The Grain Producers Respond to ‘Wheat Belly’

Not surprisingly, the U.S. grain industry isn’t happy with Dr. William Davis and his just-released book Wheat Belly. The Grain Foods Foundation responded to the book with a press release and a blog post explaining why we all need grains to be healthy. Here are some quotes from their blog post.

Don’t be fooled by catchy terms like “wheat belly” and “bagel butt”….a fad diet is still a fad diet, no matter how you dress it up.

That’s why I’m no longer on a low-fat, grain-based diet. What a stupid fad that was.  Granted, I’d love to think avoiding the grains that make us fat and sick is the hottest new fad, but I’m pretty sure getting a tattoo on your (bagel) butt is still comfortably in the lead.

That’s exactly the story behind the new book Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health that was released today.

Actually, the story behind Wheat Belly is that wheat (especially today’s genetically modified wheat) pretty much sucks from a health standpoint.

As the old saying goes, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

What exactly is “too good to be true” about telling people they’ll have to give up a food that makes up a major portion of their diets – a food many of them love? Dr. Davis has had people leave his office in tears after telling them they couldn’t handle wheat and needed to stop eating it. I doubt many of them were thinking, “Well, this is just too good to be true!”

Cutting out one specific food is not only unrealistic, it’s dangerous.

Really? So if I cut refined sugar from my diet, that would be dangerous? I’m a dead man walking.

Omitting wheat entirely removes the essential (and disease-fighting!) nutrients it provides including fiber, antioxidants, iron and B vitamins.

Ahhh, that would explain why humans became extinct during the hundreds of thousands of years we didn’t consume wheat. Thank goodness those friendly aliens came to earth, planted wheat fields, then resurrected human life from some DNA samples they’d kept frozen.

Besides this, the advice dished out by Dr. Davis is completely counter to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the gold standard of scientifically-sound nutrition advice.

Ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!!!!

Last time I checked, the gold standard in research consisted of randomized clinical studies in which the data actually supports the investigators’ conclusions. But if you folks want to re-define “gold standard” to consist of observational studies that often contradict the very advice they’re cited to support, be my guest … although I’d consider that more of a tin standard.

The Guidelines call for the average healthy American to consume six one-ounce servings of grain foods daily, half of which should come from whole grains and the other half from enriched grains.

So the government agency whose mission is to sell grains is telling us to eat grains. Well, that’s all the proof I need.

Wheat is the basis for a number of healthful whole and enriched grain foods including breads, cereal, pasta and wheat berries that provide valuable nutrients to the American diet and have been shown to help with weight maintenance.

Can’t argue with that one. Wheat will definitely help you maintain your weight … at, say, 40 pounds above where you’d like to be.

So, let common sense prevail. When it comes to nutrition advice, look to the real experts and remember that weight control is all about one key equation: calories in must equal calories out.

Use common sense? Look to the real experts? I thought you said you wanted us to listen to the USDA Dietary Guidelines Committee! Make up your minds already.

The good news is that there were dozens of comments on the post, nearly all of them negative, with many citing examples of how eliminating wheat caused health problems to vanish. Others pointed out that the Grain Foods Foundation didn’t actually dispute any of the science in Wheat Belly, which is true.

Dr. Davis wrote his own reply a few days later, which you can read here. As in the book, he made his arguments with logic and science. That prompted another reply by the Grain Foods Foundation:

Over the weekend we received a number of comments in response to our previous post, Our Perspective on “Wheat Belly” and we’d like to take a moment to address them.

Then why didn’t you? The rest of your post doesn’t answer any of the many criticisms leveled by people who left comments.

First, your comments weren’t being ignored. Comments on this blog are reviewed before they appear to prevent the posting of spam or profanity. There was no attempt to censor this feedback – our team was simply enjoying the long holiday weekend.

I’ll bet it was kind of depressing to enjoy a long weekend, then go to work on Tuesday and read dozens of comments left by people who basically kicked your bagel butts.

Second, there were comments questioning GFF’s funding sources. The Foundation is funded through voluntary donations from private grain-based companies and industry associations. However, any nutrition information we share is rooted in sound science and reviewed by independent nutrition experts from our Scientific Advisory Board.

Yes, I’m sure if your advisory board discovered, say, that celiac disease is five times more prevalent now than 50 years ago, they’d inform you immediately so you could bang out a press release announcing that you’ll stop producing mutant wheat.

Finally, some of you question the merit of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which are the gold standard of nutrition guidance in America.

The only reason we question those guidelines is that there’s nothing scientific about them, as even one of the committee members later admitted.

They are the most comprehensive review of the existing literature and are updated every five years to reflect new research. Every recommendation we share is based on these Guidelines. It is the most credible information available and we will continue to rely on them for our recommendations.

Let’s see … a government agency whose mission is to sell grains releases new guidelines every five years telling us to eat lots of grains … boy, I’m just stunned that the Grain Foods Foundation would continue to rely on the USDA for dietary advice.

So here’s how I’ve got it on my scorecard: Dr. Davis landed a flurry of punches in the form of hundreds of studies and dozens of case histories from his own medical practice. The Grain Food Foundation’s only counter-punch was to remind us that the USDA recommends eating grains.

If this were a fight, the ref would’ve stopped it halfway through the first round.

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210 thoughts on “The Grain Producers Respond to ‘Wheat Belly’

  1. Eric

    You should get together with Dr. Davis, start a Kickstarter project, and make the Wheat Belly movie to refute the “Go With The Grain” people.

    I don’t know about a movie, but when I get around to producing the DVD companion for our planned book, I will definitely ask for an on-camera interview. He’s only 90 minutes north of Chicago, where we go to visit the wife’s family.

    Reply
  2. Emily Deans

    I’m a doctor, and one of my patients (a fitness professional) who came in the other day said: “You are so tiny! What are you doing?”

    Me: “I don’t eat grains.”

    Her (laughing, as a fitness professional I’m sure she knows what is what!): “Well that explains it!”

    …and that explains it!

    And then she went out for a nice bowl of pasta.

    Reply
  3. Auntie M

    They’re running scared now! I bet the comments on that response will be even more interesting. 🙂

    I’m going to get a copy of Wheat Belly for my Kindle, then buy a couple to give as Christmas presents to family members. It probably won’t do any good, but at least I’m trying.

    Can’t hurt to try. You may save someone from a future health problem.

    Reply
  4. Be

    Well said Mr. Naughton. This whole thing has had my dander up all weekend. You say that “dozens” of us have lambasted them, but I count at least half a gross! You covered the points better than I could ever, but the GFF claim that really irked me was their claim that “the author relies on anecdotal observations rather than scientific studies.”

    First of all my personal experience is what counts for me, and I am sure that Dr. Davis’ patients would make the same claim. But to suggest that his argument is based solely on anecdotal evidence or that he claims that “only wheat” is the cause of diabetes is only evidence that the writer has not read the book. He cites numerous sources and is upfront when he is speculating on new ideas and theories (such as that it is cross breeding in the last 50 years that is at the root of the growth in celiacs disease).

    I am not convinced that wheat is alone the cause of our health epidemic (as opposed to being all refined starches) but it certainly is a significant source. However, Dr. Davis understands that:

    “Sure, sugary soft drinks and sedentary lifestyles add to the problem. But for the great majority of health-conscious people who don’t indulge in these obvious weight-gaining behaviors, the principal trigger for increasing weight is wheat.”

    Great book, easy read. Maybe a bit “cheeky” at times, but I have a much greater appreciation for making sure I am diligent about keeping gluten out of my diet even though I have basically done that and lost 40 pounds in the first 6 months – that have stayed off for at least 6 months since then.

    I like the cheeky comments he tosses in. Take some good information, fold it into clear sentences, add some humor for spice … that’s my favorite recipe.

    Reply
  5. Dr. William Davis

    Boy, Tom, if we were to engage the Grain Foods Foundation in a face-to-face debate, they’d be sobbing and begging for mercy within minutes!

    If we make a Wheat Belly movie, do you think Russell Crowe would play me?

    It would have to be Russell Crowe. The resemblance is striking. Congratulations on the response to the book … well-deserved.

    Reply
  6. Gerry Born

    I’m going to burn in nutritional Hell! I gave up grains last January and promptly lost 35 lbs. without ever counting calories. Boy, I sure don’t miss those grains! Great blog!

    Reply
  7. Tonja

    I am already sold on grains not being good for us at all… but I cannot wait to read Wheat Belly anyway! I just wish a movie WAS made about this because getting someone to read a book is difficult when they aren’t the type who wants to even explore new options… somehow we’ve got to get it out there.. SOMEHOW!

    Maybe Dr. Davis will produce a documentary someday.

    Reply
  8. Chris

    I’ve never understood people’s attachments to food stuffs. Seriously? Crying because someone told you not to eat something? Are we 3 and having your mom tell you not to take a cookie from the cookie jar?

    If someone is that attached to a food group they need to reexamine their life and psychological welfare. Or let Darwin’s course take over.

    As Dr. Davis points out in the book, wheat has addictive properties.

    Reply
  9. Christopher

    I love how their response didn’t even answer anything. I replied to their responce under the name Questions Everything. There responce post was utterly laughable. And by the way, I told the school health teacher about Fat Head, and I think she’s considering finding it to show along with Supersize Me. Let’s hope her students have the common sense to know which has the better information.

    Teachers who have shown both films tell me the combination sparks some lively debates.

    Reply
  10. Katie in FL

    Why would they refer to anything as the gold standard? The gov’t hasn’t used that for years- great track record to hold up!

    We have fiat money, and the USDA uses fiat science.

    Reply
  11. Jan

    “Omitting wheat entirely removes the essential (and disease-fighting!) nutrients it provides including fiber, antioxidants, iron and B vitamins.”

    Oh please. You could cover that with a plate of liver and onions.

    And I love thIs: “Cutting out one specific food is not only unrealistic, it’s dangerous.”

    Really? Tell that to Esselstyn, Ornish, and their legions of vegan fans. No one dares to suggest they’re being unrealistic or flirting with danger. Even if they are.

    And besides, that statement is just ridiculous on its face. I cut out rhubarb years ago. Amazingly, I’m still here.

    It was the second-most laughable statement in their reply. The most laughable was referring to the USDA’s guidelines as the gold standard for nutrition advice.

    Reply
  12. Lori

    My mom and I had a lesson today in wheat’s ability to jack up blood glucose. My mother had a piece of toast for breakfast, and I nagged her to check her BG one hour later. It was–wait for it–245. Yes, two hundred forty-five, from a fasting level of 101. At least now she knows what’s probably keeping her from losing weight and healing a chronic wound.

    Last year, I figured out that just a couple of slices of bread or one pita every day had caused me to put on 20 pounds. If I ate six servings of wheat a day, I’d be headed for 300 pounds.

    Wow, her reaction to wheat is even worse than mine. Glad you talked her into testing.

    Reply
  13. cancerclasses

    Yeah, right. Low carb and wheat free diets are a fad just like cancer, diabetes, celiac and other grain instigated diseases are a fad among the high wheat and carb eating group. With those people, cancer, diabetes and obesity is very popular!

    Was dismayed to see this article today: “Patients left the study because they were unwilling to give up #soft #drinks,Patients left the study because they were unwilling to give up #soft #drinks, chocolate & #sugars that feed #cancer. goo.gl/iKuXg chocolate & #sugars that feed #cancers. goo.gl/iKuXg .” Those sugars include ALL carbohydrates, as ALL carbs reduce to glucose, even the much lauded “complex” wheat carbs. Very sad that so many have fallen for the PR hype and marketing.

    Dr. Davis’s book is already elevating him to the level of a nutritional rock star Demi-God, and I am proud of the effort and integrity it takes to author what will prove to be the seminal treatise on wheat.

    I hope he becomes more popular than Elvis.

    Reply
  14. Linda Wallin

    Well my husband (who is a farmer of grains) and I were talking about this VERY thing about a year ago (and kept coming back to the topic) about the grains in corn and how it CANT be good for eating. You have all kinds of different corn seed that either is double stacked and so forth like you said. Well I did try to go all wheat and not only did I pack the pounds but packed on MASS Uggggggg! I could tell that after I ate that I would be irritated and snappy.
    Now I feel like a new lighter woman! wohoooooooo Just makes me sick that they hide wheat in soup, sauces, etc just so we would buy more of it! Reading this really burns my butt! lol

    That’s why it’s best to prepare your own meals from whole foods.

    Reply
  15. Melinda P

    Bought a copy of Wheat Belly for my Kindle and am still reading through it. So far, a really good read. Wow, those Grain Foods Foundation people must be really freaked out, judging by their responses. And I think Dr. Davis’ responses back are GREAT. It’s about time someone hit them in their central nerve…

    I hope they’re freaked out.

    Reply
  16. Richard

    Yeah, I used to buy into that bread lobby garbage, too. With much shame, I admit that at one point I used to be a grain eater maintaining my weight…

    … Which was about 70lbs heavier than it is now after I eliminated them from my diet.

    But you cut one specific food from your diet! Don’t you know that’s dangerous?

    Reply
  17. Eric

    You should get together with Dr. Davis, start a Kickstarter project, and make the Wheat Belly movie to refute the “Go With The Grain” people.

    I don’t know about a movie, but when I get around to producing the DVD companion for our planned book, I will definitely ask for an on-camera interview. He’s only 90 minutes north of Chicago, where we go to visit the wife’s family.

    Reply
  18. Emily Deans

    I’m a doctor, and one of my patients (a fitness professional) who came in the other day said: “You are so tiny! What are you doing?”

    Me: “I don’t eat grains.”

    Her (laughing, as a fitness professional I’m sure she knows what is what!): “Well that explains it!”

    …and that explains it!

    And then she went out for a nice bowl of pasta.

    Reply
  19. Stang

    It’s so easy to test a grain-free diet out in a scientific manner. Try it on yourself, see if it works, and be honest with the results. I’ve given up on people who argue with logic. Haters gonna hate.

    I’ve been low-carbing for months thanks to you and I’ve never been in better shape and health. I’m without health insurance. I feel safe knowing I am preventing avoidable chronic diseases.

    Public library is my budget for picking up Wheat Belly to read. Saw this book on a shelf, thought you might chime in, checked in, verified, satisfied.

    As always, track your own results and adjust accordingly.

    Reply
  20. Auntie M

    They’re running scared now! I bet the comments on that response will be even more interesting. 🙂

    I’m going to get a copy of Wheat Belly for my Kindle, then buy a couple to give as Christmas presents to family members. It probably won’t do any good, but at least I’m trying.

    Can’t hurt to try. You may save someone from a future health problem.

    Reply
  21. Be

    Well said Mr. Naughton. This whole thing has had my dander up all weekend. You say that “dozens” of us have lambasted them, but I count at least half a gross! You covered the points better than I could ever, but the GFF claim that really irked me was their claim that “the author relies on anecdotal observations rather than scientific studies.”

    First of all my personal experience is what counts for me, and I am sure that Dr. Davis’ patients would make the same claim. But to suggest that his argument is based solely on anecdotal evidence or that he claims that “only wheat” is the cause of diabetes is only evidence that the writer has not read the book. He cites numerous sources and is upfront when he is speculating on new ideas and theories (such as that it is cross breeding in the last 50 years that is at the root of the growth in celiacs disease).

    I am not convinced that wheat is alone the cause of our health epidemic (as opposed to being all refined starches) but it certainly is a significant source. However, Dr. Davis understands that:

    “Sure, sugary soft drinks and sedentary lifestyles add to the problem. But for the great majority of health-conscious people who don’t indulge in these obvious weight-gaining behaviors, the principal trigger for increasing weight is wheat.”

    Great book, easy read. Maybe a bit “cheeky” at times, but I have a much greater appreciation for making sure I am diligent about keeping gluten out of my diet even though I have basically done that and lost 40 pounds in the first 6 months – that have stayed off for at least 6 months since then.

    I like the cheeky comments he tosses in. Take some good information, fold it into clear sentences, add some humor for spice … that’s my favorite recipe.

    Reply
  22. Mike

    Please tell me, you posted something similar to this post,on that blog.

    I rarely comment on other blogs. This is my forum.

    Reply
  23. Roby

    Eating low-carb I found it quite easy to remove wheat ( I just had to take out some condiments) “Too good to be true” yep! for me!

    After two days I am already feeling the difference, which makes me wonder how intolerant I am to wheat. The only question I have now is; should we avoid contaminants like celiacs do? making sure knives aren’t used with our food and such? I don’t know how much amount of gluten something has to have to make and impact.

    I can’t wait to read the book!

    If you don’t have celiac, I don’t believe it’s necessary to go to extremes to avoid every little trace of gluten. If you base your diet on whole foods and skip the grains, you’re not likely to consume more than trace of the stuff.

    Reply
  24. Dr. William Davis

    Boy, Tom, if we were to engage the Grain Foods Foundation in a face-to-face debate, they’d be sobbing and begging for mercy within minutes!

    If we make a Wheat Belly movie, do you think Russell Crowe would play me?

    It would have to be Russell Crowe. The resemblance is striking. Congratulations on the response to the book … well-deserved.

    Reply
  25. Gerry Born

    I’m going to burn in nutritional Hell! I gave up grains last January and promptly lost 35 lbs. without ever counting calories. Boy, I sure don’t miss those grains! Great blog!

    Reply
  26. Tonja

    I am already sold on grains not being good for us at all… but I cannot wait to read Wheat Belly anyway! I just wish a movie WAS made about this because getting someone to read a book is difficult when they aren’t the type who wants to even explore new options… somehow we’ve got to get it out there.. SOMEHOW!

    Maybe Dr. Davis will produce a documentary someday.

    Reply
  27. Chris

    I’ve never understood people’s attachments to food stuffs. Seriously? Crying because someone told you not to eat something? Are we 3 and having your mom tell you not to take a cookie from the cookie jar?

    If someone is that attached to a food group they need to reexamine their life and psychological welfare. Or let Darwin’s course take over.

    As Dr. Davis points out in the book, wheat has addictive properties.

    Reply
  28. gallier2

    Cutting out one specific food is not only unrealistic, it’s dangerous.

    Don’t they realize how idiotic such a statement is? I cut out lutefisk* from my diet therefore I live a dangerous life. What idiots.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutefisk

    I cut lutefisk from my diet before I even tried it.

    Reply
  29. Christopher

    I love how their response didn’t even answer anything. I replied to their responce under the name Questions Everything. There responce post was utterly laughable. And by the way, I told the school health teacher about Fat Head, and I think she’s considering finding it to show along with Supersize Me. Let’s hope her students have the common sense to know which has the better information.

    Teachers who have shown both films tell me the combination sparks some lively debates.

    Reply
  30. Katie in FL

    Why would they refer to anything as the gold standard? The gov’t hasn’t used that for years- great track record to hold up!

    We have fiat money, and the USDA uses fiat science.

    Reply
  31. Jan

    “Omitting wheat entirely removes the essential (and disease-fighting!) nutrients it provides including fiber, antioxidants, iron and B vitamins.”

    Oh please. You could cover that with a plate of liver and onions.

    And I love thIs: “Cutting out one specific food is not only unrealistic, it’s dangerous.”

    Really? Tell that to Esselstyn, Ornish, and their legions of vegan fans. No one dares to suggest they’re being unrealistic or flirting with danger. Even if they are.

    And besides, that statement is just ridiculous on its face. I cut out rhubarb years ago. Amazingly, I’m still here.

    It was the second-most laughable statement in their reply. The most laughable was referring to the USDA’s guidelines as the gold standard for nutrition advice.

    Reply
  32. Patricia

    Yea! Wheat Belly is #5 on the NYT Bestsellers list for advice books. Quite an accomplishment in one week since release. I got my copy last week from Amazon, read it and went to the bookstore and bought 2 more. One I gave to my ND, who’s still recommending a veggie based diet, and the other is circulating among my favorite (fat) neighbors.

    Yeh, my reaction to “Besides this, the advice dished out by Dr. Davis is completely counter to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the gold standard of scientifically-sound nutrition advice” was like yours. Gold Standard my #&%!

    I would definitely get a copy of your book/DVD. I’m sure you’ll let us know when it’s released. Hurry!

    It’ll be awhile. Right now it’s all about moving to the mini-farm.

    Reply
  33. Lori

    My mom and I had a lesson today in wheat’s ability to jack up blood glucose. My mother had a piece of toast for breakfast, and I nagged her to check her BG one hour later. It was–wait for it–245. Yes, two hundred forty-five, from a fasting level of 101. At least now she knows what’s probably keeping her from losing weight and healing a chronic wound.

    Last year, I figured out that just a couple of slices of bread or one pita every day had caused me to put on 20 pounds. If I ate six servings of wheat a day, I’d be headed for 300 pounds.

    Wow, her reaction to wheat is even worse than mine. Glad you talked her into testing.

    Reply
  34. cancerclasses

    Yeah, right. Low carb and wheat free diets are a fad just like cancer, diabetes, celiac and other grain instigated diseases are a fad among the high wheat and carb eating group. With those people, cancer, diabetes and obesity is very popular!

    Was dismayed to see this article today: “Patients left the study because they were unwilling to give up #soft #drinks,Patients left the study because they were unwilling to give up #soft #drinks, chocolate & #sugars that feed #cancer. goo.gl/iKuXg chocolate & #sugars that feed #cancers. goo.gl/iKuXg .” Those sugars include ALL carbohydrates, as ALL carbs reduce to glucose, even the much lauded “complex” wheat carbs. Very sad that so many have fallen for the PR hype and marketing.

    Dr. Davis’s book is already elevating him to the level of a nutritional rock star Demi-God, and I am proud of the effort and integrity it takes to author what will prove to be the seminal treatise on wheat.

    I hope he becomes more popular than Elvis.

    Reply
  35. Linda Wallin

    Well my husband (who is a farmer of grains) and I were talking about this VERY thing about a year ago (and kept coming back to the topic) about the grains in corn and how it CANT be good for eating. You have all kinds of different corn seed that either is double stacked and so forth like you said. Well I did try to go all wheat and not only did I pack the pounds but packed on MASS Uggggggg! I could tell that after I ate that I would be irritated and snappy.
    Now I feel like a new lighter woman! wohoooooooo Just makes me sick that they hide wheat in soup, sauces, etc just so we would buy more of it! Reading this really burns my butt! lol

    That’s why it’s best to prepare your own meals from whole foods.

    Reply
  36. Melinda P

    Bought a copy of Wheat Belly for my Kindle and am still reading through it. So far, a really good read. Wow, those Grain Foods Foundation people must be really freaked out, judging by their responses. And I think Dr. Davis’ responses back are GREAT. It’s about time someone hit them in their central nerve…

    I hope they’re freaked out.

    Reply
  37. Richard

    Yeah, I used to buy into that bread lobby garbage, too. With much shame, I admit that at one point I used to be a grain eater maintaining my weight…

    … Which was about 70lbs heavier than it is now after I eliminated them from my diet.

    But you cut one specific food from your diet! Don’t you know that’s dangerous?

    Reply
  38. Stang

    It’s so easy to test a grain-free diet out in a scientific manner. Try it on yourself, see if it works, and be honest with the results. I’ve given up on people who argue with logic. Haters gonna hate.

    I’ve been low-carbing for months thanks to you and I’ve never been in better shape and health. I’m without health insurance. I feel safe knowing I am preventing avoidable chronic diseases.

    Public library is my budget for picking up Wheat Belly to read. Saw this book on a shelf, thought you might chime in, checked in, verified, satisfied.

    As always, track your own results and adjust accordingly.

    Reply
  39. Roby

    Eating low-carb I found it quite easy to remove wheat ( I just had to take out some condiments) “Too good to be true” yep! for me!

    After two days I am already feeling the difference, which makes me wonder how intolerant I am to wheat. The only question I have now is; should we avoid contaminants like celiacs do? making sure knives aren’t used with our food and such? I don’t know how much amount of gluten something has to have to make and impact.

    I can’t wait to read the book!

    If you don’t have celiac, I don’t believe it’s necessary to go to extremes to avoid every little trace of gluten. If you base your diet on whole foods and skip the grains, you’re not likely to consume more than trace of the stuff.

    Reply
  40. Alexandra

    My copy of Wheat Belly arrived yesterday and is next on the reading list.

    Related story…a very happy turn of events.

    Back in June of this year, a musician friend of mine came to my area for a concert. I hadn’t seen him in several years and was distressed to see him using a cane (he is only about 57 years old.) and clearly appeared to be in pain. This sweet guy came up to me and said I looked healthy and full of life (what a lovely compliment!) He told me that he had been suffering from severe joint pain throughout his body and was now living on pain medication and was having difficulty performing. He asked me what I was doing that made me healthy (I am 120 lbs lighter since he saw me last.) Rather than tell all on a busy concert night, I told him I would send him an e-mail with links, etc. the next day. The e-mail included Fat Head, of course! as well as numerous blogs and web sites that I thought would be of help to him. Long story short, I saw my friend again this past weekend… no cane and walking comfortably. He told me that, so far, all he had done was stop eating cereal and bread and within three months was able to stop all his pain medications and can again walk without pain, or a cane! To have played a role in helping this wonderful person feel well again made my heart swell!

    That is outstanding! It’s just too bad he didn’t get the same advice from a doctor years ago.

    Reply
  41. Patricia

    Yea! Wheat Belly is #5 on the NYT Bestsellers list for advice books. Quite an accomplishment in one week since release. I got my copy last week from Amazon, read it and went to the bookstore and bought 2 more. One I gave to my ND, who’s still recommending a veggie based diet, and the other is circulating among my favorite (fat) neighbors.

    Yeh, my reaction to “Besides this, the advice dished out by Dr. Davis is completely counter to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the gold standard of scientifically-sound nutrition advice” was like yours. Gold Standard my #&%!

    I would definitely get a copy of your book/DVD. I’m sure you’ll let us know when it’s released. Hurry!

    It’ll be awhile. Right now it’s all about moving to the mini-farm.

    Reply
  42. deMuralist

    I seem to remember that the last pyramid (or maybe the one before) had us needing to eat 11 servings of grain. So even the USDA is moving in the right direction.

    Dr. Davis’s science versus big wheat money-for the health of the American people, I sure hope science wins!

    The original food pyramid called for six to eleven servings of grains per day. Where they came up with eleven (why not ten, or twelve?) is anyone’s guess.

    Reply
  43. marilynb

    I don’t think the GFF bloggers are knowledgeable enough to be able to actually cite studies to prove their points or to respond intelligently to the questions raised by commenters. They are just trained to repeat the party line.

    Even if they had the expertise, they just don’t have the ammunition to refute the science.

    Reply
  44. Beowulf

    You know, it’s amazing that people survived at all in southern China where rice is the staple, and it’s a good thing that the settlers made it to America when they did, because the First Nation people were literally going extinct without a steady diet of wheat. That’s why the Lakota were so sickly and weak…oh wait, that was the settlers.

    I believe the rallying cry among the Lakota at Little Big Horn was something like “Take your wheat and stick it, Yellow Hair!”

    Reply
  45. LCNana

    Thanks for this Tom.

    Funny how these things go.

    First when one’s position is questioned one becomes instantly defensive – that’s only human I guess.

    Second, when once the defenses are up, one completely ignores any facts that show even the slightest possibility one’s position may be incorrect.

    Third, instead of explaining, expanding, augmenting your facts or showing with proper science that the opposition’s facts are false, one simply repeats the original statement. Yup, works every time. Does nobody study logic anymore? I’m right because I’m right just doesn’t cut it.

    Tom, I must thank you also for helping me see how poor most of the thinking “on the other side” really is – good people with good hearts, we must suppose – but as for thinkers? Sorry.

    All they can do is make a weak appeal to authority. They can’t dispute the science.

    Reply
  46. Alexandra

    My copy of Wheat Belly arrived yesterday and is next on the reading list.

    Related story…a very happy turn of events.

    Back in June of this year, a musician friend of mine came to my area for a concert. I hadn’t seen him in several years and was distressed to see him using a cane (he is only about 57 years old.) and clearly appeared to be in pain. This sweet guy came up to me and said I looked healthy and full of life (what a lovely compliment!) He told me that he had been suffering from severe joint pain throughout his body and was now living on pain medication and was having difficulty performing. He asked me what I was doing that made me healthy (I am 120 lbs lighter since he saw me last.) Rather than tell all on a busy concert night, I told him I would send him an e-mail with links, etc. the next day. The e-mail included Fat Head, of course! as well as numerous blogs and web sites that I thought would be of help to him. Long story short, I saw my friend again this past weekend… no cane and walking comfortably. He told me that, so far, all he had done was stop eating cereal and bread and within three months was able to stop all his pain medications and can again walk without pain, or a cane! To have played a role in helping this wonderful person feel well again made my heart swell!

    That is outstanding! It’s just too bad he didn’t get the same advice from a doctor years ago.

    Reply
  47. Bill Davis

    I ordered Wheat Belly for Kindle sometime early to middle August – pre-release date. I woke up Aug 30 to find it sitting there in the kKindle ready to be read and I must say I did enjoy and learn from it.

    I went wheatless over two years ago at Dr Davis’s recommendation primarily to reduce small LDL particles, a major player in my cardiovascular disease.

    One of the unintended side effects of wheat elimination for me has been a loss of approx 25 pounds. So I have begun that “not only unrealistic, (but) it’s dangerous” journey into oblivion. And I do miss those “essential (and disease-fighting!) nutrients it provides including fiber, antioxidants, iron and B vitamins” which are for sure are not present in my now ‘real food’ kind of eating. So I guess I’ll have to eat more real food to try to somehow gain those now absent nutrients maybe that will counteract that unintended side effect.

    I approached it from the opposite direction. I gave up grains to lose weight, then found that several ailments went away.

    Reply
  48. Angel

    Awful nice of the Grain Food Foundation people to stir up a controversy for Wheat Belly. Free publicity, anyone? I think Dr. Davis should send them a free copy of his book as a thank you gift. 😀

    My thoughts exactly. Their response was so pathetic, they only strengthened his cause.

    Reply

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