Hope Warshaw’s Pepsi Challenge

      181 Comments on Hope Warshaw’s Pepsi Challenge

In my last post, I commented on a reply from Hope Warshaw  — the diabetes educator (ahem, ahem) — to a reader of this blog in which she pooh-poohed his “experience of one” with using a low-carb diet to manage diabetes.

The same reader emailed me that he conducted an “experiment of one” in recent days to compare his blood sugar after drinking a 12-ounce Pepsi versus eating some of the foods Hope Warshaw recommends for diabetics.  Take a look:

Food Carbs BG before BG at 60 mins
12-ounce Pepsi 42 g 89 156
Oatmeal, milk 40 g 113 163
Whole wheat bread 48 g 93 141
Whole wheat toast, milk 36 g 103 173

Perhaps those numbers don’t look scary to you, but they do to me.  Here’s what Chris Kresser of The Healthy Skeptic wrote about post-meal glucose levels awhile back:

Even the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists is now recommending that post-meal blood sugars never be allowed to rise above 140 mg/dL. Unfortunately, less informed groups like the ADA haven’t caught up with the science.

The consequences of this are severe. Nerve damage occurs as blood sugar rises above 140 mg/dL. Prolonged exposure to blood sugars above 140 mg/dL causes irreversible beta cell loss (the beta cells produce insulin). 1 in 2 “pre-diabetics” get retinopathy, a serious diabetic complication. Cancer rates increase as post-meal blood sugars rise above 160 mg/dL.

Every one of the high-carb meals produced a glucose level above 140 in my reader’s one-man experiment.  The biggest spike (173 mg/dL) was produced by two pieces of whole wheat toast and a glass of milk – a normal breakfast for a lot of people.

With those results in mind, let’s look at the advice Hope Warshaw doled out to diabetics in a Q & A article for Health.com:

Q: Do I need to pay attention to the sugars on the nutrition facts label?

A: No. Pay attention to the total carbohydrates. The sugars content includes the amount of added and natural sugar in a serving. The amount of sugars are included within the total carbohydrate count, which is the key piece of information you need for planning meals and snacks.

Well, so far so good.  She’s telling diabetics to watch their carbs.  Perhaps I misjudged the woman.  Let’s skip ahead.

Q: Are nutrition recommendations different for people who have just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than they are for those who’ve had diabetes for years and take insulin injections?

A: No, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which are supported by the American Diabetes Association, are appropriate for pretty much everyone, including most people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: Eat more whole grains, low-fat and fat-free dairy foods, fruits, and vegetables; limit consumption of high sodium processed foods and saturated and trans fats; get more of your protein from seafood and poultry and nonmeat sources, like beans (legumes); and eat all sources of protein in portions no larger than three ounces cooked. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans also recommend getting 45% to 65% of your calories from carbohydrates (with less than 25% of your total carbohydrates from added sugar); 20% to 35% from fat; and 10% to 35% from protein.

Nope, turns out I judged her correctly after all.  We need to eat lots of carbohydrates because the USDA says so.  Never mind what happens to blood-sugar levels in living, breathing (for now) diabetics who consume the high-carb meals the USDA recommends.   Brilliant.  And can someone please explain to me why beans — which are full of carbohydrates — are better for diabetics than meats?

Q: I’ve heard there are healthy and unhealthy carbohydrates. What should I eat more of, and what do I need to limit?

A: Foods that contain carbohydrates are starches, grains, fruit, vegetables, and dairy foods. The healthiest sources of carbohydrates provide plenty of vitamins and minerals per calorie—they are nutrient-dense. Everyone should eat more fiber-rich carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and beans (legumes). You should try to eat at least three servings or half your servings of starches as whole grains each day. Less healthy carbohydrates like candy, sweetened beverages, and ice cream pack little nutritional punch but contain plenty of calories; keep them to a minimum.

Yes, grains are more nutrient dense than a Pepsi.  But as my reader discovered in his one-man experiment, they can jack up your blood sugar just as high or higher.

Q: Is it OK for people with prediabetes and diabetes to eat some sugar and sweets?

A: Yes. People with diabetes can enjoy sugary foods and sweets in moderation.

And then take a moderate shot of insulin.

However, the amount of sweets you eat should be balanced with your diabetes nutrition goals, such as weight loss, blood glucose, and blood lipid control.

Yes, balance your diet with your goals for blood glucose.  Then eat your grains.  Then watch your blood sugar shoot up.  Then take your drugs so you can meet your blood glucose goals.

Be aware that some desserts and sweets, for example ice cream and cheesecake, are also high in fat and the fat may be the unhealthy saturated type.

You know, for a woman who told the reader not to bother her anymore unless he could quote some controlled clinical studies, Ms. Warshaw doesn’t seem to apply the same intellectual rigor to her own advice.  Can she point to any long-term clinical studies that prove saturated fat is bad for us?  Has she simply ignored all the recent studies showing that low-carb/high-fat diets produce better lipid profiles than high-carb diets?

Q: How many carbohydrates should an adult man or woman who is trying to lose weight eat each day?

A: Aim to get roughly half of your calories from carbohydrates.

Yes, be sure to do that.  Then take insulin to bring your blood sugar back down.

Head.  Bang.  On.  Desk.

For example, a sedentary woman who wants to lose weight should limit her calories to 1,400 to 1,600 a day, so she should consume 700 to 800 calories from carbohydrates daily.

Bang.  On.  Desk.  Again.

Following is a sample meal plan that would meet this guideline, along with examples of serving sizes.

  • Seven starch servings (one serving is a slice of whole wheat bread, or half a medium baked potato)
  • Two servings of milk and yogurt (one serving is eight ounces of fat-free milk, 2/3 cup of fat-free yogurt)
  • Four servings of vegetables (one serving is one cup of salad or a half-cup of cauliflower or carrots)
  • Five ounces of meat (cooked)
  • Three servings of fruit (one serving is a cup of cantaloupe, 2 small tangerines, a small banana, or a small apple)
  • Six servings of fat (one serving is a teaspoon of olive oil, two tablespoons of avocado, four pecan halves, or a tablespoon of reduced-fat mayonnaise)

Seven servings of starch per day, eh?  Two servings of whole-grain starch plus a cup of milk pushed my reader’s blood sugar to over 170 mg/dL.  (Thank goodness he didn’t add a banana to that meal, as Ms. Warshaw would recommend.)  So for many diabetics out there, Ms. Warshaw’s diet is an invitation to walk around with jacked-up blood sugar all day.  But of course she’s a big fan of Metformin and other drugs that lower blood sugar, so it all balances out.

Q: Since I have diabetes, do I need to prepare my food separately from my family?

A: No. The foods that are healthy choices for you will also be healthy choices for your family members who don’t have diabetes.

That’s true.  Too bad Ms. Warshaw and the ADA have no flippin’ idea which choices are actually the healthy ones.


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181 thoughts on “Hope Warshaw’s Pepsi Challenge

  1. Sif

    My mothers husband was diagnosed with diabetes. His doctor told him that fat raises blood sugar. I have no idea where this idea comes from, but really – shouldn’t common sense tell you that it isn’t true?

    Say what?!! Man, he sounds worse than Morgan Spurlock’s doctor.

  2. Lori

    “Hope? Pshaw!” makes me think of Scotty Vanity, whose artistic output includes “Let’s Go to the Mall” and “I Like your Hair,” and the immortal lines, “I’m tardy, I’m sorry, but last night was outta sight, everybody partied.”

    I can’t be certain, but with regard to knowledge of endocrinology, the pitfalls of different types of studies, and what is generally a good program of diet for diabetes, he and Warshaw are probably interchangeable.

  3. Jennie

    She kind of makes me feel like a pig for not measuring out my avocado by the tablespoonful! A usual serving for me is a half. Unless it’s a small avocado. Then it’s a whole.

    Who the heck wants to eat a tablespoon of avocado?

  4. Angelyne

    No need to call her names. There is already a word that perfectly describes Hope Warsaw; she is a shill for big pharma.

  5. Katy

    ‘I read that a significant percentage of people with diabetes would rather take the drugs and eat what they like, even if they know a change in diet would help. Too bad.”

    People have been so frightened by the fat=heart disease lie. I know a woman who just lost her foot to diabetes, yet wouldn’t go LCHF because she was terrified of developing heart disease. She actually said that amputating her foot wouldn’t kill her, but a heart attack would.

    Good lord …

  6. Fred

    Hey, forget Hope Warshaw, ya’ll, and check out THE voice in modern LC nutrition: http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/.

    You mean THE voice who has a pathological obsession with Gary Taubes, shows up anywhere he’s mentioned on the internet to leave a few hundred nasty comments about him while insisting on remaining anonymous herself, trolls other blogs like a half-crazed stalker even though she already has her own blog to express her views, lifts posts from other bloggers and puts words in their mouths, then criticizes them for the words she put there? I’ll pass, thanks.

  7. Peggy Cihocki

    “a significant percentage of people with diabetes would rather take the drugs and eat what they like, even if they know a change in diet would help. Too bad.” Yeah. I know at least one like that. He won’t give up his cookies, bread, candy (ate a whole bag of Halloween candy at at sitting once) and his doctor said it’s fine as long as his glucose was in the proper range. Of course he needs lots of meds to keep it that way! I feel bad for his wife, who is my friend and probably going to be a widow before her time. But then, she takes a Statin, so who knows?

    It’s a shame.

  8. Mlalich

    Not surprised by this article and the results of the one man study. My father always told me to follow the money, and that was a small part of what made me love fat head so much. That and the good science, and logic.

  9. Leta

    Well, by carb free, I mean like 0-10 grams per day, which is mighty tough to adhere to. She does eat under 50 grams per day in regular life.

  10. Hunter

    Tom, I wasn’t saying you were irrational or uneducated, but the responses to this were. You’ve presented her statements and argued your point with strong validity. @Dana Carpender-I meant to state that fiber helps in the digestion process. your statement number one contradicts itself. You say it doesn’t help, but slows down to the absorption of glucose. Which, correct me if i’m wrong, but is something good that fiber helps to do during digestion. I didn’t want this to sound like i was attacking Tom’s input. I love you’re opinions on this website, but to argue her case with a “experiment of one” isn’t a very strong case. I do have one question about that research though. Was the man an insulin dependent diabetic? and did he balance his meals with proper insulin and exercise? And I also wasn’t defending her stance on avoiding sodium, but merely suggesting she said avoid meats with higher sodium content..not to avoid sodium.

    I don’t know if he’s a type 1 diabetic. I also don’t care. The point of his experiment was to compare glucose reactions to foods like wheat toast and oatmeal to a Pepsi. Most doctors would tell diabetics the wheat toast is just wonderful, but the Pepsi is too much sugar. His experience — mine too, although I’m not a diabetic — is that the bread can spike your blood sugar higher than the soda. If diabetes “experts” can’t bring themselves to admit what grains and other starches can do to a diabetic’s blood sugar, they deserve the criticism.

    Your other reply to Dana was deleted because of the name you used.

  11. Dana Carpender

    Hunter said
    And I believe “nutrient dense” refers to foods that contains nutrients essential to life. Fiber is tough to digest, but it helps the body digest other food products. She was saying to avoid meats due to their high sodium content, if you would read without a blind eye. And I believe someone else wondered why high-carb/low fat diets were recommended. Maybe for people who are obese with type 2, people who have high blood pressure or high choloesterol are affected by foods rich in fat.
    I’m not trying to take her side with everything cause she does seem flip-floppy and getting paid from the pockets of the pharmeceutical companies she endorses, but some of your responses to this are uneducated and irrational.

    1) Fiber doesn’t help you digest a damned thing. If anything, it slows the digestion and absorption of other foods. That’s good when those food are going to turn into glucose, but vitamins and minerals? Not so much.

    2) Since fiber is not a nutrient, it can only dilute actual nutrients, like protein, fat, vitamins, and minerals. You want a nutrient-dense food? Try liver.

    3) Recommending low fat/high carb diet for people who are obese is mistaken, because such a diet keeps insulin levels elevated, thus preventing fat from exiting fat cells.

    4) A low carbohydrate diet is superior to a low fat/high carb diet for reducing blood pressure. You’ve heard that old wheeze about “Oh, you only lose water on that diet?” It’s not true, but it is true that you lose a lot of excess water in the first week or so by normalizing sodium excretion. This drops blood pressure dramatically.

    5) Multiple clinical studies have demonstrated that low carb diets are superior to low fat diets for improving the balance of blood fats, especially by raising HDL and dropping triglycerides dramatically. Indeed, it is not even a tiny bit controversial that high triglycerides are carbohydrate-driven. OTOH, total cholesterol appears to be pretty meaningless.

    6) I’d do a little research before you call Tom uneducated and irrational.

  12. Katy

    ‘I read that a significant percentage of people with diabetes would rather take the drugs and eat what they like, even if they know a change in diet would help. Too bad.”

    People have been so frightened by the fat=heart disease lie. I know a woman who just lost her foot to diabetes, yet wouldn’t go LCHF because she was terrified of developing heart disease. She actually said that amputating her foot wouldn’t kill her, but a heart attack would.

    Good lord …

  13. Fred

    Hey, forget Hope Warshaw, ya’ll, and check out THE voice in modern LC nutrition: http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/.

    You mean THE voice who has a pathological obsession with Gary Taubes, shows up anywhere he’s mentioned on the internet to leave a few hundred nasty comments about him while insisting on remaining anonymous herself, trolls other blogs like a half-crazed stalker even though she already has her own blog to express her views, lifts posts from other bloggers and puts words in their mouths, then criticizes them for the words she put there? I’ll pass, thanks.

  14. Peggy Cihocki

    “a significant percentage of people with diabetes would rather take the drugs and eat what they like, even if they know a change in diet would help. Too bad.” Yeah. I know at least one like that. He won’t give up his cookies, bread, candy (ate a whole bag of Halloween candy at at sitting once) and his doctor said it’s fine as long as his glucose was in the proper range. Of course he needs lots of meds to keep it that way! I feel bad for his wife, who is my friend and probably going to be a widow before her time. But then, she takes a Statin, so who knows?

    It’s a shame.

  15. Leta

    Well, by carb free, I mean like 0-10 grams per day, which is mighty tough to adhere to. She does eat under 50 grams per day in regular life.

  16. Hunter

    Tom, I wasn’t saying you were irrational or uneducated, but the responses to this were. You’ve presented her statements and argued your point with strong validity. @Dana Carpender-I meant to state that fiber helps in the digestion process. your statement number one contradicts itself. You say it doesn’t help, but slows down to the absorption of glucose. Which, correct me if i’m wrong, but is something good that fiber helps to do during digestion. I didn’t want this to sound like i was attacking Tom’s input. I love you’re opinions on this website, but to argue her case with a “experiment of one” isn’t a very strong case. I do have one question about that research though. Was the man an insulin dependent diabetic? and did he balance his meals with proper insulin and exercise? And I also wasn’t defending her stance on avoiding sodium, but merely suggesting she said avoid meats with higher sodium content..not to avoid sodium.

    I don’t know if he’s a type 1 diabetic. I also don’t care. The point of his experiment was to compare glucose reactions to foods like wheat toast and oatmeal to a Pepsi. Most doctors would tell diabetics the wheat toast is just wonderful, but the Pepsi is too much sugar. His experience — mine too, although I’m not a diabetic — is that the bread can spike your blood sugar higher than the soda. If diabetes “experts” can’t bring themselves to admit what grains and other starches can do to a diabetic’s blood sugar, they deserve the criticism.

    Your other reply to Dana was deleted because of the name you used.

  17. Robinowitz

    Regarding Hunter’s comment: I don’t believe Hope was recommending limiting meat because it’s (supposedly) high in sodium. She recommends this because it’s higher in saturated fat, just like the full fat dairy she vilifies. I have personally never attempted to limit salt consumption in my life and always salt my foods and yet somehow have never had anything but perfect blood pressure, even on a LCHF diet in which I use abundant Celtic sea salt on meats, veggies, sauces, etc. I know this is just my own anecdotal experience, but I just think that there is so much misinformation being spread about the evils of salting foods that I just had to comment. From what I’ve read, only people who have issues with high blood pressure should be so mindful of salting foods and I think that’s another one that should be experimented with personally before drawing any conclusions about what ‘everyone’ ought to be doing. For the record, processed and packaged foods have way more added salt than any natural meat I’ve ever eaten, hence having to salt my home-cooked meats. 

    Tom: as for CarbSane, I followed a link to her blog the other day and it appears that she’s not anonymous anymore. I guess enough people wanted to know who she was that she updated her personal info and listed out her credentials. I’m sure someone else might leave a comment about this but I thought I’d mention it:)

    As for Hope’s recommendations: I did my own personal experiment of 1 eating her USDA recommended diet for year and years, so I believe in the power of such experiments. I wasted a lot of years being misinformed by these so-called ‘experts’ at the USDA, so instead of just blindly recommending what I believe works (as Hope does) I always tell people my successful experience with low carb living and encourage people to give it a try and see how it works for them. Not everyone wants to give up the carbs, so they have that choice–it’s always up to the individual. I think all the people here are so adamant about eating this way because of how successful they’ve been. 

    I didn’t realize she’d finally claimed an indentity. After she started going wacko on Gary Taubes and anyone who agrees with him (including me), I chose to ignore her.

  18. Jan

    Carbsane is no longer anonymous. Well, she at least has a name on her blog, and gives her “credentials.” Her MO has not changed, though – plenty of scientific doublespeak, which she refuses to clarify for us poor, dumb masses and plenty of mudslinging and vitriol towards anyone who doesn’t agree with her completely and unreservedly. The only blogger more entertaining these days is Don Matesz, who has just fallen off the deep end.

    I didn’t realize she’d finally attached a name to her relentless attacks.

  19. Pete Ballerstedt

    There is no requirement for dietary fiber in the human diet. As Gary Taubes thoroughly documents in chapter 7 of Good Calories, Bad Calories, the idea that fiber is necessary is a product of lipophobia, not science.

    “The evidence that led Peter Cleave to propose this alternative theory – the disparity in disease rates among populations , the intimate relationship of atherosclerosis, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, and the apparent absence of chronic disease in populations relatively free of Western influences – had to be explained in other ways if they were to be consistent with Keys’s [sic] hypothesis. Giver, the indigestible carbohydrates in vegetables, starches, and grains, now replaced refined carbohydrates and sugar in the debate about the nutritional causes of chronic disease. The fiber hypothesis captured the public’s nutritional consciousness by virtue of the messianic efforts of a single investigator, a former missionary surgeon named Denis Burkitt, who proposed that this indigestible roughage was a requisiste component of a healthy diet. The notion was consistent with Keys’s [sic] hypothesis, which was not the case with Cleave’s or Yudkin’s hypothesis, and it resonated also with the era’s countercultural leanings toward diets heavy in vegetables, legumes, and cereal grains.

    “Burkitt’s fiber hypothesis was based originally and in its entirety on Cleave’s saccharine-disease hypothesis, but simply inverted the causal agent. Rather than proclaim, as Cleave did, that chronic disease was caused by the addition of sugar and refined carbohydrates to diets that we had evolved naturally to eat, Burkitt laid the blame on the subtraction of the fiber from those evolutionarily ideal diets, which in turn led to constipation and then, through a variety of mechanisms, all the chronic diseases of civilization.” (page 124)

    “Over the last quarter-century, Burkitt’s fiber hypothesis has become yet another example of Francis Bacon’s dictum of “wishful science” – there has been a steady accumulation of evidence refuting the notion that a fiber-deficient diet causes colon cancer, polyps, or diverticulitis, let alone any other disease of civilization. The pattern is precisely what would be expected of a hypothesis that simply isn’t true: the larger and more rigorous the trials set up to test it, the more consistently negative the evidence.” (page 132)

    “Burkitt’s hypothesis got accepted pretty well worldwide, quite quickly, but it has gradually been disproved,” said Richard Doll, who had endorsed the hypothesis enthusiastically in the mid-1970s. “It still holds up in relation to constipation, but as far as a major factor in the common diseases of the developed world, no, fiber is not the answer. That’s pretty clear.” (page 133)

  20. Robinowitz

    Regarding Hunter’s comment: I don’t believe Hope was recommending limiting meat because it’s (supposedly) high in sodium. She recommends this because it’s higher in saturated fat, just like the full fat dairy she vilifies. I have personally never attempted to limit salt consumption in my life and always salt my foods and yet somehow have never had anything but perfect blood pressure, even on a LCHF diet in which I use abundant Celtic sea salt on meats, veggies, sauces, etc. I know this is just my own anecdotal experience, but I just think that there is so much misinformation being spread about the evils of salting foods that I just had to comment. From what I’ve read, only people who have issues with high blood pressure should be so mindful of salting foods and I think that’s another one that should be experimented with personally before drawing any conclusions about what ‘everyone’ ought to be doing. For the record, processed and packaged foods have way more added salt than any natural meat I’ve ever eaten, hence having to salt my home-cooked meats. 

    Tom: as for CarbSane, I followed a link to her blog the other day and it appears that she’s not anonymous anymore. I guess enough people wanted to know who she was that she updated her personal info and listed out her credentials. I’m sure someone else might leave a comment about this but I thought I’d mention it:)

    As for Hope’s recommendations: I did my own personal experiment of 1 eating her USDA recommended diet for year and years, so I believe in the power of such experiments. I wasted a lot of years being misinformed by these so-called ‘experts’ at the USDA, so instead of just blindly recommending what I believe works (as Hope does) I always tell people my successful experience with low carb living and encourage people to give it a try and see how it works for them. Not everyone wants to give up the carbs, so they have that choice–it’s always up to the individual. I think all the people here are so adamant about eating this way because of how successful they’ve been. 

    I didn’t realize she’d finally claimed an indentity. After she started going wacko on Gary Taubes and anyone who agrees with him (including me), I chose to ignore her.

  21. Jan

    Carbsane is no longer anonymous. Well, she at least has a name on her blog, and gives her “credentials.” Her MO has not changed, though – plenty of scientific doublespeak, which she refuses to clarify for us poor, dumb masses and plenty of mudslinging and vitriol towards anyone who doesn’t agree with her completely and unreservedly. The only blogger more entertaining these days is Don Matesz, who has just fallen off the deep end.

    I didn’t realize she’d finally attached a name to her relentless attacks.

  22. Pete Ballerstedt

    There is no requirement for dietary fiber in the human diet. As Gary Taubes thoroughly documents in chapter 7 of Good Calories, Bad Calories, the idea that fiber is necessary is a product of lipophobia, not science.

    “The evidence that led Peter Cleave to propose this alternative theory – the disparity in disease rates among populations , the intimate relationship of atherosclerosis, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes, and the apparent absence of chronic disease in populations relatively free of Western influences – had to be explained in other ways if they were to be consistent with Keys’s [sic] hypothesis. Giver, the indigestible carbohydrates in vegetables, starches, and grains, now replaced refined carbohydrates and sugar in the debate about the nutritional causes of chronic disease. The fiber hypothesis captured the public’s nutritional consciousness by virtue of the messianic efforts of a single investigator, a former missionary surgeon named Denis Burkitt, who proposed that this indigestible roughage was a requisiste component of a healthy diet. The notion was consistent with Keys’s [sic] hypothesis, which was not the case with Cleave’s or Yudkin’s hypothesis, and it resonated also with the era’s countercultural leanings toward diets heavy in vegetables, legumes, and cereal grains.

    “Burkitt’s fiber hypothesis was based originally and in its entirety on Cleave’s saccharine-disease hypothesis, but simply inverted the causal agent. Rather than proclaim, as Cleave did, that chronic disease was caused by the addition of sugar and refined carbohydrates to diets that we had evolved naturally to eat, Burkitt laid the blame on the subtraction of the fiber from those evolutionarily ideal diets, which in turn led to constipation and then, through a variety of mechanisms, all the chronic diseases of civilization.” (page 124)

    “Over the last quarter-century, Burkitt’s fiber hypothesis has become yet another example of Francis Bacon’s dictum of “wishful science” – there has been a steady accumulation of evidence refuting the notion that a fiber-deficient diet causes colon cancer, polyps, or diverticulitis, let alone any other disease of civilization. The pattern is precisely what would be expected of a hypothesis that simply isn’t true: the larger and more rigorous the trials set up to test it, the more consistently negative the evidence.” (page 132)

    “Burkitt’s hypothesis got accepted pretty well worldwide, quite quickly, but it has gradually been disproved,” said Richard Doll, who had endorsed the hypothesis enthusiastically in the mid-1970s. “It still holds up in relation to constipation, but as far as a major factor in the common diseases of the developed world, no, fiber is not the answer. That’s pretty clear.” (page 133)

  23. Peggy Cihocki

    @Hunter, “fiber helps in the digestion process.” No, Dana is correct. It actually it doesn’t. It “helps” the absorption process–by speeding up the rate at which food passes through the digestive system, it allows less to be absorbed, which is only helpful if it’s something you DON’T want to absorb, like too much glucose. As Dana said, it can also prevent full absorption of vitamins and minerals in food, so it is a double edged sword.
    “…merely suggesting she said avoid meats with higher sodium content..not to avoid sodium.” And the difference is?

  24. Ryan

    The problem with most “diabetes experts” is that they are caught in a Catch-22 provided by the Lipid Theory. Fat causes heart disease. T2 diabetics get heart disease at a higher rate than non-T2’s, therefore T2’s shouldn’t eat fat. Since you can’t just eat protein, the other calories have to come from carbs. Since the carbs will raise the blood sugar, insulin or some other drug is necessary to keep the blood sugar down and retard the disease (when my dad was diagnosed with T2 diabetes, his doctor told him that you can’t stop it, you can only slow it). In their minds, it comes down to dying from a heart attack or having poor glucose control.

    Unfortunately, until the Lipid Theory dies and experts start looking at obesity, diabetes and heart disease as concurrent symptoms instead of disease progression, there won’t be a change in their recommendations.

    Bingo. It all starts with the misguided idea that fat causes heart disease.

  25. Laura

    Went back to that site to see if there are any diabetics on the forum and how they’re fairing. A new member has started a thread looking for help because his blood sugars have shot up to 251. He’s been told by various posters to “stick with it”, “double check how much fat you’re eating. The lower you can get the fat intake, the better for bringing blood sugars down”, “Measure your progress over months”, and someone else in the same boat has “just stopped worrying about it”.

    Oh my lord … stick with it?!!

  26. C

    Sheeshalicious. I need to send this to my grandpa. I was over at his house the other day and he was talking about how he shouldn’t eat potatoes because they’re supposed to raise his blood sugar faster than whole grains. HA. If only he knew…well, I guess he will know once he checks his e-mail. 🙂

    It would be worth checking with a glucose meter. Reactions vary among individuals.

  27. Peggy Cihocki

    @Hunter, “fiber helps in the digestion process.” No, Dana is correct. It actually it doesn’t. It “helps” the absorption process–by speeding up the rate at which food passes through the digestive system, it allows less to be absorbed, which is only helpful if it’s something you DON’T want to absorb, like too much glucose. As Dana said, it can also prevent full absorption of vitamins and minerals in food, so it is a double edged sword.
    “…merely suggesting she said avoid meats with higher sodium content..not to avoid sodium.” And the difference is?

  28. Ryan

    The problem with most “diabetes experts” is that they are caught in a Catch-22 provided by the Lipid Theory. Fat causes heart disease. T2 diabetics get heart disease at a higher rate than non-T2’s, therefore T2’s shouldn’t eat fat. Since you can’t just eat protein, the other calories have to come from carbs. Since the carbs will raise the blood sugar, insulin or some other drug is necessary to keep the blood sugar down and retard the disease (when my dad was diagnosed with T2 diabetes, his doctor told him that you can’t stop it, you can only slow it). In their minds, it comes down to dying from a heart attack or having poor glucose control.

    Unfortunately, until the Lipid Theory dies and experts start looking at obesity, diabetes and heart disease as concurrent symptoms instead of disease progression, there won’t be a change in their recommendations.

    Bingo. It all starts with the misguided idea that fat causes heart disease.

  29. Laura

    Went back to that site to see if there are any diabetics on the forum and how they’re fairing. A new member has started a thread looking for help because his blood sugars have shot up to 251. He’s been told by various posters to “stick with it”, “double check how much fat you’re eating. The lower you can get the fat intake, the better for bringing blood sugars down”, “Measure your progress over months”, and someone else in the same boat has “just stopped worrying about it”.

    Oh my lord … stick with it?!!

  30. C

    Sheeshalicious. I need to send this to my grandpa. I was over at his house the other day and he was talking about how he shouldn’t eat potatoes because they’re supposed to raise his blood sugar faster than whole grains. HA. If only he knew…well, I guess he will know once he checks his e-mail. 🙂

    It would be worth checking with a glucose meter. Reactions vary among individuals.

  31. C

    @HW
    My mom buys Greek yogurt from WinCo. The full-fat stuff is amazingly popular there…the non-fat Greek yogurt shelf was totally full while the full-fat shelf was half empty. It’s SO delicious, it’s really thick and has I THINK like 8 carbs per cup, compared to the 18 carbs in most whole-milk yogurt.

  32. C

    Oh, nevermind. Greek yogurt has 11 carbs per cup. I was thinking of this Bulgarian yogurt at some organic food store my mom goes to, Natures Food Co-Op. That yogurt has 8 carbs per cup, but it’s more watery and has sort of a tangy flavor.

  33. C

    @HW
    My mom buys Greek yogurt from WinCo. The full-fat stuff is amazingly popular there…the non-fat Greek yogurt shelf was totally full while the full-fat shelf was half empty. It’s SO delicious, it’s really thick and has I THINK like 8 carbs per cup, compared to the 18 carbs in most whole-milk yogurt.

  34. C

    Oh, nevermind. Greek yogurt has 11 carbs per cup. I was thinking of this Bulgarian yogurt at some organic food store my mom goes to, Natures Food Co-Op. That yogurt has 8 carbs per cup, but it’s more watery and has sort of a tangy flavor.

  35. Stacie

    While I do not disagree that obesity, diabetes, and heart disease can be concurrent symptoms of an unhealthy diet, I believe there is more to heart disease than just diet. My husband is a case in point. After being diagnosed with CAD and having one stent put in, we went low carb. My husband lost 25+ lbs, his GERD disappeared, blood pressure lowered, pains went away, etc. Oh, the thing that precipitated his going to the doctor was chest pains. Interestingly, he was also very sick the day he had chest pains, a flu -like illness. Five months after the stents, he again experienced chest pain/discomfort. Prior to that, he had been sick with an infectious disease (shingles) for a couple of weeks. Six months after second episode, he required two more stents. What I find amazing is that after he had shingles and experienced the chest discomfort, he felt fine and had no pain. His diet was great, he started lifting weights, and was walking. I think the low-carb diet actually enabled him to compensate for any arterial damage(just my opinion). The point is, diet may not be the only cause of CAD. (endothelial dysfunction) I think that Drs. Ravnskov and Kendrick are right about stress and infection causing CAD.

  36. Peggy Cihocki

    I’m thinking the carb count of yogurt is extrapolated from the carb count of the milk used to make it? If so, since at least some of the lactose in the milk gets converted to lactic acid in the process of turning it into yogurt, most yogurt actually has fewer carbs than it says on the label. I could be wrong, though. Anyone know?

  37. Stacie

    While I do not disagree that obesity, diabetes, and heart disease can be concurrent symptoms of an unhealthy diet, I believe there is more to heart disease than just diet. My husband is a case in point. After being diagnosed with CAD and having one stent put in, we went low carb. My husband lost 25+ lbs, his GERD disappeared, blood pressure lowered, pains went away, etc. Oh, the thing that precipitated his going to the doctor was chest pains. Interestingly, he was also very sick the day he had chest pains, a flu -like illness. Five months after the stents, he again experienced chest pain/discomfort. Prior to that, he had been sick with an infectious disease (shingles) for a couple of weeks. Six months after second episode, he required two more stents. What I find amazing is that after he had shingles and experienced the chest discomfort, he felt fine and had no pain. His diet was great, he started lifting weights, and was walking. I think the low-carb diet actually enabled him to compensate for any arterial damage(just my opinion). The point is, diet may not be the only cause of CAD. (endothelial dysfunction) I think that Drs. Ravnskov and Kendrick are right about stress and infection causing CAD.

  38. townCryer

    Tom,

    Can’t help but notice here your pathetic bias towards vegetarians and a vegan lifestyle. I’m not quite sure why you hate grains that much either (possibly a mixture of your hatred towards USDA/government and liberals?). Everytime someone asks you why people in other countries who have a high carb consumption aren’t morbidly obese like us, you come back with ‘but they don’t eat Little Debbie Snack Cakes and Potato Chips!’. Yea, we know. No one advocates eating sugary, fattening foods.

    Anyways, I couldn’t help but notice that…..very few people that follow a low carb diet actually look good. Yes, I know I know, every time some one on here mentions that most vegans look pretty skinny, you claim they are ‘walking cadavers’. OK, well let’s take a look at some low carbers, shall we? These are people that are so indoctrinated to a low carb diet that they went on a Low Carb Cruise. Yes, the same one that Tom went on. Some people following a low carb diet:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4454701243/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4455478762/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4455478260/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4456551346/in/photostream

    Wow, they look really healthy! But hey, at least their blood sugar might be low (maybe) from not eating grains. In case anyone is wondering, these are published photos of an online photo blog from the low carb cruise that Tom has been raving about.

    I noticed you went out and found the biggest people you could. What you don’t know (or don’t care to know) is that in some cases you are looking at people who’ve lost more than 100 pounds and kept it off. And nearly every one of them tried a vegetarian diet somewhere along the way and only got fatter — which is exactly what happened to me, by the way. When I was at my fattest and sickest, I was a vegetarian.

    You could also (if you were honest) find plenty of before and after pictures of people who went on a low-carb diet and look quite impressively lean now. But of course you have no interest in that. My “pathetic bias” isn’t towards any lifestyle; it’s towards the vegan zealots who troll blogs and insist we should all adopt a lifestyle that has already failed miserably for many people among my readership … the pat answer always being “You didin’t do it right.” Or any of the excuses offered (hilariously) by this writer:

    http://www.beyondveg.com/nicholson-w/29reasons/29reasons.shtml

    We’ve seen many of the reasons he lists posted here by vegan zealots, of course.

  39. Peggy Cihocki

    I’m thinking the carb count of yogurt is extrapolated from the carb count of the milk used to make it? If so, since at least some of the lactose in the milk gets converted to lactic acid in the process of turning it into yogurt, most yogurt actually has fewer carbs than it says on the label. I could be wrong, though. Anyone know?

  40. MikeC

    See if he’ll run the experiment again after eating some bacon & eggs, or a ham & cheese omelet.

    He repeated it with a meat and vegetables meal and peaked at a little over 100.

  41. townCryer

    Tom,

    Can’t help but notice here your pathetic bias towards vegetarians and a vegan lifestyle. I’m not quite sure why you hate grains that much either (possibly a mixture of your hatred towards USDA/government and liberals?). Everytime someone asks you why people in other countries who have a high carb consumption aren’t morbidly obese like us, you come back with ‘but they don’t eat Little Debbie Snack Cakes and Potato Chips!’. Yea, we know. No one advocates eating sugary, fattening foods.

    Anyways, I couldn’t help but notice that…..very few people that follow a low carb diet actually look good. Yes, I know I know, every time some one on here mentions that most vegans look pretty skinny, you claim they are ‘walking cadavers’. OK, well let’s take a look at some low carbers, shall we? These are people that are so indoctrinated to a low carb diet that they went on a Low Carb Cruise. Yes, the same one that Tom went on. Some people following a low carb diet:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4454701243/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4455478762/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4455478260/in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkysgirl/4456551346/in/photostream

    Wow, they look really healthy! But hey, at least their blood sugar might be low (maybe) from not eating grains. In case anyone is wondering, these are published photos of an online photo blog from the low carb cruise that Tom has been raving about.

    I noticed you went out and found the biggest people you could. What you don’t know (or don’t care to know) is that in some cases you are looking at people who’ve lost more than 100 pounds and kept it off. And nearly every one of them tried a vegetarian diet somewhere along the way and only got fatter — which is exactly what happened to me, by the way. When I was at my fattest and sickest, I was a vegetarian.

    You could also (if you were honest) find plenty of before and after pictures of people who went on a low-carb diet and look quite impressively lean now. But of course you have no interest in that. My “pathetic bias” isn’t towards any lifestyle; it’s towards the vegan zealots who troll blogs and insist we should all adopt a lifestyle that has already failed miserably for many people among my readership … the pat answer always being “You didin’t do it right.” Or any of the excuses offered (hilariously) by this writer:

    http://www.beyondveg.com/nicholson-w/29reasons/29reasons.shtml

    We’ve seen many of the reasons he lists posted here by vegan zealots, of course.

  42. MikeC

    See if he’ll run the experiment again after eating some bacon & eggs, or a ham & cheese omelet.

    He repeated it with a meat and vegetables meal and peaked at a little over 100.

  43. Ned Kock

    Hi Tom.

    I think that the advice regarding the 140 limit is good, but I don’t think the evidence that levels higher than 140 lead to beta cell loss.

    What seems to happen is the reverse: beta cell loss leads to high glucose levels.

    Typically if you consume a certain amount of carbohydrates, you’ll get a proportional AUC (area under the curve) glucose response. Most people, but not all, can reduce the peak glucose level by consuming either protein or fat together with the carbs.

    Thank you for the clarification.

Comments are closed.