The Swedish Revolution, Glucose and Cancer

      70 Comments on The Swedish Revolution, Glucose and Cancer

Here are a couple of videos I think you’ll enjoy.  The first is a speech delivered by Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt at the Ancestral Health Symposium in which he describes causes of obesity and the diet revolution in Sweden, where he practices medicine.

If you don’t already read Dr. Eenfeldt’s new English-language blog, you should.

The second video is a lecture on how cancer cells hijack fuel.  If you weren’t already convinced it’s a bad idea to jack up your glucose level several times a day, this may do the trick.

I can’t believe a third of the students couldn’t answer the doctor’s final question correctly … how do you watch that lecture and conclude that dietary fat would increase the growth of tumors?


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70 thoughts on “The Swedish Revolution, Glucose and Cancer

  1. Bill

    Haven’t seen any comments among the blogs on Dr Oz’s article in Time Magazine this week. Funny how it has a huge ad for GlaxoSmithCline in the middle of it.

    I haven’t seen it. I’ll track it down if my blood pressure goes too low.

    Reply
  2. LXV

    “And these are future doctors … ?”

    What do you call the guy who graduates bottom of his class from medical school?

    Doctor.

    I think I had that doctor once.

    Reply
  3. Mark

    It’s amazing how all of this can be hidden from the public. I just read an article that explored the food pyramid’s history. It was found that most of the funding came from those in the processed food industry. After further nutrition studies have been conducted, and with the rise of technology, there is much more skepticism around the pyramid. I thought it was clear that it was incorrect based on the fact fries were considered a vegetable in school lunches. Anyone else have a problem with that?

    The food pyramid is a joke. The new Food Plate is the same joke, but re-written for what the USDA believes is an audience of full of idiots.

    Reply
  4. Bill

    Haven’t seen any comments among the blogs on Dr Oz’s article in Time Magazine this week. Funny how it has a huge ad for GlaxoSmithCline in the middle of it.

    I haven’t seen it. I’ll track it down if my blood pressure goes too low.

    Reply
  5. LXV

    “And these are future doctors … ?”

    What do you call the guy who graduates bottom of his class from medical school?

    Doctor.

    I think I had that doctor once.

    Reply
  6. Valerie

    Wow, so the Swedish government had alarmists telling them to put the smack down on the female doctor for her “dangerous” advice, did a two year investigation and concluded the diet was healthy AND stated as much to the public?

    What is the disconnect between our government and theirs? Is it the special interest groups? I’d really like to know.

    I suggested in one of my cruise talks that we pay some nutritionists to try to take down Dr. Mary Vernon. She’d kick their butts and become our version of the Swedish doctor who started a revolution.

    Reply
  7. Valerie

    Wow, so the Swedish government had alarmists telling them to put the smack down on the female doctor for her “dangerous” advice, did a two year investigation and concluded the diet was healthy AND stated as much to the public?

    What is the disconnect between our government and theirs? Is it the special interest groups? I’d really like to know.

    I suggested in one of my cruise talks that we pay some nutritionists to try to take down Dr. Mary Vernon. She’d kick their butts and become our version of the Swedish doctor who started a revolution.

    Reply
  8. Donna

    Thanks for posting Dr. Eenfeldt’s lecture. I somehow missed it when I was watching all of the other AHS lectures. His lecture gave so much information and was put together in such a way that it kept me riveted for the whole hour. I didn’t want it to end. It was such a great presentation. It was almost as entertaining as yours.

    The only downside of having so many speakers at the AHS is that we had to choose between two for each hour.

    Reply
  9. Donna

    Thanks for posting Dr. Eenfeldt’s lecture. I somehow missed it when I was watching all of the other AHS lectures. His lecture gave so much information and was put together in such a way that it kept me riveted for the whole hour. I didn’t want it to end. It was such a great presentation. It was almost as entertaining as yours.

    The only downside of having so many speakers at the AHS is that we had to choose between two for each hour.

    Reply
  10. CeeBee

    I’ve been thinking about those slides Dr. Eenfeldt used in his presentation that depicted the rise in obesity in the U.S. over the past 27 years. I live in MS and I was shocked to notice that in 27 years my state’s population has gone from less than 10% obesity to over 30%. How can this be?

    I’ve been wondering how the CDC measures “obese” and “overweight.” Can it be possible that we are not really any more fat than we’ve always been, but they’ve changed the definitions of “overweight” and “obese” on us?

    We’ve gotten fatter on average, but those figures are exaggerated, as I pointed out in the film. Our population is 10 years older on average than 30 years ago, and it’s not unusual for people to get heavier as they age. The real worry is the number of fat kids and the rise in rates of diabetes.

    Reply
  11. Josh

    Hi Tim.

    What is your opinion on sprouted wheat? Any difference between that stuff and the “run of the mill” wheat? A lot of the companies who offer this product claim they are more easily digestible carbohydrates. Sounds hinky to me.

    From what I’ve read, sprouted grains are better — many of the lectins are neutralized in the process — but I wouldn’t want to eat sprouted mutant wheat.

    Reply
  12. CeeBee

    I’ve been thinking about those slides Dr. Eenfeldt used in his presentation that depicted the rise in obesity in the U.S. over the past 27 years. I live in MS and I was shocked to notice that in 27 years my state’s population has gone from less than 10% obesity to over 30%. How can this be?

    I’ve been wondering how the CDC measures “obese” and “overweight.” Can it be possible that we are not really any more fat than we’ve always been, but they’ve changed the definitions of “overweight” and “obese” on us?

    We’ve gotten fatter on average, but those figures are exaggerated, as I pointed out in the film. Our population is 10 years older on average than 30 years ago, and it’s not unusual for people to get heavier as they age. The real worry is the number of fat kids and the rise in rates of diabetes.

    Reply
  13. Josh

    Hi Tim.

    What is your opinion on sprouted wheat? Any difference between that stuff and the “run of the mill” wheat? A lot of the companies who offer this product claim they are more easily digestible carbohydrates. Sounds hinky to me.

    From what I’ve read, sprouted grains are better — many of the lectins are neutralized in the process — but I wouldn’t want to eat sprouted mutant wheat.

    Reply
  14. Howard

    Bravo to the person who videotaped Dr. Eenfeldt’s lecture. It sure would have been nice if the same person had done the others at the AHS. It’s fine to show the lecturer every once in a while, but you miss so much when you can’t see the slide show.

    Dr. Eenfeldt took the time to edit his slides into the speech.

    Reply
  15. Howard

    Bravo to the person who videotaped Dr. Eenfeldt’s lecture. It sure would have been nice if the same person had done the others at the AHS. It’s fine to show the lecturer every once in a while, but you miss so much when you can’t see the slide show.

    Dr. Eenfeldt took the time to edit his slides into the speech.

    Reply
  16. Marcus Riedner

    Dr. Thompson is not a heart researcher so take his statements about the relationship between the current recommended dietary guide and heart disease with an appropriate grain of salt. There is plenty of heart health research that debunks that idea ( you can find some if it on this site even ). The key thrust here is that cancer and carbohydrates have a link.

    If you take that with the research from the heart health communities you get a picture that seems to say both heart disease and cancer are related to carbohydrate intake.

    Reply
  17. Marcus Riedner

    Dr. Thompson is not a heart researcher so take his statements about the relationship between the current recommended dietary guide and heart disease with an appropriate grain of salt. There is plenty of heart health research that debunks that idea ( you can find some if it on this site even ). The key thrust here is that cancer and carbohydrates have a link.

    If you take that with the research from the heart health communities you get a picture that seems to say both heart disease and cancer are related to carbohydrate intake.

    Reply

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