Book Review: Wheat Belly

      368 Comments on Book Review: Wheat Belly

I receive occasional emails and comments from people who can’t believe wheat isn’t health food. Some have quoted Bible passages about our daily bread, the staff of life, breaking bread with family, etc. Others have pointed out that Americans ate plenty of bread and other wheat products 100 years ago, but weren’t as likely to be fat and diabetic as people today.

I usually reply that the wheat products we consume today aren’t the same as those consumed by people in Biblical times, or even in more recent times. But I didn’t realize just how different today’s wheat is until I read Wheat Belly, a terrific new book by Dr. William Davis, the cardiologist you may already know from his Heart Scan Blog.

The title, of course, refers to the big gut that so many people today are carrying around in front of them these days.  While he’s no fan of sugar or other refined carbohydrates, Dr. Davis believes wheat is a primary (if not the primary) driver of the rise in obesity we’ve witnessed in the past quarter century, and he makes a strong case for that belief.   But getting fat is hardly the only price we pay for our love of bagels, breads, cereals and muffins. As Dr. Davis explains in the book’s introduction:

While much of the Wheat Belly story is about overweight, it is also about the complex and not fully understood range of diseases that have resulted from it – from celiac disease, the devastating intestinal disease that develops from exposure to wheat gluten, to an assortment of neurological disorders, curious rashes, and the paralyzing effects of schizophrenia. Documented peculiar effects of wheat on humans include appetite stimulation, exposure to brain-active exorphins (the counterpart of internally derived endorphins), exaggerated blood-sugar surges that trigger cycles of satiety alternating with increased appetite, the process of glycation that underlies diseases and aging, inflammatory and pH effects that erode cartilage and damage bone, and activation of disordered immune responses.

And later, in Part One:

There’s hardly a single organ system that is not in some way affected by wheat products. The health impact of Triticum aestivum, common bread wheat and its genetic brethren, ranges far and wide, with curious effects from mouth to anus, brain to pancreas, Appalachian housewife to Wall Street arbitrageur. If it sounds crazy, bear with me. I make these claims with a clear, wheat-free conscience.

In the rest of the book, Dr. Davis back up those claims. He delves into quite a bit of nutrition science and some biochemistry, but writes in a clear (and often humorous) style that makes for easy reading. As a doctor who’s treated thousands of patients, he has the added advantage of being able to cite case histories from his own practice – patients who came to him unknowingly damaged by wheat, but were cured by wheat-free diets.

One patient, a thirty-eight-year-old woman, was told by her doctor that she’d have to have part of her colon removed and replaced with an external bag. After Dr. Davis talked her into going wheat free, her colon healed itself. Another patient, a twenty-six-year-old man, was experiencing so much pain in his joints, he could barely walk. Three different rheumatologists failed to identify a cause. When he visited Dr. Davis for a heart condition, Dr. Davis suggested he try a wheat-free diet for the joint pain. Three months later, the young man strode into the office pain-free and reported he’d been jogging short distances and playing basketball. His heart condition had cleared up as well.

Before the chapters detailing the many ways wheat can damage our bodies and brains, Dr. Davis begins by recounting the history of wheat itself. It’s a fascinating story — in a Stephen King sort of way, that is. Here are a few quotes from that chapter, which is titled Not Your Grandma’s Muffins: The Creation of Modern Wheat.

Bread and other foods made from wheat have sustained humans for centuries, but the wheat of our ancestors is not the same as modern commercial wheat that reaches your breakfast, lunch and dinner table. From the original strains of wild grass harvested by early humans, wheat has exploded to more than 25,000 varieties, virtually all of them the result of human intervention.

The first wild, then cultivated, wheat was einkorn, the great-granddaddy of all subsequent wheat. Einkorn has the simplest genetic code of all wheat, containing only 14 chromosomes.

Shortly after the cultivation of the first einkorn plant, the emmer variety of wheat, the natural offspring of parents einkorn and an unrelated wild grass, Aegilops speltvoides or goatgrass, made its appearance in the Middle East. Goatgrass added its genetic code to that of einkorn, resulting in the more complex twenty-eight-chromosome emmer wheat.

Emmer wheat, Dr. Davis explains, was probably the wheat of biblical times. Later the emmer wheat mated naturally with another grass and produced Triticum aestivum, the forty-two-chromosome wheat that humans consumed for centuries – right up until the past 50 years or so. That’s when the story of wheat becomes a bit of a modern Frankenstein tale.

Like Dr. Frankenstein, the scientists who created today’s wheat had good intentions: the goal was to produce more wheat per acre in a shorter span of time, thus vastly increasing yields and preventing worldwide starvation as the planet’s population swelled. To that extent, they succeeded. Geneticist Dr. Norman Borlaug, who created the short, stocky, fast-growing “dwarf” wheat most of us consume today, is credited with saving perhaps a billion people from starvation.

The problem is that dwarf wheat varieties were developed through a combination of cross-breeding and gene splicing. The result is a mutant plant with a genetic code that never existed in nature before. In fact, today’s wheat literally can’t survive in a natural setting. Take away the modern pesticides and fertilizers and it’s (pardon the pun) toast.

Perhaps overjoyed at the prospect of the feeding the world, the developers of modern wheat varieties weren’t interested in conducting tests to see if these genetically-modified strains were actually fit for human consumption. Dr. Davis believes they’re not. At the very least, we’re now consuming wheat that’s genetically different from what our ancestors consumed:

Analyses of proteins expressed by a wheat hybrid compared to its two parent strains have demonstrated that while approximately 95 percent of the proteins expressed in the offspring are the same, five percent are unique, found in neither parent. Wheat gluten proteins, in particular, undergo considerable structural change with hybridization. In one hybridization experiment, fourteen new gluten proteins were identified in the offspring that were not present in either parent plant. Moreover, when compared to century-old stains of wheat, modern strains of Triticum aestivum express a higher quantity of genes for gluten proteins that are associated with celiac disease.

Hybridization efforts of the past fifty years have generated numerous additional changes in the gluten-coding genes in Triticum aestivum, most of them purposeful modifications of the “D” genome that confer baking and aesthetic characteristics on flour. It is therefore the the “D” genome of modern Triticum aestivum that, having been the focus of all manner of shenanigans by plant geneticists, has accumulated substantial changes in genetically determined characteristics of gluten proteins.

In other word’s, this ain’t your grandma’s wheat.  Little wonder that when researchers compared blood samples taken from thousand of soldiers 50 years ago to blood samples from today’s soldiers, they found that celiac antibodies are five times more common today among today’s soliders.

Dr. Davis recounts an experiment he conducted on himself to compare the different impacts of ancient wheat and modern wheat on his blood sugar. He managed to find some einkorn wheat and made bread from it. Two slices of that bread raised his blood sugar from 86 mg/dl to 110. Not bad. Then he made bread from modern whole wheat – you know, the stuff the USDA says is the key to great health. Two slices raised his blood sugar from 84 mg/dl to 167. That’s diabetes territory. As Dr. Davis writes in another chapter after explaining the specific types of carbohydrates found in wheat:

Wheat products elevate blood sugar levels more than virtually any other carbohydrate, from beans to candy bars.

As the graph I displayed in a previous post showed, the typical American consumes somewhere around 1,000 calories per day in the form of sugars and grains.  Our dominant grain by far is wheat — wheat that was never part of the human diet until 50 years ago.

The rest of the book details the damage modern wheat can do to our bodies and brains, with plenty of references to both academic studies and case histories from Dr. Davis’ medical practice. He covers the addictive properties of wheat, the effects wheat can produce in our brains (including actual brain damage), and of course the many ways wheat can wreak havoc on our digestive systems. Compared to those chapters, the chapters on skin conditions, accelerated aging, and heart disease seem almost tame. Sure, it’s not good to produce mostly small, dense LDL … but heart disease will kill you later. Untreated celiac disease will make you miserable for life – and most celiac sufferers are never diagnosed.

This is an excellent book, and also an important book. A story a co-worker told me last week illustrates why: his wife suffered from debilitating headaches for years. She went from doctor to doctor, but none could offer an explanation or solution, other than pain medications that basically knocked her out. Then a few months ago, she mentioned the headaches to some acquaintances over dinner. One of them – not a doctor – told her the headaches could be caused by a reaction to wheat gluten and suggested she try a gluten-free diet. She did … and headaches went away.

As my co-worker told me, “I’m glad someone finally gave her the answer, but why did she have to hear this from some Joe Schmoe after years of suffering? Why didn’t any of the doctors we consulted think of that?”

The doctors didn’t think of that because they weren’t trained to think of that. Ask the vast majority of doctors for dietary advice, and they’ll tell you to limit your fats and eat your “healthy whole grains.” They can’t teach what they don’t know.

I hope you all read this book. But more than that, I hope you buy a copy and stick it in your doctor’s hands. The next time a patient shows up suffering from splitting headaches (or irritable bowel, or stomach cramps, or acne, or psoriasis, or depression, or emotional problems, or high triglycerides, or high blood sugar, or arthritis, or asthma), perhaps the doctor will take a careful dietary history and suggest trying a wheat-free diet before reaching for the prescription pad.

Next week I’ll be posting a Q & A with Dr. Davis.  I have a list of questions I want to ask, but if you have questions of your own, post them in a comment.  I’ll pick some to add to my list.

 


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368 thoughts on “Book Review: Wheat Belly

  1. kelsey

    I am all aboard for this diet but buying healthy is so hard for a poor college kid. Any economically friendly solutions to cutting out wheat without spending so much?

    Load up on the cheaper protein sources at a big-box store. Tuna, hamburger, eggs, etc., are good choices.

  2. kelsey

    I am all aboard for this diet but buying healthy is so hard for a poor college kid. Any economically friendly solutions to cutting out wheat without spending so much?

    Load up on the cheaper protein sources at a big-box store. Tuna, hamburger, eggs, etc., are good choices.

  3. Sue

    To Nick in CT: Yes, beer contains gluten unless it is made from another grain. You can find gluten-free beers now in some markets.

  4. Sue

    To Nick in CT: Yes, beer contains gluten unless it is made from another grain. You can find gluten-free beers now in some markets.

  5. Star

    After numerous tests and symtoms getting worse for my son I was recommended by my aunt that I read The Wheat Belly book. OMG!! My husband and Partners are OB/GYNs and also run a Weight loss clinic. After the patients go through the first phase they start them back on healthy eating including Wheat. Upon reading this book they are looking to impliment a new plan.
    We started our son and me on the wheat free diet two weeks ago and his Dermatigraphia (a horrible itchy rash that would come out of no where and leave whelts), migraines, Short term memory loss, stomach issues, a very swollen face most of the time and even though we ate healthy and exercised he also had stomach fat. He was having diarrea asthma and cronic fatigue at only age 9 and we have been through numerous tests to find answers, have all disappeared!!!! He had a sweet roll about a week ago and broke out in a horrible rash. few days later he had a piece of pizza and a cookie and immediately got a migrain! I told him he could try a sandwhich at a lunch place and he refused and said, no mommy I am not having any more wheat it makes me feel aweful!! The puffy face has gone away and his lower abdomin is going away! My adult acne and fatigue is gone!
    We just started our daughter 7yrs old on wheat free and her head aches and tummy aches have not come back.
    My husband is going to be the hardest since he is a very busy and the quick grabs are so convienient. He is also a type 1 diabetic with such extreme highs and lows even with him checking his sugars 5-6 times a day!

    Thanks for writing the book Dr. Davis!!!

  6. Star

    After numerous tests and symtoms getting worse for my son I was recommended by my aunt that I read The Wheat Belly book. OMG!! My husband and Partners are OB/GYNs and also run a Weight loss clinic. After the patients go through the first phase they start them back on healthy eating including Wheat. Upon reading this book they are looking to impliment a new plan.
    We started our son and me on the wheat free diet two weeks ago and his Dermatigraphia (a horrible itchy rash that would come out of no where and leave whelts), migraines, Short term memory loss, stomach issues, a very swollen face most of the time and even though we ate healthy and exercised he also had stomach fat. He was having diarrea asthma and cronic fatigue at only age 9 and we have been through numerous tests to find answers, have all disappeared!!!! He had a sweet roll about a week ago and broke out in a horrible rash. few days later he had a piece of pizza and a cookie and immediately got a migrain! I told him he could try a sandwhich at a lunch place and he refused and said, no mommy I am not having any more wheat it makes me feel aweful!! The puffy face has gone away and his lower abdomin is going away! My adult acne and fatigue is gone!
    We just started our daughter 7yrs old on wheat free and her head aches and tummy aches have not come back.
    My husband is going to be the hardest since he is a very busy and the quick grabs are so convienient. He is also a type 1 diabetic with such extreme highs and lows even with him checking his sugars 5-6 times a day!

    Thanks for writing the book Dr. Davis!!!

  7. Suz

    I too am just a few days into abstaining from all wheat products but the difference is measurable. I have dropped 5 lbs already, I am not cruising the cupboards and the fridge all day and late into the evenings for “something”. I feel satisfied and comfortable. I feel hungry at mealtimes, novel for me! This is a lifestyle change thank you. One question I do have is how my body will react (in theory) to having wheat occasionally. We have friends that we see occasionally and our hosts pizza is his pride and joy. I intend to take a salad with me this weekend and make no excuses that I will not eat the pizza. But I am curious as to what effect one slice of pizza would have.

    I eat pizza on rare occasions, maybe 2-3 times per year. Enjoy, but get back on track the next day.

  8. Suz

    I too am just a few days into abstaining from all wheat products but the difference is measurable. I have dropped 5 lbs already, I am not cruising the cupboards and the fridge all day and late into the evenings for “something”. I feel satisfied and comfortable. I feel hungry at mealtimes, novel for me! This is a lifestyle change thank you. One question I do have is how my body will react (in theory) to having wheat occasionally. We have friends that we see occasionally and our hosts pizza is his pride and joy. I intend to take a salad with me this weekend and make no excuses that I will not eat the pizza. But I am curious as to what effect one slice of pizza would have.

    I eat pizza on rare occasions, maybe 2-3 times per year. Enjoy, but get back on track the next day.

  9. Afke

    I write a food-health column for a few country newspapers and dove into wheat belly at the suggestion of a friend. This week’s column will tackle wheat! Thanks to this excellent book review and all the kind people that take the time to share their experience I hope to hit a chord or two with arthritis sufferers.
    Suggesting to people to junk their bread is like trying to take away their first born. I did not know about the connection between arthritis and wheat.
    I am a raw chef ( a career change 5 years ago) and rarely if ever listen to child hood whispered memories of jam and toast. I have replaced all wheat products with dehydrated sprouted buckwheat crackers, or nuts and flax seed cookies. I love to eat well and have searched and found that fresh food tastes great and offers an endless variety of amazing meals. I am 63 years old and feel younger, fitter and happier than 15 years ago. Menopause was a calm and “cool” event. Check out Green smoothies for your fastest wheat free breakfast or lunch. I am with you on the pizza advice!

  10. Afke

    I write a food-health column for a few country newspapers and dove into wheat belly at the suggestion of a friend. This week’s column will tackle wheat! Thanks to this excellent book review and all the kind people that take the time to share their experience I hope to hit a chord or two with arthritis sufferers.
    Suggesting to people to junk their bread is like trying to take away their first born. I did not know about the connection between arthritis and wheat.
    I am a raw chef ( a career change 5 years ago) and rarely if ever listen to child hood whispered memories of jam and toast. I have replaced all wheat products with dehydrated sprouted buckwheat crackers, or nuts and flax seed cookies. I love to eat well and have searched and found that fresh food tastes great and offers an endless variety of amazing meals. I am 63 years old and feel younger, fitter and happier than 15 years ago. Menopause was a calm and “cool” event. Check out Green smoothies for your fastest wheat free breakfast or lunch. I am with you on the pizza advice!

  11. clare mckay

    Are rice bread and rice crackers o.k. to eat?

    You won’t get the gluten and lectin load that you’d get from wheat, but you’d still be eating a lot of processed carbohydrate.

  12. clare mckay

    Are rice bread and rice crackers o.k. to eat?

    You won’t get the gluten and lectin load that you’d get from wheat, but you’d still be eating a lot of processed carbohydrate.

  13. mmmwww

    I am making delicious meals from Dr. Davis’ book but my husband really misses bread. He just has a slice of commercial Gluten free bread a day but I wish there was a bread recipe that I could make him. Is a spelt bread better than what he’s using? Or what about millet bread? Thanks for your reply.

    Dr. Davis considers those grains not as bad as wheat, but not particularly good for us.

  14. mmmwww

    I am making delicious meals from Dr. Davis’ book but my husband really misses bread. He just has a slice of commercial Gluten free bread a day but I wish there was a bread recipe that I could make him. Is a spelt bread better than what he’s using? Or what about millet bread? Thanks for your reply.

    Dr. Davis considers those grains not as bad as wheat, but not particularly good for us.

  15. Cyndi

    I am a 56 year old diabetic. I am not and never have been overweight. I have a severe history of hypothiroidism, and elevated cholesterol, since early childhood.
    I have spent years being a “good” patient – doing everything the doctors (Endocrinologist and internist) and the dietetian advised. Every time I followed their advice or the eating plan of the ADA I would have raging glucose and have to increase my insulin. I would feel sluggish and “puffy”. I found, through trial and error, over many years that grain products: bread, cake, cookies, muffins, rolls, biscuits, crackers of ANY kind (including the ones I found at “health food” stores) would spike by blood sugar and worsen al the above mentioned symptoms. I chose to modify my diet – My doctors and diet advisors take the credit for my slender frame and my well controlled glucose – – but, I do NOT do what they say – – I do what I MUST to be healthy. I don’t look my age, I look, act and feel younger than any of my peers who Constantly ask for diet advice and then refuse to adopt my eating habits because they think I have a “strange diet”.
    It was only yesterday when Dr. Davis explained and confirmed my diet choices that I felt truly empowered to live and eat MY way! The doctors just need to catch up! They are astounded by my appearance and my lab results – NOW, I can explain WHY I have disobeyed them in order to thrive! Thank you!!! I am living proof that the no wheat/whole grain diet works LONG TERM!

    It’s too bad you had to learn by trial and error, though. You should have gotten that advice from your doctor from the start.

  16. Cyndi

    I am a 56 year old diabetic. I am not and never have been overweight. I have a severe history of hypothiroidism, and elevated cholesterol, since early childhood.
    I have spent years being a “good” patient – doing everything the doctors (Endocrinologist and internist) and the dietetian advised. Every time I followed their advice or the eating plan of the ADA I would have raging glucose and have to increase my insulin. I would feel sluggish and “puffy”. I found, through trial and error, over many years that grain products: bread, cake, cookies, muffins, rolls, biscuits, crackers of ANY kind (including the ones I found at “health food” stores) would spike by blood sugar and worsen al the above mentioned symptoms. I chose to modify my diet – My doctors and diet advisors take the credit for my slender frame and my well controlled glucose – – but, I do NOT do what they say – – I do what I MUST to be healthy. I don’t look my age, I look, act and feel younger than any of my peers who Constantly ask for diet advice and then refuse to adopt my eating habits because they think I have a “strange diet”.
    It was only yesterday when Dr. Davis explained and confirmed my diet choices that I felt truly empowered to live and eat MY way! The doctors just need to catch up! They are astounded by my appearance and my lab results – NOW, I can explain WHY I have disobeyed them in order to thrive! Thank you!!! I am living proof that the no wheat/whole grain diet works LONG TERM!

    It’s too bad you had to learn by trial and error, though. You should have gotten that advice from your doctor from the start.

  17. Cynthia

    OK, I believe you. Modern wheat contains proteins that humans did not evolve to digest, so people who are sensitive to them have bad health outcomes (including obesity) that can be improved or fixed by avoiding modern wheat.

    But that’s not the whole answer and being rude to people with a different perspective is not evidence that Wheat Belly is The Truth and The Way.

    Television became available 50 years ago. We have had 50 years of propaganda and brainwashing along the lines that we deserve a break today, and that break consists of eating hign-calorie, low-nutrition food irregardless of whether our hunger is emotional or physical. After 50 years of this, We Believe you can fill the hole with food.

    People eat food they’re not hungry for because it’s very comforting, at least while we’re eating it. In a world that offers very little comfort, food works, and that’s the problem. It doesn’t help that exercise is no longer natually part of the day, and that junk food (usually made of corn, by the way) is so cheap and universally available that even third world people now have problems with obesity. Telling “fat” people that they need to cut down is like telling depressed people that all they need to do is buck up.

    I think that the answer to obesity lies in brain research, and that the answer will likely be a new discipline that enables one to improve brain power and skill at self-soothing. That discipline might perhaps also include a method to detect exaggerated appetite and an effective, safe drug to curb it. Keep in mind that people eat when they’re not hungry and/or don’t stop eating when they’re full, so an appetite-curbing drug is not the answer, much like Antabuse is not the whole answer to alcoholism.

    It would help if we had laws against advertising that hounds us to eat. Fat chance!

    There have been cultures with very high rates of obesity where there was no fast-food industry, no television, no advertising, and plenty of hard physical labor in day-to-day life. You’re shooting at the wrong targets. Outlawing ads you don’t like while the same government that would enforce that law continues pushing grains as health food … sound like an effective plan?

  18. Cynthia

    OK, I believe you. Modern wheat contains proteins that humans did not evolve to digest, so people who are sensitive to them have bad health outcomes (including obesity) that can be improved or fixed by avoiding modern wheat.

    But that’s not the whole answer and being rude to people with a different perspective is not evidence that Wheat Belly is The Truth and The Way.

    Television became available 50 years ago. We have had 50 years of propaganda and brainwashing along the lines that we deserve a break today, and that break consists of eating hign-calorie, low-nutrition food irregardless of whether our hunger is emotional or physical. After 50 years of this, We Believe you can fill the hole with food.

    People eat food they’re not hungry for because it’s very comforting, at least while we’re eating it. In a world that offers very little comfort, food works, and that’s the problem. It doesn’t help that exercise is no longer natually part of the day, and that junk food (usually made of corn, by the way) is so cheap and universally available that even third world people now have problems with obesity. Telling “fat” people that they need to cut down is like telling depressed people that all they need to do is buck up.

    I think that the answer to obesity lies in brain research, and that the answer will likely be a new discipline that enables one to improve brain power and skill at self-soothing. That discipline might perhaps also include a method to detect exaggerated appetite and an effective, safe drug to curb it. Keep in mind that people eat when they’re not hungry and/or don’t stop eating when they’re full, so an appetite-curbing drug is not the answer, much like Antabuse is not the whole answer to alcoholism.

    It would help if we had laws against advertising that hounds us to eat. Fat chance!

    There have been cultures with very high rates of obesity where there was no fast-food industry, no television, no advertising, and plenty of hard physical labor in day-to-day life. You’re shooting at the wrong targets. Outlawing ads you don’t like while the same government that would enforce that law continues pushing grains as health food … sound like an effective plan?

  19. Jean Williamson

    Look up the contents of modified milk ingredients that can be found in low fat products. Sometimes they contain sugar and the product is being used as an aid to losing weight.

  20. Jean Williamson

    Look up the contents of modified milk ingredients that can be found in low fat products. Sometimes they contain sugar and the product is being used as an aid to losing weight.

  21. Rwflowers

    I am a 47year old female heart patient. I have 1 stent that was put in August of 2010. I had Angioplasty in December of 2011. My cardiologist has been on my back about getting my diabeties “under control” my A1C was 6.6. By ADA standards not alarming. I went to my family doctor and explained what I was up against, she said she understood his concern but didn’t believe medication was going to help me much, so she recommended Wheat Belly (she had been recently diagnosed with Celiac). I got the book about 4 days after my appointment and OMG! I can’t believe the difference in mine and my families lives! As I read the book I realized that not only did the book fit my situation as far as the diabetes issues, but my husband had to be glueten intolerant, he had the big “Wheat Belly” swollen joints, loose stools, adult acne etc…we both went wheat free 7 weeks ago. As far as I am concerned we will never go back. He says he feels so much better, no more trips to the bathroom, swollen joints are a thing of the past, acne is gone along with 25 pounds (no more Wheat Belly!) He works with several women who think he is totally crazy when he tries to explain what he is doing to attain such results. They tell him that fat causes fat and that he is just going to quit this cause it will never work. I have ran into the same issues with various people I just tell them to read the book and they will never look at food the same way again. Most just laugh because they can’t get past the Low Fat/Whole Grain concept of healthy eating. I plan on taking my book with me when I go for my next cardiologist check up in March this is one time I can’t wait to get my blood drawn, I know he will be pleased with the results as well as the 19 lbs I have lost. The one unfortunate thing I have noticed is that my family doctor who works in a clinic type setting can’t openly talk about the benefits for fear of ridicule from her peers. Changing the minds of those that are conditioned to believe the USDA food pyramid/plate mindset is going to be a major undertaking but one that is much needed in this country.

    We’ll get them … one doctor at a time if need be.

  22. Rwflowers

    I am a 47year old female heart patient. I have 1 stent that was put in August of 2010. I had Angioplasty in December of 2011. My cardiologist has been on my back about getting my diabeties “under control” my A1C was 6.6. By ADA standards not alarming. I went to my family doctor and explained what I was up against, she said she understood his concern but didn’t believe medication was going to help me much, so she recommended Wheat Belly (she had been recently diagnosed with Celiac). I got the book about 4 days after my appointment and OMG! I can’t believe the difference in mine and my families lives! As I read the book I realized that not only did the book fit my situation as far as the diabetes issues, but my husband had to be glueten intolerant, he had the big “Wheat Belly” swollen joints, loose stools, adult acne etc…we both went wheat free 7 weeks ago. As far as I am concerned we will never go back. He says he feels so much better, no more trips to the bathroom, swollen joints are a thing of the past, acne is gone along with 25 pounds (no more Wheat Belly!) He works with several women who think he is totally crazy when he tries to explain what he is doing to attain such results. They tell him that fat causes fat and that he is just going to quit this cause it will never work. I have ran into the same issues with various people I just tell them to read the book and they will never look at food the same way again. Most just laugh because they can’t get past the Low Fat/Whole Grain concept of healthy eating. I plan on taking my book with me when I go for my next cardiologist check up in March this is one time I can’t wait to get my blood drawn, I know he will be pleased with the results as well as the 19 lbs I have lost. The one unfortunate thing I have noticed is that my family doctor who works in a clinic type setting can’t openly talk about the benefits for fear of ridicule from her peers. Changing the minds of those that are conditioned to believe the USDA food pyramid/plate mindset is going to be a major undertaking but one that is much needed in this country.

    We’ll get them … one doctor at a time if need be.

  23. Drew @ Willpower Is For Fat Pe

    @Rwflowers
    Wow, your husbands co-workers have access to a time machine? Either that or they just have a really weak gasp on verb tenses.

    “How did you lose all that weight?”

    I stopped eating wheat and now eat a high-fat diet.

    “That won’t work.”

    Umm …

  24. Drew @ Willpower Is For Fat People

    @Rwflowers
    Wow, your husbands co-workers have access to a time machine? Either that or they just have a really weak gasp on verb tenses.

    “How did you lose all that weight?”

    I stopped eating wheat and now eat a high-fat diet.

    “That won’t work.”

    Umm …

  25. Dr. Kareen Oosterhart, D.C.

    I read Dr. Davis book last December and made up my mind I was going to challenge my patients. In my newsletter last month we set up a wheat free challenge for the month of March. The first informative meeting will be March 3rd. I am interested in seeing the changes in my patients health expression after a month off wheat. I will let you know the results. For me the results have been better breathing and less inflammation overall. I am so thankful for the information Dr. Davis supplied in such and easy read. Thank you for your review as well.
    Kareen L. Oosterhart, D.C.

    Definitely let me know how your patients respond.

  26. Dr. Kareen Oosterhart, D.C.

    I read Dr. Davis book last December and made up my mind I was going to challenge my patients. In my newsletter last month we set up a wheat free challenge for the month of March. The first informative meeting will be March 3rd. I am interested in seeing the changes in my patients health expression after a month off wheat. I will let you know the results. For me the results have been better breathing and less inflammation overall. I am so thankful for the information Dr. Davis supplied in such and easy read. Thank you for your review as well.
    Kareen L. Oosterhart, D.C.

    Definitely let me know how your patients respond.

  27. Rosemary Ash

    Finally! I had such bad skin rashes as a teenager that I was put on Tetracycline daily for YEARS! All I really neded to do was not eat all the baked goods, pasta and breads that were causing my ill health. Now, with a compromised immune system due to the antibiotic I find myself trying to boost my immunity with vitamins and smoothies. Many years ago a friend told me about Pantothenic Acid for my skin condition. It worked! Then I was in a place where I couldn’t get it. You guessed it, my skin condition returned. So I looked it up and found that it is present in all foods but not assimilated by people who have celiac. Ok, that meant more research and when I read the symptoms of that disease they were describing my life! Doctors had recommended wheat bran and whole grains for my “difficult” digestive system. Big mistake! I was always hungry and sluggish and never had a pain-free day. After reading about celiac I quit consuming wheat and voila! I’ve never looked back. I still, nine years later, deal with residual effects of a skin condition called prurigo nodularis, a disease that nobody has come up with a cause or cure for but is noted to be suffered by those allergic to wheat! It’s just about gone now and I’ll never knowlingly eat wheat again. I can’t believe people are willing to suffer IBS and skin conditions, and migrane headaches just so they can eat their darn donuts! Wise up people. Read the book! Heal yourselves!

  28. Rosemary Ash

    Finally! I had such bad skin rashes as a teenager that I was put on Tetracycline daily for YEARS! All I really neded to do was not eat all the baked goods, pasta and breads that were causing my ill health. Now, with a compromised immune system due to the antibiotic I find myself trying to boost my immunity with vitamins and smoothies. Many years ago a friend told me about Pantothenic Acid for my skin condition. It worked! Then I was in a place where I couldn’t get it. You guessed it, my skin condition returned. So I looked it up and found that it is present in all foods but not assimilated by people who have celiac. Ok, that meant more research and when I read the symptoms of that disease they were describing my life! Doctors had recommended wheat bran and whole grains for my “difficult” digestive system. Big mistake! I was always hungry and sluggish and never had a pain-free day. After reading about celiac I quit consuming wheat and voila! I’ve never looked back. I still, nine years later, deal with residual effects of a skin condition called prurigo nodularis, a disease that nobody has come up with a cause or cure for but is noted to be suffered by those allergic to wheat! It’s just about gone now and I’ll never knowlingly eat wheat again. I can’t believe people are willing to suffer IBS and skin conditions, and migrane headaches just so they can eat their darn donuts! Wise up people. Read the book! Heal yourselves!

  29. Marianne

    I’ve been tall and slender all my life, still am except for 5 -7 pounds I put on around my belly during menopause. Same time my BP elevated and I now take Lisinopril. I was also dignosed with IBS about 20 years ago. I picked up Wheat Belly at the library and scanned it really with the hope of improving my IBS symptoms and paring down this belly fat. I read Wheat Belly and eliminated all wheat and any flour containing products, plus no oatmeal, or rice. It’s been two weeks today and I have seen zero improvement, no weight loss, and no IBS improvement. It is very disheartening. I’d like to know if anyone has a suggestion as to how long I should continue before I can say it’s not going to work for me? I realize two weeks is too brief, any ideas? I might add I’ve never been one to be influenced by the placebo effect.

    Look at it this way: there’s no biological need for wheat, so you may as well give it some time to see what happens. I’d also suggest giving up other grains and sugar if you haven’t already.

  30. Shelley

    My mother sent me an advertisement flyer to read about “wheat belly”. As I read the description about symptoms, I thought my life had just been outlined before me! I am ordering the book and stopping wheat today!

  31. Marianne

    I’ve been tall and slender all my life, still am except for 5 -7 pounds I put on around my belly during menopause. Same time my BP elevated and I now take Lisinopril. I was also dignosed with IBS about 20 years ago. I picked up Wheat Belly at the library and scanned it really with the hope of improving my IBS symptoms and paring down this belly fat. I read Wheat Belly and eliminated all wheat and any flour containing products, plus no oatmeal, or rice. It’s been two weeks today and I have seen zero improvement, no weight loss, and no IBS improvement. It is very disheartening. I’d like to know if anyone has a suggestion as to how long I should continue before I can say it’s not going to work for me? I realize two weeks is too brief, any ideas? I might add I’ve never been one to be influenced by the placebo effect.

    Look at it this way: there’s no biological need for wheat, so you may as well give it some time to see what happens. I’d also suggest giving up other grains and sugar if you haven’t already.

  32. Shelley

    My mother sent me an advertisement flyer to read about “wheat belly”. As I read the description about symptoms, I thought my life had just been outlined before me! I am ordering the book and stopping wheat today!

  33. Lorie

    Wheat Free is not a “diet” or a “fad” it is a lifestyle change! My husband and I have been wheat free for about one and half years. After being diagnosed with diabetes I started going to the gym five times a week. I tried to watch what I ate and attended diabetes classes that informed us we should only eat “whole grains”. So I followed this for 18 months, working out and eating “whole grains” I did not lose a pound. I was getting very depressed and was feeling extremely lethargic especially in the afternoons after eating my “whole grain” sandwich, or my high fiber bar. A Doctor that I work with suggested that I try a No Grain lifestyle approach. My husband and I changed our eating habits together. Low and behold the weight started falling off. Within 9 weeks I was off my diabetes medication, as well as my cholesterol medications. My husband lost 30 pounds in 9 weeks and I lost 16 pounds in the same amount of time. My husband’s sore joints disappeared and I have been free from debilitating headaches. Today a year and half later my husband is 80 pounds lighter and I am 35 pounds lighter ( we now have normalized our BMI ) I was so thrilled to see Dr. Davis come out with this book. I hope that others will give this a try too !

    Those are excellent results. You were lucky to find a doctor who made that suggestion.

  34. Lorie

    Wheat Free is not a “diet” or a “fad” it is a lifestyle change! My husband and I have been wheat free for about one and half years. After being diagnosed with diabetes I started going to the gym five times a week. I tried to watch what I ate and attended diabetes classes that informed us we should only eat “whole grains”. So I followed this for 18 months, working out and eating “whole grains” I did not lose a pound. I was getting very depressed and was feeling extremely lethargic especially in the afternoons after eating my “whole grain” sandwich, or my high fiber bar. A Doctor that I work with suggested that I try a No Grain lifestyle approach. My husband and I changed our eating habits together. Low and behold the weight started falling off. Within 9 weeks I was off my diabetes medication, as well as my cholesterol medications. My husband lost 30 pounds in 9 weeks and I lost 16 pounds in the same amount of time. My husband’s sore joints disappeared and I have been free from debilitating headaches. Today a year and half later my husband is 80 pounds lighter and I am 35 pounds lighter ( we now have normalized our BMI ) I was so thrilled to see Dr. Davis come out with this book. I hope that others will give this a try too !

    Those are excellent results. You were lucky to find a doctor who made that suggestion.

  35. Diane DeVore

    I was so encouraged by reading Wheat Belly that I started eating wheat free while I was reading it. I have struggled with my weight for many, many years, always near 190 pounds. The only medication I take is Synthroid 0.15 mg. No matter what i do the weight will not come off. It has been nearly a month now since I faithfully began this. Unfortunately, I just weighed today, after one month on this, and I am up 4 pounds. I left the doctor’s office in tears. I have been consistently at 186 for years. Now following this I am up to 190 pounds. To say I am discouraged is an understatement. How can this possibly be when you have a boiled egg for breakfast, a salad with no dressing for lunch, and grilled chicken and a veg. for dinner. I never snacked before starting this. Now I try to eat a small yogurt or something with protein in between meals because I know I need to eat more – even though I am not hungry. I don’t eat sweets either. My husband is a type 1 diabetic so we already ate healthy. My only crutch is a diet coke. How can this possibly be?

    Wheat can cause weight gain, but it’s not the only possible cause. If you’re gaining weight on so little food, there’s something hormonal going on. I can only suggest you ask your doctor to run some tests for hormone imbalances.

  36. Diane DeVore

    I was so encouraged by reading Wheat Belly that I started eating wheat free while I was reading it. I have struggled with my weight for many, many years, always near 190 pounds. The only medication I take is Synthroid 0.15 mg. No matter what i do the weight will not come off. It has been nearly a month now since I faithfully began this. Unfortunately, I just weighed today, after one month on this, and I am up 4 pounds. I left the doctor’s office in tears. I have been consistently at 186 for years. Now following this I am up to 190 pounds. To say I am discouraged is an understatement. How can this possibly be when you have a boiled egg for breakfast, a salad with no dressing for lunch, and grilled chicken and a veg. for dinner. I never snacked before starting this. Now I try to eat a small yogurt or something with protein in between meals because I know I need to eat more – even though I am not hungry. I don’t eat sweets either. My husband is a type 1 diabetic so we already ate healthy. My only crutch is a diet coke. How can this possibly be?

    Wheat can cause weight gain, but it’s not the only possible cause. If you’re gaining weight on so little food, there’s something hormonal going on. I can only suggest you ask your doctor to run some tests for hormone imbalances.

  37. gallier2

    Diane, where’s the fat? Your menu example looks really awfully bland and uninteresting and extremly low calories. No wonder your body switches to conservation mode. You won’t be satisfied by protein alone, your liver cannot derive enough calories from proteins to sustain a body normally. You have to add serious calories to your diet, seems counterintuitive at first but is logical when one thinks about it correctly.
    What would be your daily caloric need if you were at your ideal weight? Something around 2000 kcal (I don’t know how tall you are). So imagine what your body does when it gets only 1000 kcal (and that’s counted generously for your example), it will sense loud and clearly STARVATION, SLOW DOWN METABOLISM until better times come.
    So you have to give your body the impression that there is no shortage of fuel and that it can function at normal rate.
    You have 2 possible fuels for that carbs or fat. Carbs have the advantage of being cheap and fast, but are substantially metabolized differently than fats, your main fuel reserve.
    This means that if you provide the main part of your caloric intake as carbs, your cells will have to switch always from carb burning to fat burning and back. This machinery is complex (insulin being the main agent) and will wear out with time and the switching from one fuel will be harder and harder, until a point where your cells will have problems handling fat. Furthermore, every bit of carb that is not immediatly used or doesn’t fit in the small reservoir for it (glycogen), will be converted to fat.
    If your main caloric component of your diet is fat, your body will have less difficulty to switch from the food calories to the reserve calories, because there is no switching. This is the reason why low-carb high-fat diet work so good once the body is not in carb mode anymore. Your metabolism will be always in fat crunching mode and it can get at the reserves it has made before, a thing that it couldn’t before.
    If you understand this simplified description, you will also understand why you have to kick-start the process by eating a lot of fat at the beginning of the process, this is the rationale behind Atkins’ induction phase.
    This doesn’t mean it is the only way to do it. Dr.Lutz preferred a more progressive change toward low-carb, especially the older one. His reason had more to do with auto-immune and inflammation which tend to be worse at the beginning of the switch.

    To make it short, eat more fat, much, much more fat and the best fats are animal fats, bacon grease, duck and goose fat, lard, tallow, butter, heavy cream. In liquid oils, avoid poly-unsatured ones, they are outright dangerous, use olive oil for salads.
    Full-fat cheese, high-cocoa chocolates, coconut are good sources of fats.

  38. gallier2

    Diane, where’s the fat? Your menu example looks really awfully bland and uninteresting and extremly low calories. No wonder your body switches to conservation mode. You won’t be satisfied by protein alone, your liver cannot derive enough calories from proteins to sustain a body normally. You have to add serious calories to your diet, seems counterintuitive at first but is logical when one thinks about it correctly.
    What would be your daily caloric need if you were at your ideal weight? Something around 2000 kcal (I don’t know how tall you are). So imagine what your body does when it gets only 1000 kcal (and that’s counted generously for your example), it will sense loud and clearly STARVATION, SLOW DOWN METABOLISM until better times come.
    So you have to give your body the impression that there is no shortage of fuel and that it can function at normal rate.
    You have 2 possible fuels for that carbs or fat. Carbs have the advantage of being cheap and fast, but are substantially metabolized differently than fats, your main fuel reserve.
    This means that if you provide the main part of your caloric intake as carbs, your cells will have to switch always from carb burning to fat burning and back. This machinery is complex (insulin being the main agent) and will wear out with time and the switching from one fuel will be harder and harder, until a point where your cells will have problems handling fat. Furthermore, every bit of carb that is not immediatly used or doesn’t fit in the small reservoir for it (glycogen), will be converted to fat.
    If your main caloric component of your diet is fat, your body will have less difficulty to switch from the food calories to the reserve calories, because there is no switching. This is the reason why low-carb high-fat diet work so good once the body is not in carb mode anymore. Your metabolism will be always in fat crunching mode and it can get at the reserves it has made before, a thing that it couldn’t before.
    If you understand this simplified description, you will also understand why you have to kick-start the process by eating a lot of fat at the beginning of the process, this is the rationale behind Atkins’ induction phase.
    This doesn’t mean it is the only way to do it. Dr.Lutz preferred a more progressive change toward low-carb, especially the older one. His reason had more to do with auto-immune and inflammation which tend to be worse at the beginning of the switch.

    To make it short, eat more fat, much, much more fat and the best fats are animal fats, bacon grease, duck and goose fat, lard, tallow, butter, heavy cream. In liquid oils, avoid poly-unsatured ones, they are outright dangerous, use olive oil for salads.
    Full-fat cheese, high-cocoa chocolates, coconut are good sources of fats.

  39. Mike S.

    @Marianne – You may want to look into the specific carbohydrate diet as well as the GAPS diet. The books are “Breaking the Vicious Cycle” and “The Gut and Psychology Syndrome”. There’s also a lot of info about these diets on the web. Both books explain why it’s not just the wheat responsible for digestive problems.

  40. Mike S.

    @Marianne – You may want to look into the specific carbohydrate diet as well as the GAPS diet. The books are “Breaking the Vicious Cycle” and “The Gut and Psychology Syndrome”. There’s also a lot of info about these diets on the web. Both books explain why it’s not just the wheat responsible for digestive problems.

  41. Walking Tall

    I cannot list all the symptoms I have had, that are leaving me, like the weight I am losing–and the inches of my belly.

    All in this book–a gift from God, except the Author’s evolution stance.

    This book has been an answer to prayer, as I had no idea why and what was happening to me! Now, as of 1 Mar. 2012, I have my life back! Why? That is the day I dropped Human Pesiticide–Genetic Modified Wheat!

    Thank God for this site–and for giving me the freedom to comment.

    Dr. Davis had done the world a favor by writing that book.

  42. Walking Tall

    I cannot list all the symptoms I have had, that are leaving me, like the weight I am losing–and the inches of my belly.

    All in this book–a gift from God, except the Author’s evolution stance.

    This book has been an answer to prayer, as I had no idea why and what was happening to me! Now, as of 1 Mar. 2012, I have my life back! Why? That is the day I dropped Human Pesiticide–Genetic Modified Wheat!

    Thank God for this site–and for giving me the freedom to comment.

    Dr. Davis had done the world a favor by writing that book.

  43. Cori Thompson

    I am almost in tears at both the freedom people have found from eating a wheat-free diet and at the thought of doing it myself. I am a carb-addict to the core. I don’t remember a time when any bread product didn’t soothe my soul. I have been uncomfotable with this knowledge about myself, but not enough to do much about it. Now that I have some information and an opportunity to to know more by reading the book, I’m thinking about how I’m responsible for the health of my children and how my daughter suffers terribly with eczema. She scratches her skin raw daily. She’s only 4 and she has scars all over her arms and legs, which are still covered in new, bright-red patches. We’ve tried multiple steroids and natural remedies which have little effect on her symptoms. I have read, from a questionable source, that a gluten-free diet is an affective “cure” for eczema, but there was no evidence of why and/or how. Is “gluten-free” the same as “wheat-free” and is this kind of dietary change relevant to eczema?

    Gluten is a protein found in many foods, including most grains. Gluten-free is therefore far more restrictive than wheat-free. The gluten in today’s wheat has been altered for better cooking properties, but the altered gluten appears to be causing a lot of problems.

    However, there’s more than just gluten in wheat that can cause health issues, as Dr. Davis explained in the book. The lectins can cause problems as well.

    I’d urge you to try a grain-free diet (with the possible exception of rice if you want more carbs in her diet) with your daughter and see what happens. If her condition clears up, you have an answer. If it doesn’t, all she missed were some grains that she doesn’t need.

  44. Cori Thompson

    I am almost in tears at both the freedom people have found from eating a wheat-free diet and at the thought of doing it myself. I am a carb-addict to the core. I don’t remember a time when any bread product didn’t soothe my soul. I have been uncomfotable with this knowledge about myself, but not enough to do much about it. Now that I have some information and an opportunity to to know more by reading the book, I’m thinking about how I’m responsible for the health of my children and how my daughter suffers terribly with eczema. She scratches her skin raw daily. She’s only 4 and she has scars all over her arms and legs, which are still covered in new, bright-red patches. We’ve tried multiple steroids and natural remedies which have little effect on her symptoms. I have read, from a questionable source, that a gluten-free diet is an affective “cure” for eczema, but there was no evidence of why and/or how. Is “gluten-free” the same as “wheat-free” and is this kind of dietary change relevant to eczema?

    Gluten is a protein found in many foods, including most grains. Gluten-free is therefore far more restrictive than wheat-free. The gluten in today’s wheat has been altered for better cooking properties, but the altered gluten appears to be causing a lot of problems.

    However, there’s more than just gluten in wheat that can cause health issues, as Dr. Davis explained in the book. The lectins can cause problems as well.

    I’d urge you to try a grain-free diet (with the possible exception of rice if you want more carbs in her diet) with your daughter and see what happens. If her condition clears up, you have an answer. If it doesn’t, all she missed were some grains that she doesn’t need.

  45. george luchuk

    I read the book ” Wheat Belly ” and was totally convinced that the good doctor was on to something. In just six weeks I’m down two notches on my belt and all my clothes that had become too tight are fitting me again. Whoopee ! It is absolutely wonderful that by simply eliminating wheat and otherwise eating most other things other than sugar stuff etc., one can easily get control of their weight at almost zero additional food expense. I’m convinced that I will in short order get back to the weight I was at 20 — around190 pounds. I’m now 71 — 6’3″ and was shocked to discover two months ago that I weighed 250 pounds. The real job now is to educate the public at large and that will no doubt be a daunting task but it can and must be done.

  46. george luchuk

    I read the book ” Wheat Belly ” and was totally convinced that the good doctor was on to something. In just six weeks I’m down two notches on my belt and all my clothes that had become too tight are fitting me again. Whoopee ! It is absolutely wonderful that by simply eliminating wheat and otherwise eating most other things other than sugar stuff etc., one can easily get control of their weight at almost zero additional food expense. I’m convinced that I will in short order get back to the weight I was at 20 — around190 pounds. I’m now 71 — 6’3″ and was shocked to discover two months ago that I weighed 250 pounds. The real job now is to educate the public at large and that will no doubt be a daunting task but it can and must be done.

  47. Ron Phillips

    I’m a sourdough guy. Pancakes, waffles, dinner rolls, bread, etc . . . Well, spelt is available and seems to feed sourdough. Do I sense an experiment coming up? I hope I don’t ruin the waffle irons!

  48. Ron Phillips

    I’m a sourdough guy. Pancakes, waffles, dinner rolls, bread, etc . . . Well, spelt is available and seems to feed sourdough. Do I sense an experiment coming up? I hope I don’t ruin the waffle irons!

  49. Oregontweety

    I have been a hard core wheat advocate my whole life. I ground my own, made homemade bread and other baked goods, ate it steamed whole for breakfast, the list goes on. As a Mormon, wheat nearly approaches the status of Manna. But I now realize that the wheat I’ve been counseled to eat my entire life has been poisoning me. I am not defective, the modern wheat is. My chiropractor counseled me to go gluten free two years ago. I was diligent, but what nobody told me was to not eat all of those gluten free substitutes. After a few months, I had not lost a pound, then became sick and then developed fructose malabsorption along with a raging ulcer. I decided that being GF was what caused my health decline and went back to eating what the heck I wanted. I recently started with a new trainer who recommended going GF. I told him my horror story of the previous attempt. He recommended Wheat Belly. I have been eating a more paleo type diet for a few weeks now, without all of the substitutes. While I have not lost very many pounds, I have dropped a clothing size, feel like a human being, and have been able to stop taking my prescription strength prevacid and am slowly regaining my ability to digest fructose (as in fresh fruit, NOT agave or anything like that). I am never hungry, no more blood sugar swings or wild cravings. I have battled with emotional eating my whole life. Now that I’ve cut the “wheat” drug, I no longer need a fix, other than some daily dark chocolate :o).

    Don’t worry about the pounds. If your clothes are looser, you’re probably changing your body composition.

  50. Oregontweety

    I have been a hard core wheat advocate my whole life. I ground my own, made homemade bread and other baked goods, ate it steamed whole for breakfast, the list goes on. As a Mormon, wheat nearly approaches the status of Manna. But I now realize that the wheat I’ve been counseled to eat my entire life has been poisoning me. I am not defective, the modern wheat is. My chiropractor counseled me to go gluten free two years ago. I was diligent, but what nobody told me was to not eat all of those gluten free substitutes. After a few months, I had not lost a pound, then became sick and then developed fructose malabsorption along with a raging ulcer. I decided that being GF was what caused my health decline and went back to eating what the heck I wanted. I recently started with a new trainer who recommended going GF. I told him my horror story of the previous attempt. He recommended Wheat Belly. I have been eating a more paleo type diet for a few weeks now, without all of the substitutes. While I have not lost very many pounds, I have dropped a clothing size, feel like a human being, and have been able to stop taking my prescription strength prevacid and am slowly regaining my ability to digest fructose (as in fresh fruit, NOT agave or anything like that). I am never hungry, no more blood sugar swings or wild cravings. I have battled with emotional eating my whole life. Now that I’ve cut the “wheat” drug, I no longer need a fix, other than some daily dark chocolate :o).

    Don’t worry about the pounds. If your clothes are looser, you’re probably changing your body composition.

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