesn’t change. I weigh the same today as I did when I graduated college; lost 15 lbs, mostly from my waist overall. I used to be a size 36 waist and now wear a size 33 (or 32 depending on cut); my shirt size is the same. My blood numbers look better (cut out wheat and grains and your LDL will go down and your HDL will go up) and I don’t get that mid-afternoon lethargy that I used to when eating grains.

    The idea that a calorie is a calorie is a calorie is flawed science. When you eat sugar (wheat looks like sugar to the body, even whole wheat) you get a spike of sugar in the blood and the liver, which evolved to be efficient at storing calories, converts what it can to fat.

    Before eliminating grains I did pretty well reducing grains and eating them last as the glycemic spike is reduced if you eat protein first. Using that logic: pizza is better for you than bread since the cheese and tomato sauce (an acid) both slow down digestion and prevent a very high glycemic spike.

    Reply
  39. Ken

    I’ve been on Dr. Davis’ diet for some time now. Works great; I eat as much and as often as I want and my weight doesn’t change. I weigh the same today as I did when I graduated college; lost 15 lbs, mostly from my waist overall. I used to be a size 36 waist and now wear a size 33 (or 32 depending on cut); my shirt size is the same. My blood numbers look better (cut out wheat and grains and your LDL will go down and your HDL will go up) and I don’t get that mid-afternoon lethargy that I used to when eating grains.

    The idea that a calorie is a calorie is a calorie is flawed science. When you eat sugar (wheat looks like sugar to the body, even whole wheat) you get a spike of sugar in the blood and the liver, which evolved to be efficient at storing calories, converts what it can to fat.

    Before eliminating grains I did pretty well reducing grains and eating them last as the glycemic spike is reduced if you eat protein first. Using that logic: pizza is better for you than bread since the cheese and tomato sauce (an acid) both slow down digestion and prevent a very high glycemic spike.

    Reply
  40. kate jenkins

    I too had my lifelong asthma disappear virtually overnight with the removal of gr!ins from my diet, but I also discovered pretty early on that i don’t cope too well with a meat-rich diet either. The one thing that bothers me about any new diet advocates is that they tend to make sweeping statements about its application to every person on the planet. As a mother of three, I made the same mistake with my children, believing that what worked for my body woul# also work for theirs. I have one daughter who is strict vegetarian, and another who suffers massive yes/th issues if she has almost any carbs at all. It wasnt until a dietician queried their blood types that I researched the blood type diet and was alerted to the concept of different types being able to better digest different kinds of foods. Turns out my ve%etarian is an a-type and my paleo kid is type o. Perhaps the people most likely to suffer from what and grain intolerance are all type o? That is the most common blood type. And the pe4son who said they benegited more from cutting out meat might possibly )e an a or ab? Just a thought.

    Reply
  41. kate jenkins

    I too had my lifelong asthma disappear virtually overnight with the removal of gr!ins from my diet, but I also discovered pretty early on that i don’t cope too well with a meat-rich diet either. The one thing that bothers me about any new diet advocates is that they tend to make sweeping statements about its application to every person on the planet. As a mother of three, I made the same mistake with my children, believing that what worked for my body woul# also work for theirs. I have one daughter who is strict vegetarian, and another who suffers massive yes/th issues if she has almost any carbs at all. It wasnt until a dietician queried their blood types that I researched the blood type diet and was alerted to the concept of different types being able to better digest different kinds of foods. Turns out my ve%etarian is an a-type and my paleo kid is type o. Perhaps the people most likely to suffer from what and grain intolerance are all type o? That is the most common blood type. And the pe4son who said they benegited more from cutting out meat might possibly )e an a or ab? Just a thought.

    Reply
  42. Dave

    Ah, me and my family are moving to a more rural area of the states. After moving in about 2 months, I’ve decided that’s the point I’m going to cut out all refined carbs, added sugars, and wheat. (Mostly because we’re on a very tight budget and I’m not currently in charge of buying food for everyone) Any carbs I eat will be from fruits or vegetables. I’m looking forward to the experience and expect good things.

    Reply
  43. Dave

    Ah, me and my family are moving to a more rural area of the states. After moving in about 2 months, I’ve decided that’s the point I’m going to cut out all refined carbs, added sugars, and wheat. (Mostly because we’re on a very tight budget and I’m not currently in charge of buying food for everyone) Any carbs I eat will be from fruits or vegetables. I’m looking forward to the experience and expect good things.

    Reply
  44. Vin

    Asian, latino, polynesian and black populations are especially prone to diabetes and heart disease from eating wheat because it is not a traditional food our genetic structure and our ability to metabolise carbs does not respond well to the sugar conversion making us more vulnerable to chronic disease go back to eating traditional fare or go wheat belly …

    Reply
  45. Vin

    Asian, latino, polynesian and black populations are especially prone to diabetes and heart disease from eating wheat because it is not a traditional food our genetic structure and our ability to metabolise carbs does not respond well to the sugar conversion making us more vulnerable to chronic disease go back to eating traditional fare or go wheat belly …

    Reply
  46. Yvonne

    loooooooooooool the lies they tell haha. Eliminating wheat was one of the best things I ever did. You wrote this well.

    Yee-up, doesn’t matter they say; when people experience the results of giving up wheat, that says it all.

    Reply
  47. Yvonne

    loooooooooooool the lies they tell haha. Eliminating wheat was one of the best things I ever did. You wrote this well.

    Yee-up, doesn’t matter they say; when people experience the results of giving up wheat, that says it all.

    Reply
  48. Ray Merkel

    After only three weeks without wheat I had the lowest blood sugar levels in the last twenty years, including levels well within the normal (non-diabetic) range two hours after eating. The American food industry is only interested in maximizing profits; this is why they have small armies of lawyers defending their cattle feed lots, which cause gross amounts of environmental damage; their practice of submerging ground beef in ammonia (to kill the bacterial blooms created by their feed lots); and the clouds of poisons they spray on our field crops and orchards, which are killing off the bees that are essential for pollinating many of these crops. Despite their propaganda, they are all about Frankenfood genetics and voodoo chemistry.

    Reply
  49. Ray Merkel

    After only three weeks without wheat I had the lowest blood sugar levels in the last twenty years, including levels well within the normal (non-diabetic) range two hours after eating. The American food industry is only interested in maximizing profits; this is why they have small armies of lawyers defending their cattle feed lots, which cause gross amounts of environmental damage; their practice of submerging ground beef in ammonia (to kill the bacterial blooms created by their feed lots); and the clouds of poisons they spray on our field crops and orchards, which are killing off the bees that are essential for pollinating many of these crops. Despite their propaganda, they are all about Frankenfood genetics and voodoo chemistry.

    Reply

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