Brilliant Ideas For Curing Obesity

Some interesting theories on Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It have been popping in the news lately – and no, I’m not talking about the book by Gary Taubes.  I’m talking about ideas proposed by … uh … well, let’s call them somewhat less-brilliant researchers.

A doctor in St. Louis, for example, has decided that the main cause of the obesity epidemic is pregnancy:

National experts have suggested that if a woman is obese, she should gain far less weight when pregnant than previously thought:  just 11 to 20 pounds.  But one local doctor says even that is far too much. Dr. Raul Artal, chairman of the obstetrics and gynecology department at St. Louis University School of Medicine, says an obese woman who gets knocked up shouldn’t gain so much as an ounce — and then adds that pregnancy, not an unhealthy affection for fast food and the La-Z-Boy, is “the main contributor to the obesity epidemic in this country.”

I believe the doctor is onto something.  While researching Fat Head, I was surprised to learn that back in the days when obesity was rare, the vast majority of women never became pregnant.  All the propagating of the species was accomplished by a small minority of women who then gave their babies to women who preferred to remain thin.  Pretty much every family was made up of kids who were adopted — which is how Puritans and the upper-class British managed to raise large numbers of children without ever engaging in sex.  It was also the reason that every individual bore a striking resemblance to at least 200 other individuals in their geographic area.  Sure, the gene pool was a little shallow, but people were thin and that’s what mattered.

Unfortunately, all that began to change in the late 1960s with the arrival of loose morals — which became even looser after disco music was invented in the 1970s.  Women who wanted to raise children began insisting on having their own babies, and the obesity epidemic was born.  (By pure coincidence, this was also around the time the McGovern committee told everyone to eat more grains and other carbohydrates.)

I know what you’re probably thinking:  if Dr. Artal is correct that pregnancy is the primary cause of obesity, why are so many men obese? All I can tell you is that both times my wife became pregnant, I got fatter.  I can’t explain the biological mechanism, but I expect science to provide an answer eventually.

Since women apparently plan to keep producing their own babies, the real question is what to do about all the obesity their pregnancies are causing.  A professor of bioethics has come up with a solution that was recently praised by a columnist for the Boston Globe:  we need to shame fat people into better eating habits:

“Hey, fatty! Pull that doughnut out of your pie hole! You look like a pig, and you are costing me, and every other taxpayer, billions of dollars in unnecessary health care each year!’’

How do you like my new public service ad campaign, designed to stigmatize the overweight and the obese in the same way smokers have been made to feel the knout of social opprobrium for the past quarter-century?

I got the idea when I heard Professor Daniel Callahan, the retired cofounder of the Hastings Center, a bioethics research institution, speak on a radio program about two weeks ago. Why aren’t overeaters subject to the same stigmatization as smokers?, he mused. Why not indeed?

Callahan makes a persuasive case: 67 percent of Americans are overweight, he writes. “Obesity is a leading cause of diabetes, heart disease, and kidney failure. There are some prima facie reasons for thinking about stigmatization as one more arrow in the quiver of possible solutions.

“It can hardly be said that obesity is beyond individual control,’’ he continues. “So, why not stigmatize [the obese], bringing social pressure to bear?’’

Boy, if only someone with Professor Callahan’s deep understanding of what causes body-fat accumulation had been around when I was becoming an obese adolescent, I would have remained lean.  When we had to play shirts vs. skins in gym-class basketball games, it just never occurred to me to feel ashamed of my fat belly, love handles and boy-boobs.  If the naturally-skinny boys in my class had cared more about me (and been armed with Professor Callahan’s insights), they could have helped me out by calling me names like Lard-Ass, Fat Boy, Pudge, Booby Boy, Porky Pig, or Butter Butt.  I now realize that with their kind-hearted acceptance of me (and the one other fat kid in class), they were inadvertently acting as enablers.

So to all you obese people out there who are happy with your bodies, it’s time to look yourself in the mirror and feel ashamed!  Don’t wait for Professor Callahan’s ideas to catch fire and inspire some do-gooders to shame you … be pro-active and take responsibility for shaming yourself.

I know what you’re probably thinking:  But what about all the fat babies being born these days?  Babies aren’t capable of shaming themselves … if they were, they’d  be more conscientious about where and when they fill their diapers.

Never fear.  The British government has an answer for the wee tykes:  get them to exercise more!

The British government says children under five — including those who can’t walk yet — should exercise every day. The new guidelines were issued Monday, partly to fight the obesity epidemic.

In them, the department of health says children under five who can walk should be physically active for at least three hours a day. For babies who can’t walk yet, the government says physical activity should be encouraged from birth, including infants playing on their stomach and swimming sessions with their parents.

I have to admit, I don’t know whether this advice will prove to be effective, since my only experience is with two little girls who are active even when I’d like to them slow down for a change.  Last night, for example, they grew bored with watching Man vs. Wild from a seated position and decided to construct a bridge between the sofa and an ottoman, using several household items as building materials.  When the bridge fell down under the older daughter’s weight, I thought they’d give up … but nope, they just built a new one.  When that one fell down, they changed designs and built yet another one.  When that fell down, they built another one.  I was expecting them to start whistling the theme from The Bridge on the River Kwai any minute.

But if the British government wants the “get your baby to exercise” advice to be truly effective, I’d suggest they combine it with Professor Callahan’s insights and shame babies into working out.  Then you’d have a sure-fire cure for childhood obesity.

“Come on, Junior!  Wiggle those arms!  One-two-three-four … you’re quitting at four reps?  What are you, some kind of baby?”

“Well, actually—“

“No wonder you’re so fat.  Look at you, you little butterball!  You’ve got thighs like canned hams!”

“That’s baby fat, coach!”

“Yeah, sure it is.  Listen, kid:  you’re fat because your mother listened to some old Bee Gees songs from the 1970s and then went out and got herself pregnant, so now everybody’s fat.  Well, not here in jolly old England, Butterball!  Not on my watch.  Now drop and give me twenty.”

“Twenty what?”

“Pushups!”

“WAAAAHHH!”

“Be quiet!  Hey, what did you just put in your mouth?”

“My thumb.”

“Is there any fat in that thing?”

“I’m a baby.  I’m fat all over.”

“Then take it out of your mouth, now!”

“WAAAAHHH!”

Yup, with all these brilliant new ideas being proposed, obesity will soon be nothing more than a bad memory – like disco.


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202 thoughts on “Brilliant Ideas For Curing Obesity

  1. LaurieLM

    The cause of obesity and diabetes is the shift towards more and more vegetarian foods. It’s not what vegetarians can’t eat (meat), it’s what they and the rest of us are encouraged to eat more of that’s the problem- more plants and plant’s seeds ——GRAINS.
    Sci-Fi, horror epiphany that I hope makes you laugh.

    Hi, I hope this makes you chuckle, sigh, become aggravated- but mostly laugh.

    I think the real conspiracy is that plants, mostly cereal grains, have taken over our brains, language and eating habits. ‘Whole Foods’ sells frankenstein ‘Fakin’ Bacon”, ‘Not Dogs’, raw sugar, and breads- just to mention a few things. None of these items is whole, natural human fare, nor healthy for anyone to eat by any wild stretch of the imagination, and bread is addicting (opioid compounds that can cross first the gut and then the BBB in the wheat protein). I think the unconscious, unplanned-by-the-plants ‘conspiracy’ is that they have colluded to make us fight wars over oil and land and slaves to finance and power the desertification of ever more aerable land to sustain their propagation- at our considerable expense.

    I think there is also a battle between plants. Cereal grains have succeeded in making tobacco look like the only baddie. Now everyone knows tobacco can kill and the focus is off of wheat. Wheat maims, makes insane, fattens, makes our guts leaky and when we eat them, they REPLACE brain and heart and kidney building, immune system enhancing developing and maintaining healthy animal fat cholesterol and protein in the diet!

    And then there’s this, with the calls to have 8 year olds start taking Lipitor and toddlers start exercising, the takeover is nearly complete by grains to get the spotlight off of them and make it seem that fat, cholesterol and animal flesh is what CAUSES modern diseases. Maybe sugar is a known problem and any mom in America worth her salt would never knowingly feed a 6-month-old any overt sugar, but nearly universally, good moms all over the country feed their precious babes (with growing brains clamoring for animal FAT)- Cheerios, macaroni, spaghetti, organic breads, peanut butter and jelly, other breakfast cereals, pancakes. ‘Healthywholegrains’ are basically carbohydrate (CARBOHYDRATe by any other name is SUGAR) PLUS nefarious damaging plant proteins (see above). At least sugar doesn’t bring along the plant proteins with it to wreck even more havoc and addict.

    We are admonished to eat more plants every day and fewer and fewer animal products. There is no mom I know who would let her six month old smoke. But millions of moms have no idea what they are doing to their cherubs by putting Cheerios on their highchair trays. Laurie

    I agree with something Lierre Keith wrote in “The Vegetarian Myth”: we think we domesticated grains, but in reality they appear to have domesticated humans. We now work for them.

  2. Pat

    Hi Tom
    I thought you would like this – On Saturday the Ottawa Citizen (Ontario, Canada) had a three page spread following a Tamworth pig from Pickle Patch Farm (http://www.savourottawa.ca/profiles_en/pickle_patch.php) to pork tacos at Beckta Dining & Wine. Great article, lots of pictures, here’s to pigs!
    I couldn’t get the article online, unfortunately. But you can see where the pig grew up (and yes that is savour, not savor, in the URL, we follow British spelling most of the time).

    I like “savour.” It feels more luxurious with that extra letter in it.

  3. joe

    I’m vegetarian myself, but i can’t stand fundamentalists . I’ve long stopped trolling meat eaters and i would want to be treated nicely by meat eaters and vegans alike. I think the fact that you need to troll has something to do with being unsure about your way of life. And this is something i do not want to project, something i do not HAVE to project!

    Those who are insecure about their beliefs are the most likely to become zealots who feel a need to convert everyone else. Eric Hoffer wrote an entire (and wonderful) book titled “The True Believer” about that personality type.

  4. Alexandra

    @loraine “For some reason, I’ve never seen a post on this blog about how much a low carb, high fat diet can mess with your bowels! Being a vegan has never felt so wonderful.”

    I would say that it is simply not an issue, I read many LCHF, paleo, primal blogs as well as books on the subject and I have never seen this mentioned.. quite the opposite, many that have made the change to this healthy way of eating marvel at how their GI problems went away. Let’s not forget how much this way of eating improves weight control, diabetes control, celiac, colitis, PCOS, metabolic syndrome along with many problems that one may not associate with diet: Joint pain, acne, confusion, fatigue, depression…it’s a LONG list.

  5. Lizzy

    @Loraine
    You appear to have overlooked the comment to YOU from Katy.

    My personal experience of eating low carb/higher fat (more importantly – no grains) is that my awful indigestion/flatulence issues went away along with bouts of diarrhea/constipation. My lactose intolerance went away completely!

    Do you seriously think that all the low carbers out there would continue with their diet if it caused “oily anal leakage”? Seriously?

  6. Mark. Gooley

    I’ve had steatorrhea a few times long ago, but never when on a low-carb diet. It’s true that my stools tend to float now, for whatever reason, but that horrible oily orange stuff that showed up when I had steatorrhea is absent. I just don’t buy the claims, barring the occasional individual who has some real problems digesting and absorbing dietary fats.

  7. Auntie M

    @Loraine–go back and read Katy’s comment.

    High carb always made me run to the bathroom within 30 minutes of eating. Low carb has been much better for me, digestion-wise. I have IBS-like symptoms when eating lots of carbs and gluten, but they strangely disappear when I’m low-carbing.

    Sorry. I’ll stop feeding the trolls. It just causes a trolling frenzy.

    I can’t figure it out, though….because I’m overweight and pregnant, and I initially gained 10 pounds, but have now managed to lose most of them. I eat 3 substantial (but moderate carb) meals a day, and some snacks, and I’m on bedrest, so I don’t DO anything. I think I’m losing muscle mass from all the laying down, but that makes me…what….a Black Swan? A “Bedrest Paradox”? Eh, I know I’m feeding him/her good non-carbage, so I’m not too worried.

    Apparently my husband has been pregnant for several years, but hasn’t had the baby yet. Oh, and my father, too. I didn’t realize pregnancy-related obesity was so prevalent among males!

    I had surgery to ensure that my wife wouldn’t become pregnant again and cause me to gain more weight.

  8. Alexandra

    @loraine Do your homework, a very quick google search shows that the causes of Steatorrhea is related to pancreatitis, fatty liver liver disease, celiac disease, etc. All of which are improved/ cured by a low carb/ high fat diet.. Sounds like you are MUCH more at risk for this than I am.

  9. Underground

    “a high fat, low carb diet will indeed cause a multitude of GI issues, this one being one of the worst:”

    No one says “Hey, I better not eat a steak, I don’t want to be gassy.” They avoid, gasp, things like beans that happen to be high in carbohydrates. Chick peas do it to me.

    Your unfounded assertion does not hold water. Quite the opposite actually.

  10. LaurieLM

    The cause of obesity and diabetes is the shift towards more and more vegetarian foods. It’s not what vegetarians can’t eat (meat), it’s what they and the rest of us are encouraged to eat more of that’s the problem- more plants and plant’s seeds ——GRAINS.
    Sci-Fi, horror epiphany that I hope makes you laugh.

    Hi, I hope this makes you chuckle, sigh, become aggravated- but mostly laugh.

    I think the real conspiracy is that plants, mostly cereal grains, have taken over our brains, language and eating habits. ‘Whole Foods’ sells frankenstein ‘Fakin’ Bacon”, ‘Not Dogs’, raw sugar, and breads- just to mention a few things. None of these items is whole, natural human fare, nor healthy for anyone to eat by any wild stretch of the imagination, and bread is addicting (opioid compounds that can cross first the gut and then the BBB in the wheat protein). I think the unconscious, unplanned-by-the-plants ‘conspiracy’ is that they have colluded to make us fight wars over oil and land and slaves to finance and power the desertification of ever more aerable land to sustain their propagation- at our considerable expense.

    I think there is also a battle between plants. Cereal grains have succeeded in making tobacco look like the only baddie. Now everyone knows tobacco can kill and the focus is off of wheat. Wheat maims, makes insane, fattens, makes our guts leaky and when we eat them, they REPLACE brain and heart and kidney building, immune system enhancing developing and maintaining healthy animal fat cholesterol and protein in the diet!

    And then there’s this, with the calls to have 8 year olds start taking Lipitor and toddlers start exercising, the takeover is nearly complete by grains to get the spotlight off of them and make it seem that fat, cholesterol and animal flesh is what CAUSES modern diseases. Maybe sugar is a known problem and any mom in America worth her salt would never knowingly feed a 6-month-old any overt sugar, but nearly universally, good moms all over the country feed their precious babes (with growing brains clamoring for animal FAT)- Cheerios, macaroni, spaghetti, organic breads, peanut butter and jelly, other breakfast cereals, pancakes. ‘Healthywholegrains’ are basically carbohydrate (CARBOHYDRATe by any other name is SUGAR) PLUS nefarious damaging plant proteins (see above). At least sugar doesn’t bring along the plant proteins with it to wreck even more havoc and addict.

    We are admonished to eat more plants every day and fewer and fewer animal products. There is no mom I know who would let her six month old smoke. But millions of moms have no idea what they are doing to their cherubs by putting Cheerios on their highchair trays. Laurie

    I agree with something Lierre Keith wrote in “The Vegetarian Myth”: we think we domesticated grains, but in reality they appear to have domesticated humans. We now work for them.

  11. Sugar is Evil

    Hey Tom, I was the same way…I went vegan for 3 years and it was the most miserable time of my life. Besides having low energy all of the time, I developed several deficiencies as well as had bloody stools. I was wondering what types of digestive issues you had during your vegetarian phase? I’m not entirely sold on the ‘fiber is wonderful’ line that the grain gods keep pushing down our throats.

    I had gastric reflux at times, frequent belly aches, and colitis.

  12. Loraine

    OK, fair enough. It was probably some kid with too much time on his hands. That being said, it looks like you avoided the other part of my comment — a high fat, low carb diet will indeed cause a multitude of GI issues, this one being one of the worst:

    Steatorrhea is the presence of excess fat in feces. Stools may also float due to excess lipid, have an oily appearance and be especially foul-smelling. An oily anal leakage or some level of fecal incontinence may occur.

    ——————————————
    Since switching to a high-fat/low-carb diet, the digestive issues that bothered me throughout much of my adult life have disappeared. I’ve heard from dozens of people who had similar experiences, including the sound engineer for Fat Head, who was able to stop taking his daily dose of Prilosec after adopting a low-carb diet. So you’ll pardon me if I don’t find a reference to oily stools convincing.

  13. Robinowitz

    I know personally (or correspond with via blog conversations) so very many LCHF eaters and I’ve never heard of anyone complaining of digestive issues. In fact, it’s just the opposite–they can’t believe how great their digestion is in the absence of grains and sugars! As for anti-meat eaters: if not eating meat works for you then have at it. We all still can–at least for the time-being–eat as we please. 

    Exactly what happened to me. I used to always have my pepto-bismal handy. Now I can’t remember the last time I took a dose.

  14. Lizzy

    @Loraine
    You appear to have overlooked the comment to YOU from Katy.

    My personal experience of eating low carb/higher fat (more importantly – no grains) is that my awful indigestion/flatulence issues went away along with bouts of diarrhea/constipation. My lactose intolerance went away completely!

    Do you seriously think that all the low carbers out there would continue with their diet if it caused “oily anal leakage”? Seriously?

  15. Mark. Gooley

    I’ve had steatorrhea a few times long ago, but never when on a low-carb diet. It’s true that my stools tend to float now, for whatever reason, but that horrible oily orange stuff that showed up when I had steatorrhea is absent. I just don’t buy the claims, barring the occasional individual who has some real problems digesting and absorbing dietary fats.

  16. Kevin

    Why do people like JohnPatrick even come on the site and troll like that? It makes them look like a complete idiot and furthers your point.

    By the way, I would consider myself a Democrat(though I strongly disagree with them on the My Plate thing, but it’s not like Republicans are offering an alternative) and diet shouldn’t be a political issue. Vegans are making it one because they know they’re diet doesn’t work and it’s their only way to shove it down peoples’ throats.

    I have no idea what brings them here. The troll with the obsession about smelly butts trolls this blog and my brother’s, offering the same level of wit on both. You’d think if he disagrees with us so passionately, he’d just go away … same reason I don’t bother watch Bill Maher.

  17. Auntie M

    @Loraine–go back and read Katy’s comment.

    High carb always made me run to the bathroom within 30 minutes of eating. Low carb has been much better for me, digestion-wise. I have IBS-like symptoms when eating lots of carbs and gluten, but they strangely disappear when I’m low-carbing.

    Sorry. I’ll stop feeding the trolls. It just causes a trolling frenzy.

    I can’t figure it out, though….because I’m overweight and pregnant, and I initially gained 10 pounds, but have now managed to lose most of them. I eat 3 substantial (but moderate carb) meals a day, and some snacks, and I’m on bedrest, so I don’t DO anything. I think I’m losing muscle mass from all the laying down, but that makes me…what….a Black Swan? A “Bedrest Paradox”? Eh, I know I’m feeding him/her good non-carbage, so I’m not too worried.

    Apparently my husband has been pregnant for several years, but hasn’t had the baby yet. Oh, and my father, too. I didn’t realize pregnancy-related obesity was so prevalent among males!

    I had surgery to ensure that my wife wouldn’t become pregnant again and cause me to gain more weight.

  18. Katy

    Pssst, Loraine, maybe you should read ALL the comments before repeating yourself. Steatorrhea isn’t caused from eating fat. You are describing symptoms caused by other conditions.

  19. Quinlan

    More shame = more stress = more cortisol = insulin resistance, weaker immune systems, osteoporosis, hypertension, increased visceral fat, miscarriage, infertility, depression, eating disorders, people avoiding doctors untill health problems are worse and therefore more expensive to treat, weight GAIN.

    So more shame leads to more obesity and poor health which ultimately leads to higher health care costs!

    This guy is a genuis… It’s just sad that so many so called objective researchers have mentalities similar to a schoolyard bully, maybe they never grew up?

    They’re the grown-up versions of the kids who lived on pop-parts, french fries and sodas without ever gaining an ounce, but thought those of who were fat were just undisciplined.

  20. Alexandra

    @loraine Do your homework, a very quick google search shows that the causes of Steatorrhea is related to pancreatitis, fatty liver liver disease, celiac disease, etc. All of which are improved/ cured by a low carb/ high fat diet.. Sounds like you are MUCH more at risk for this than I am.

  21. Underground

    “a high fat, low carb diet will indeed cause a multitude of GI issues, this one being one of the worst:”

    No one says “Hey, I better not eat a steak, I don’t want to be gassy.” They avoid, gasp, things like beans that happen to be high in carbohydrates. Chick peas do it to me.

    Your unfounded assertion does not hold water. Quite the opposite actually.

  22. Sugar is Evil

    Hey Tom, I was the same way…I went vegan for 3 years and it was the most miserable time of my life. Besides having low energy all of the time, I developed several deficiencies as well as had bloody stools. I was wondering what types of digestive issues you had during your vegetarian phase? I’m not entirely sold on the ‘fiber is wonderful’ line that the grain gods keep pushing down our throats.

    I had gastric reflux at times, frequent belly aches, and colitis.

  23. Robinowitz

    I know personally (or correspond with via blog conversations) so very many LCHF eaters and I’ve never heard of anyone complaining of digestive issues. In fact, it’s just the opposite–they can’t believe how great their digestion is in the absence of grains and sugars! As for anti-meat eaters: if not eating meat works for you then have at it. We all still can–at least for the time-being–eat as we please. 

    Exactly what happened to me. I used to always have my pepto-bismal handy. Now I can’t remember the last time I took a dose.

  24. Kevin

    Why do people like JohnPatrick even come on the site and troll like that? It makes them look like a complete idiot and furthers your point.

    By the way, I would consider myself a Democrat(though I strongly disagree with them on the My Plate thing, but it’s not like Republicans are offering an alternative) and diet shouldn’t be a political issue. Vegans are making it one because they know they’re diet doesn’t work and it’s their only way to shove it down peoples’ throats.

    I have no idea what brings them here. The troll with the obsession about smelly butts trolls this blog and my brother’s, offering the same level of wit on both. You’d think if he disagrees with us so passionately, he’d just go away … same reason I don’t bother watch Bill Maher.

  25. Kevin

    “I have no idea what brings them here. The troll with the obsession about smelly butts trolls this blog and my brother’s, offering the same level of wit on both”

    I feel sorry for you for having to deal with them. He’s trolling your brother’s website too? Seriously?

    Yup, the same idiot shows up in both places to tell us how much he doesn’t like our blogs. Odd way of handling his displeasure. If I don’t like a blog, I go away and never come back.

  26. Katy

    Pssst, Loraine, maybe you should read ALL the comments before repeating yourself. Steatorrhea isn’t caused from eating fat. You are describing symptoms caused by other conditions.

  27. Quinlan

    More shame = more stress = more cortisol = insulin resistance, weaker immune systems, osteoporosis, hypertension, increased visceral fat, miscarriage, infertility, depression, eating disorders, people avoiding doctors untill health problems are worse and therefore more expensive to treat, weight GAIN.

    So more shame leads to more obesity and poor health which ultimately leads to higher health care costs!

    This guy is a genuis… It’s just sad that so many so called objective researchers have mentalities similar to a schoolyard bully, maybe they never grew up?

    They’re the grown-up versions of the kids who lived on pop-parts, french fries and sodas without ever gaining an ounce, but thought those of who were fat were just undisciplined.

  28. Kevin

    “I have no idea what brings them here. The troll with the obsession about smelly butts trolls this blog and my brother’s, offering the same level of wit on both”

    I feel sorry for you for having to deal with them. He’s trolling your brother’s website too? Seriously?

    Yup, the same idiot shows up in both places to tell us how much he doesn’t like our blogs. Odd way of handling his displeasure. If I don’t like a blog, I go away and never come back.

  29. Nowhereman

    It doesn’t help anything when we get craptastic articles about the Paleo Diet, like this one on Yahoo:

    http://shine.yahoo.com/event/green/paleo-diet-smart-eating-or-latest-fad-2514781/

    They quote so-called “experts” who spout off garbage like this:

    “People who eat diets high in whole grains, beans, and low-fat dairy tend to be healthier because these foods are nutrient-rich and there are mountains of research about the health benefits of diets that include, not exclude, these foods,”
    -Keith Ayoob, EDd, R

    Nutrient dense? Not half! Starchy and carbohydrate filled, that’s what they are! That means more sugar in your body, and more insulin resistance later, which in turn means… diabetes, cancer, or heart disease.

    Ayoob is an a-boob. Since when are gains more nutrient dense than meat?

  30. Nowhereman

    It doesn’t help anything when we get craptastic articles about the Paleo Diet, like this one on Yahoo:

    http://shine.yahoo.com/event/green/paleo-diet-smart-eating-or-latest-fad-2514781/

    They quote so-called “experts” who spout off garbage like this:

    “People who eat diets high in whole grains, beans, and low-fat dairy tend to be healthier because these foods are nutrient-rich and there are mountains of research about the health benefits of diets that include, not exclude, these foods,”
    -Keith Ayoob, EDd, R

    Nutrient dense? Not half! Starchy and carbohydrate filled, that’s what they are! That means more sugar in your body, and more insulin resistance later, which in turn means… diabetes, cancer, or heart disease.

    Ayoob is an a-boob. Since when are gains more nutrient dense than meat?

  31. Rhonda Cowsert

    Holy Crap! Based on the current size of my backside I must have given birth to an ENTIRE litter of children. Has anyone seen them? Because I seem to have misplaced them AND forgotten the entire birth and pregnancy experience. This memory lapse is probably directly related to the fact that my mother let me play as a child instead of slapping my chubby baby hiney onto the treadmill.

    Do you ever receive Christmas cards from people whose names you don’t recognize. That’s probably the kids.

  32. Dave, RN

    “Yesterday there was an article in the major news blogs that said that eating with a BIGGER FORK could help with weight loss”.

    Yup. A 35lb fork. Just be sure to alternate hands.

    Sure, you get tired enough, you stop eating.

  33. The Older Brother

    “My brother (like me) is a libertarian, not a Republican. My brother also (like me) was more intelligent at age five than you’ll ever be.”

    Well, thanks, but it was probably more like six for me.

    I slacked off a lot when I was four.

    Cheers!

  34. Rhonda Cowsert

    Holy Crap! Based on the current size of my backside I must have given birth to an ENTIRE litter of children. Has anyone seen them? Because I seem to have misplaced them AND forgotten the entire birth and pregnancy experience. This memory lapse is probably directly related to the fact that my mother let me play as a child instead of slapping my chubby baby hiney onto the treadmill.

    Do you ever receive Christmas cards from people whose names you don’t recognize. That’s probably the kids.

  35. Dave, RN

    “Yesterday there was an article in the major news blogs that said that eating with a BIGGER FORK could help with weight loss”.

    Yup. A 35lb fork. Just be sure to alternate hands.

    Sure, you get tired enough, you stop eating.

  36. Tony Dickson

    Peggy C, I love that website, everything there makes so much sense. It really gives positive reinforcement to my efforts at eating right

  37. The Older Brother

    “My brother (like me) is a libertarian, not a Republican. My brother also (like me) was more intelligent at age five than you’ll ever be.”

    Well, thanks, but it was probably more like six for me.

    I slacked off a lot when I was four.

    Cheers!

  38. Tony Dickson

    Peggy C, I love that website, everything there makes so much sense. It really gives positive reinforcement to my efforts at eating right

  39. Goober

    Interesting thread hijack regarding poop and farts! Where do you find these people Tom?

    Unfortunately, they find me.

  40. Nowhereman

    “Ayoob is an a-boob. Since when are gains more nutrient dense than meat?”

    Tell me about it. Then just a few days later we get an article that mostly gets it right:

    http://health.yahoo.net/experts/eatthis/20-habits-that-make-you-fat

    Fat doesn’t make you fat? Well isn’t that great! But with contradictory mainstream articles like this, it’s no wonder everyone is so damn confused about what is or is not good for them. Sheesh…

    Especially confusing since this advice is coming from the “Eat This Not That” guy, whose previous writings warn people away from fats.

  41. Alison

    Does Dr. Raul Artal have an actual medical license?? How can a woman, obese or not, not gain a single ounce during pregnancy when they are in essence creating another living being who happens to weigh anywhere between 7-9 pounds when born? Either I’m not understanding something or his “hypothesis” is complete quackery!

    I vote for the latter.

  42. Goober

    Interesting thread hijack regarding poop and farts! Where do you find these people Tom?

    Unfortunately, they find me.

  43. Nowhereman

    “Ayoob is an a-boob. Since when are gains more nutrient dense than meat?”

    Tell me about it. Then just a few days later we get an article that mostly gets it right:

    http://health.yahoo.net/experts/eatthis/20-habits-that-make-you-fat

    Fat doesn’t make you fat? Well isn’t that great! But with contradictory mainstream articles like this, it’s no wonder everyone is so damn confused about what is or is not good for them. Sheesh…

    Especially confusing since this advice is coming from the “Eat This Not That” guy, whose previous writings warn people away from fats.

  44. Alison

    Does Dr. Raul Artal have an actual medical license?? How can a woman, obese or not, not gain a single ounce during pregnancy when they are in essence creating another living being who happens to weigh anywhere between 7-9 pounds when born? Either I’m not understanding something or his “hypothesis” is complete quackery!

    I vote for the latter.

  45. Firebird

    I went for a hair cut yesterday and the girl who cuts my hair was telling me how her husband, a retired mailman, has been putting on weight since he retired (no more route to walk). She also raises her grand son, who is starting to put on fat. I tried to impress upon her the need to reduce carbs, especially potatoes and bread, two things her husband likes. She suggested that she should switch to wheat from white. She couldn’t fathom that the end result is the same, that it turns to glucose.

    At the same time, her grandson loves bacon, and lots of it, six pieces at a sitting. He also drinks a lot of whole milk. Her doctor told her to cut out the bacon and switch to skim. I told her he needed the bacon and milk, and that he eats so much of it because his body is craving it. Regarding bacon, most likely the fat needed to grow, and the salt because he is probably deficient and needs replenishment.

    I encouraged her to watch Fat Head and get the carbs down to under 100 gms/day. We’ll see what happens, but I do not think I got through to her.

    I’m afraid it’s tough to convince some people that so many “experts” are wrong.

  46. Firebird

    I went for a hair cut yesterday and the girl who cuts my hair was telling me how her husband, a retired mailman, has been putting on weight since he retired (no more route to walk). She also raises her grand son, who is starting to put on fat. I tried to impress upon her the need to reduce carbs, especially potatoes and bread, two things her husband likes. She suggested that she should switch to wheat from white. She couldn’t fathom that the end result is the same, that it turns to glucose.

    At the same time, her grandson loves bacon, and lots of it, six pieces at a sitting. He also drinks a lot of whole milk. Her doctor told her to cut out the bacon and switch to skim. I told her he needed the bacon and milk, and that he eats so much of it because his body is craving it. Regarding bacon, most likely the fat needed to grow, and the salt because he is probably deficient and needs replenishment.

    I encouraged her to watch Fat Head and get the carbs down to under 100 gms/day. We’ll see what happens, but I do not think I got through to her.

    I’m afraid it’s tough to convince some people that so many “experts” are wrong.

  47. Angi, Texas

    I know this is several days late, and I’m really far too exhausted to look this up, but many of you might be interested in this blast from the past.

    Apparently in the 70’s or thereabouts mothers were told to gain as little weight as possible while pregnant and there was a short epidemic of underweight, malnourished babies. That’s why for 20 years mothers were then encouraged to eat and GAIN weight.

    In studies conducted by the Institute of Medicine, testing the connection between weight gain and premature labor, the results were surprising: ninety percent of the studies showed a link between low rate pregnancy weight gain and premature labor, meaning if the women did not gain enough weight, she was at a higher risk to give birth prematurely.

    Fetal growth has also been connected to weight gain rates in pregnancies. Low maternal weight can cause low birth weight.

    Rates of weight gain should be monitored in prenatal visits. A Canadian study found that women who gained excessive weight in the first twenty weeks, would likely retain the weight after birth, making the task of getting back into shape much harder.

    So there it is, doctors are now telling women that sick babies are better than being fat.

    (The Older Brother is pinch-hitting for Tom while he’s at the Ancestral Health Symposium at UCLA)

    The Wife gave birth to our daughter and four sons in a span from 1975 to 1984. The “expert” consensus ranged from “gain 30” to “gain 0.” My theory, which I hold to this day, is that the whole debate is just a huge joke that oby-gyn’s — who were almost all men during most of that period — took turns perpetuating at their conventions.

    “Hey Fred, what are we gonna tell them they can gain during pregnancy this year?”

    “I dunno Ralph. What’d we go with last year — 29 pounds? I know, let’s tell ’em eighteen! Har! Har!”

    Maybe it didn’t really happen that way, but I can’t figure out why else a woman would listen to some guy in a lab coat instead of her own body.

    Cheers!

  48. Angi, Texas

    I know this is several days late, and I’m really far too exhausted to look this up, but many of you might be interested in this blast from the past.

    Apparently in the 70’s or thereabouts mothers were told to gain as little weight as possible while pregnant and there was a short epidemic of underweight, malnourished babies. That’s why for 20 years mothers were then encouraged to eat and GAIN weight.

    In studies conducted by the Institute of Medicine, testing the connection between weight gain and premature labor, the results were surprising: ninety percent of the studies showed a link between low rate pregnancy weight gain and premature labor, meaning if the women did not gain enough weight, she was at a higher risk to give birth prematurely.

    Fetal growth has also been connected to weight gain rates in pregnancies. Low maternal weight can cause low birth weight.

    Rates of weight gain should be monitored in prenatal visits. A Canadian study found that women who gained excessive weight in the first twenty weeks, would likely retain the weight after birth, making the task of getting back into shape much harder.

    So there it is, doctors are now telling women that sick babies are better than being fat.

    (The Older Brother is pinch-hitting for Tom while he’s at the Ancestral Health Symposium at UCLA)

    The Wife gave birth to our daughter and four sons in a span from 1975 to 1984. The “expert” consensus ranged from “gain 30” to “gain 0.” My theory, which I hold to this day, is that the whole debate is just a huge joke that oby-gyn’s — who were almost all men during most of that period — took turns perpetuating at their conventions.

    “Hey Fred, what are we gonna tell them they can gain during pregnancy this year?”

    “I dunno Ralph. What’d we go with last year — 29 pounds? I know, let’s tell ’em eighteen! Har! Har!”

    Maybe it didn’t really happen that way, but I can’t figure out why else a woman would listen to some guy in a lab coat instead of her own body.

    Cheers!

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