Low-Carb Pasta? In Your Dreams …

One of the most common questions I receive in emails goes something like this:  I know you don’t normally live on fast food like you did for your documentary, so what do you actually eat?

The answer is that my diet is what I’d call “modified paleo”:  meats, seafood, eggs, vegetables, nuts, a bit of low-sugar fruit, and a few dairy products.  But as with a lot of other low-carbers I know, my diet has evolved over time.

At first, I focused exclusively on keeping my carb intake down.  Anything labeled “low-carb” was acceptable, so I happily filled my refrigerator and pantry with low-carb versions of the high-carb foods I used to love … low-carb bagels, low-carb chips, low-carb bread, low-carb pastas, low-carb granola, low-carb ice cream, even low-carb candy bars.  I think that’s where a lot of us start.

But as I continued reading up on nutrition and health, I began asking myself if eating frankenfoods made from soy protein and other strange ingredients was really such a good idea.  Did I miss pasta that much?  Couldn’t I make it through the weekend without a bagel and cream cheese? Are nachos an essential food group once you’ve left college?

I eventually decided I could live without low-carb versions of high-carb foods and I’d probably be healthier without them.  That’s when I started shifting to more of a real-foods, modified paleo diet.  And over time, a strange and wonderful thing happened:  my tastes changed.  My “starch tooth” disappeared.  It no longer required discipline to say no thanks to pasta and bread, because they didn’t appeal to me anymore.

That’s why I never bothered trying Dreamfield’s pasta, which the manufacturer claims has only 5 net carbs per serving. Through the magic of “protected carbs,” most of the 41 carbs per serving supposedly slip by without causing a rise in blood sugar.  Frankly, even if that were true, I wouldn’t eat the stuff just because it’s made out of wheat.  But I also had my doubts about that “protected carbs” concept.

Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt had similar doubts and tested Dreamfield’s pasta on himself.  He showed us the results during his excellent presentation on the low-carb cruise, and today he wrote about them on his English-language blog.  I’ll let you go there to read about his results, but I am going to borrow a graphic he posted.  What you see below are the results of a small clinical study comparing the average blood-sugar readings of people who ate Dreamfield’s pasta for one test, then regular pasta for another:

Whoop-tee-do … what a difference, eh?  That one-hour peak of around 150 mg/dl is all I need to know. By contrast, I had a big ol’ gyros salad with extra gyros meat today while out running errands, then tested my glucose when I got home.  My 60-minute post-meal reading stood at 95 mg/dl.  Give me the gyros salad any day.

Jimmy Moore gave the head honcho at Dreamfield’s a chance to reply to the recent study results.  I’ve posted Jimmy’s YouTube video of that interview below.  Jimmy will also be posting the interview, along with his own test results.

I’m not going to comment on the interview.  I think it speaks for itself.  My only comment is this:  if you’re switching to a low-carb diet, your goal should be to make it a low-carb real-foods diet.  Buying low-carb breads and pastas is just another attempt to have your cake and eat it too.  Eventually, you’ll need to wave goodbye to that cake and move on.

Addendum:  Jimmy Moore posted the results of his own test a couple of hours after I wrote this post.


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130 thoughts on “Low-Carb Pasta? In Your Dreams …

  1. AllTooHuman

    If you want a great pasta alternative, try making spaghetti squash. Cut one in half, bake it in the oven, then scrape out the ‘pasta’. Fry it up in some coconut oil if you like more of pasta texture.

    With a nice paleo-friendly sauce on top it is actually better tasting than regular old pasta. At least that’s what we think.

    I’ve made some killer fettucine alfredo with spaghetti squash.

  2. johnmc

    I wondered about this stuff. I only bought it once. I found it only got in the way of the meat.

    As an aside, the original phrasing of “eat your cake and have it” makes more sense.

    I suppose that’s right.

  3. DoctorSH

    “OK, but isn’t whole wheat pasta ok to eat”
    “So what can I eat for breakfast?”
    “should I switch to skim milk and low fat yogurt?”
    “but won’t my cholesterol get worse”

  4. Rebecca Latham

    I went to an event tonight, and for a treat, they served coffee, lemonade, apple juice and some sort of yellow sheet cake with white frosting. It was a child-centered event, in case you didn’t guess. They also gave each child a ziplock bag with several types of candy, including straws filled with sugar and artificial colors and flavors. We used to call them Pixie Sticks when I was little.

    I drank water. I did not eat cake. I don’t care if it was high carb or low carb, it is still a non-food, and I had no desire to eat it. It looked kind of sickening, which, I guess, it actually is. It was easy to turn it down. My tastes have really changed since going low carb over two years ago.

    Even when I first started, I did not eat any low carb “products”. I’m a whole foods gal.

    You know your tastes have changed when the smell of a frosted cake or sugary donut makes you feel a little ill. That’s where I’m at now.

  5. Firebird

    I asked Dr. Greg Ellis a long time ago about the different pastas, low carb, gluten free, etc. He said that if you want to eat pasta, just eat regular pasta — corn, rice, quinoa, soy are no better.

    Ellis is a firm believer in low carbs, 60-80 gm/day range. But, if he has the craving for a cream filled donut, he’ll go to Dunkin Donuts, get one, take a couple of bites, then throw away the rest. He feels there is no harm in that. Doesn’t do it every day…maybe a couple of times a year.

    That’s pretty much what I do, too. If I feel like indulging in pizza and beer once in a blue moon, I have the real McCoy. Then I get back on track the next day.

  6. Halle

    I grew up on a very whole grains type of diet. My family misguidedly thought the extra fiber was good for my “intestinal problems” (I’ll spare you all the TMI details of such except to say that I was uncomfortable and in real pain a lot of the time.) It was a shocker when on my first go at low carb, I discovered a week in that without “whole grain” means no more stomach pain. Oh God I wish I’d known that 20 years ago! Recently, I cheated with two small bowls of spaghetti. Subsequently I was in so much pain. And I thought to myself “How did I live with this kind of pain every day all those years?” Needless to say, no more spaghetti cheats for me ever again. Even Dreamfields.

    One of the many reasons it drives me nuts that the USDA is pushing for more “healthy whole grains” in school lunches. Yeah, like the school nurse isn’t busy enough already.

  7. Dan

    Ironically, Dr. Atkins himself was the first guy to release the deluge of low carb products, with his shakes, candy bars, and even pasta. Stick to steak and brats.

    Yup, a lot of those low-carb substitutes I consumed had the Atkins label on them. I was pleased to see that the latest Atkins diet book has much more of a real-foods emphasis.

  8. Chris

    You’re right on about the “starch-tooth”. I was so impressed by your documentary, I ditched most carbs right off. And I was so disillusioned by my “healthy” diet of organic sticks and twigs and knocking myself out at the gym when what I really wanted was to go back to bed, that crackers and pasta have no appeal to me. Fry me up some sausage in butter! Nice to feel alive again at 44. I’m so happy you made that movie!!!

    I’m happy you watched it. Nothing beats realizing you can feel better now than you did 10 or 20 years ago.

  9. Stephanie O.

    As I listened to Jimmy’s interview I wondered if all of Mr. Crowley’s throat clearing was nerves or a post nasal drip from a wheat allergy.

    I’m guessing it was nerves. That interview isn’t going to do much for business.

  10. Jo

    Yeah, like you I started low carb and went semi paleo. After experimentation I found that the processed wheat free and low carb products made me feel just as bad as all the other processed rubbish.

    Low-carb or not, those foods don’t provide much in the way of essential nutrients.

  11. Bruno

    Saw the documentary, thought it was great, and it confirmed my distrust for Spurlock. I buy the theory in FatHead, but what about enjoyment of carbs? I have done Atkins type diets before and do lose weight. But I don’t enjoy it much after the first day or two. Even adding up to 100g of carbs later leaves me wanting sweets. I may not have a carb-tooth but I still think a chocolate chip cookie is the perfect food.

    Did not your own documentary show that one can still eat SOME of these foods and lose weight and see blood test results “improve”?

    The funniest part of the documentary was your “depression” depicted when eating your pretzels. I think I would be just as depressed snacking on meat while watching TV.

    btw, I walk about 25-30 miles a week in the course of my job so I agree excercise does not seem to help that much with weight loss, it only makes me ravenously hungry.

    You seem to be hardcore about this. That’s fine for you, but what about those who actually LIKE some of these other carb laden foods? honestly if it stays like it is now I’d probably trade 10 years of life and lessened health for the ability to eat some desserts in moderation.

    If you find your carb tolerance and stay below it, sure, you can eat some of those foods. You didn’t mention how long you stayed on the diet, but you if you stick it out for awhile, you may find your craving for them goes away.

  12. Barry

    Yep. My sister-in-law is on a strict gluten free diet because of health issues. She goes out of her way to get all of the “non-Gluten” fake products: bagels, cake, etc.

    I, too, three months ago when I started to go heavy on low carb (no bread, pasta, white anything) bought the Atkins bars, etc. Now it just seems lame to look for “low carb” pasta or bread. It ain’t that good in the first place (except for Costco’s sourdough, hot out of the oven) so why even eat it?

    I think it was Mark Sisson (could be wrong) who said, “Would you eat a bowl of pasta without butter or sauce? Do you like just plain bread or bagels or do you enjoy it for the butter, peanut butter, cream cheese and the stuff you put on it?” Think about the carb with nothing on it and then ask yourself, do you really need it? Has been pretty easy for me.

    Cheers!

    Once we realize that, we start putting the butter and sauce on something worthwhile, like spaghetti squash, spinach, or green beans.

  13. PK

    I used to make a lot of crustless low-carb cheesecake. But it soon became very apparent that I couldn’t control the amount I was eating of that either, real sugar or no real sugar. So I had to stop making it. I still struggle with cheating, but it’s far easier going without any treats than trying to substitute or moderate the amount of low carb treats I eat.

    I used to make those cheesecakes, too. Now they don’t seem worth the effort.

  14. AllTooHuman

    If you want a great pasta alternative, try making spaghetti squash. Cut one in half, bake it in the oven, then scrape out the ‘pasta’. Fry it up in some coconut oil if you like more of pasta texture.

    With a nice paleo-friendly sauce on top it is actually better tasting than regular old pasta. At least that’s what we think.

    I’ve made some killer fettucine alfredo with spaghetti squash.

  15. johnmc

    I wondered about this stuff. I only bought it once. I found it only got in the way of the meat.

    As an aside, the original phrasing of “eat your cake and have it” makes more sense.

    I suppose that’s right.

  16. DoctorSH

    “OK, but isn’t whole wheat pasta ok to eat”
    “So what can I eat for breakfast?”
    “should I switch to skim milk and low fat yogurt?”
    “but won’t my cholesterol get worse”

  17. Rebecca Latham

    I went to an event tonight, and for a treat, they served coffee, lemonade, apple juice and some sort of yellow sheet cake with white frosting. It was a child-centered event, in case you didn’t guess. They also gave each child a ziplock bag with several types of candy, including straws filled with sugar and artificial colors and flavors. We used to call them Pixie Sticks when I was little.

    I drank water. I did not eat cake. I don’t care if it was high carb or low carb, it is still a non-food, and I had no desire to eat it. It looked kind of sickening, which, I guess, it actually is. It was easy to turn it down. My tastes have really changed since going low carb over two years ago.

    Even when I first started, I did not eat any low carb “products”. I’m a whole foods gal.

    You know your tastes have changed when the smell of a frosted cake or sugary donut makes you feel a little ill. That’s where I’m at now.

  18. Tomas

    The other question that comes when buying “low carb” paste etc. is that if it’s going to only have 5 grams of carbohydrate as enegry, what’s of the rest of it?
    Guess it doesn’t take a genius to figure out it’s going down the drain trough your body. (For me it would probably take the quick way back upp.)
    So why eat it at all if it’s not going to do anything food is supposed to do?

    If 35 grams of food are listed as “protected,” that makes me a little nervous for exactly the reason you described. Is it like swallowing a penny?

  19. Firebird

    I asked Dr. Greg Ellis a long time ago about the different pastas, low carb, gluten free, etc. He said that if you want to eat pasta, just eat regular pasta — corn, rice, quinoa, soy are no better.

    Ellis is a firm believer in low carbs, 60-80 gm/day range. But, if he has the craving for a cream filled donut, he’ll go to Dunkin Donuts, get one, take a couple of bites, then throw away the rest. He feels there is no harm in that. Doesn’t do it every day…maybe a couple of times a year.

    That’s pretty much what I do, too. If I feel like indulging in pizza and beer once in a blue moon, I have the real McCoy. Then I get back on track the next day.

  20. Halle

    I grew up on a very whole grains type of diet. My family misguidedly thought the extra fiber was good for my “intestinal problems” (I’ll spare you all the TMI details of such except to say that I was uncomfortable and in real pain a lot of the time.) It was a shocker when on my first go at low carb, I discovered a week in that without “whole grain” means no more stomach pain. Oh God I wish I’d known that 20 years ago! Recently, I cheated with two small bowls of spaghetti. Subsequently I was in so much pain. And I thought to myself “How did I live with this kind of pain every day all those years?” Needless to say, no more spaghetti cheats for me ever again. Even Dreamfields.

    One of the many reasons it drives me nuts that the USDA is pushing for more “healthy whole grains” in school lunches. Yeah, like the school nurse isn’t busy enough already.

  21. Paul

    I agree with you – modified paleo. I found a good place to start was Michael Pollan’s Food Rules. Put simply, get off adulterated food, use the best whole food you can afford, prepare your own meals and eat at the table with other people. Then tweak: Dr Davis – no grains; Dr Lustig – limit fructose; Dr Harris – no seed oils. But, if you are still not losing weight, then add Gary Taubes / Atkins and lower the remaining carbs. Lose weight and look great.

    Follow those rules and you end up low-carb anyway, unless you put a lot of tubers into the mix.

  22. Dan

    Ironically, Dr. Atkins himself was the first guy to release the deluge of low carb products, with his shakes, candy bars, and even pasta. Stick to steak and brats.

    Yup, a lot of those low-carb substitutes I consumed had the Atkins label on them. I was pleased to see that the latest Atkins diet book has much more of a real-foods emphasis.

  23. Chris

    You’re right on about the “starch-tooth”. I was so impressed by your documentary, I ditched most carbs right off. And I was so disillusioned by my “healthy” diet of organic sticks and twigs and knocking myself out at the gym when what I really wanted was to go back to bed, that crackers and pasta have no appeal to me. Fry me up some sausage in butter! Nice to feel alive again at 44. I’m so happy you made that movie!!!

    I’m happy you watched it. Nothing beats realizing you can feel better now than you did 10 or 20 years ago.

  24. Stephanie O.

    As I listened to Jimmy’s interview I wondered if all of Mr. Crowley’s throat clearing was nerves or a post nasal drip from a wheat allergy.

    I’m guessing it was nerves. That interview isn’t going to do much for business.

  25. Jo

    Yeah, like you I started low carb and went semi paleo. After experimentation I found that the processed wheat free and low carb products made me feel just as bad as all the other processed rubbish.

    Low-carb or not, those foods don’t provide much in the way of essential nutrients.

  26. C

    Oh I love low-carb substitutes. Only I like to make then myself out of more natural ingredients. Instead of bread I eat Oopsy rolls (idk if you’ve heard of them, it’s pretty much just cream cheese and egg whites). And on the weekends I make desserts, like the coconut cookies I made which is just coconut, heavy whipping cream, Splenda, egg whites, and vanilla. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with still eating the foods you love, just don’t go all whacky processed crap food.

    Sure, you could say my whipped cauliflower is a low-carb substitute for mashed potatoes. But it’s real food, unlike most of those off-the-shelf low-carb substitutes.

  27. Bruno

    Saw the documentary, thought it was great, and it confirmed my distrust for Spurlock. I buy the theory in FatHead, but what about enjoyment of carbs? I have done Atkins type diets before and do lose weight. But I don’t enjoy it much after the first day or two. Even adding up to 100g of carbs later leaves me wanting sweets. I may not have a carb-tooth but I still think a chocolate chip cookie is the perfect food.

    Did not your own documentary show that one can still eat SOME of these foods and lose weight and see blood test results “improve”?

    The funniest part of the documentary was your “depression” depicted when eating your pretzels. I think I would be just as depressed snacking on meat while watching TV.

    btw, I walk about 25-30 miles a week in the course of my job so I agree excercise does not seem to help that much with weight loss, it only makes me ravenously hungry.

    You seem to be hardcore about this. That’s fine for you, but what about those who actually LIKE some of these other carb laden foods? honestly if it stays like it is now I’d probably trade 10 years of life and lessened health for the ability to eat some desserts in moderation.

    If you find your carb tolerance and stay below it, sure, you can eat some of those foods. You didn’t mention how long you stayed on the diet, but you if you stick it out for awhile, you may find your craving for them goes away.

  28. mezzo

    “Ersatz” is “Ersatz” is “Ersatz. The point – made a zillion times before – is to eat real food. If I wanted pasta, I’d buy and eat the best Italian pasta to be had. If I want bread, I’ll eat the the best there is. Fortunately I don’t want any of them very often…Why substitute Frankenfoods for real ones? Hats off to Jimmy for his bit of self-testing but he might be well-advised to lose the frankenfoods that I have seen creeping in on his food blog and switch to real food again. Carb-creeping….beware.

  29. Barry

    Yep. My sister-in-law is on a strict gluten free diet because of health issues. She goes out of her way to get all of the “non-Gluten” fake products: bagels, cake, etc.

    I, too, three months ago when I started to go heavy on low carb (no bread, pasta, white anything) bought the Atkins bars, etc. Now it just seems lame to look for “low carb” pasta or bread. It ain’t that good in the first place (except for Costco’s sourdough, hot out of the oven) so why even eat it?

    I think it was Mark Sisson (could be wrong) who said, “Would you eat a bowl of pasta without butter or sauce? Do you like just plain bread or bagels or do you enjoy it for the butter, peanut butter, cream cheese and the stuff you put on it?” Think about the carb with nothing on it and then ask yourself, do you really need it? Has been pretty easy for me.

    Cheers!

    Once we realize that, we start putting the butter and sauce on something worthwhile, like spaghetti squash, spinach, or green beans.

  30. PK

    I used to make a lot of crustless low-carb cheesecake. But it soon became very apparent that I couldn’t control the amount I was eating of that either, real sugar or no real sugar. So I had to stop making it. I still struggle with cheating, but it’s far easier going without any treats than trying to substitute or moderate the amount of low carb treats I eat.

    I used to make those cheesecakes, too. Now they don’t seem worth the effort.

  31. Reid

    Your documentary started me on a truth quest. I went right to “no carbs”. I lost over 50 pounds in two months and now weigh 220. So first, thank you! I read your blog about fasting where you checked your bloodsugar. Over the past month my bloodsugar has tested steadily in the high 50’s. I’ve looked into hypoglycemia and read a low carb diet is recommened. I don’t have any symptoms of hypoglycemia and wanted to know where I could find more information.

    If anyone has good sources on low-carb and hypoglycemia, chime in.

  32. Tomas

    The other question that comes when buying “low carb” paste etc. is that if it’s going to only have 5 grams of carbohydrate as enegry, what’s of the rest of it?
    Guess it doesn’t take a genius to figure out it’s going down the drain trough your body. (For me it would probably take the quick way back upp.)
    So why eat it at all if it’s not going to do anything food is supposed to do?

    If 35 grams of food are listed as “protected,” that makes me a little nervous for exactly the reason you described. Is it like swallowing a penny?

  33. Andrés

    You MUST stop promoting cheese: low-carb/paleo movement is not going to win the battle if we keep allowing free thinking and personal choices at the barracks. We can beat the vegan clearly in this aspect, since they keep praising some researchers that commit slaughter on those nice little mice (I don’t buy the argument that they are volunteers), such as Dr. T. Colin Campbell, and killing mosquitos on summer. We can construct a real and rigid self-consistent ideology. You know, if then anybody fails on improving their health will be not doubt their fault, not a faulty dangerously too fuzzy set of instructions.

    I’ll try to become more rigid. It’s for the cause.

  34. Paul

    I agree with you – modified paleo. I found a good place to start was Michael Pollan’s Food Rules. Put simply, get off adulterated food, use the best whole food you can afford, prepare your own meals and eat at the table with other people. Then tweak: Dr Davis – no grains; Dr Lustig – limit fructose; Dr Harris – no seed oils. But, if you are still not losing weight, then add Gary Taubes / Atkins and lower the remaining carbs. Lose weight and look great.

    Follow those rules and you end up low-carb anyway, unless you put a lot of tubers into the mix.

  35. Auntie M

    I think the Dreamfields guy sounded ready to have a panic attack. Jimmy Moore is terrifying!

    There are two boxes of Dreamfields on my counter. One is open, but I haven’t had any in a couple of months. The other one is going straight to the church food bank, though I hate to feed them junk. I’ve used it before, but these days it just doesn’t taste right to eat pasta at all. I need to remember to send my husband out for spaghetti squash.

    Jimmy made a good point in his post, though: try the blood sugar test for yourself if you absolutely must have pasta. That’s what separates you guys from the “diet gurus”; you encourage thinking and experimentation, not blind obedience.

    I’d extend that advice to include a lot of foods. Test for yourself. Some supposedly low-glycemic foods may surprise you.

  36. C

    Oh I love low-carb substitutes. Only I like to make then myself out of more natural ingredients. Instead of bread I eat Oopsy rolls (idk if you’ve heard of them, it’s pretty much just cream cheese and egg whites). And on the weekends I make desserts, like the coconut cookies I made which is just coconut, heavy whipping cream, Splenda, egg whites, and vanilla. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with still eating the foods you love, just don’t go all whacky processed crap food.

    Sure, you could say my whipped cauliflower is a low-carb substitute for mashed potatoes. But it’s real food, unlike most of those off-the-shelf low-carb substitutes.

  37. Anne Robertson

    I never liked much in the way of carbs, even as a kid. I only started eating pasta and potatoes because I thought they were supposed to be good for me. I gave them all up with great relief and feel much better for it. Steamed shredded cabbage makes a good vehicle for pasta sauces, meaty ones, of course! And it’s always been easier for me to cook real food since, as a blind person, all cans and boxes look the same to me and I can’t read the instructions without jumping through hoops.

  38. bw

    I’ve already got a plan for sweettooth… if it comes up (hasn’t yet) wife and I will bake 2 mini apple pies in small ramekins.. I figure we make the crust and use TONS of butter to help dilute the flour in it (which of course makes the crust super tasty and flakey…)… and then granny smith apples….unsweetened….. and no top crust….

    Figure that shouldn’t be ‘too’ bad carb wise….

  39. Josh Goguen

    I can’t blame people for buying into this. In the world of iPods and Super Hadron Colliders, low-carb pasta doesn’t sound impossible. Then again, the more science tinkers with food, the more I think I’d be better off if I ate the iPod.

    What’s that my Grandpa used to say? Oh yeah, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” Of course he never clarified it “It probably is” means it’s true or not. I think when I pass it on to my kids, I’ll say “If it sounds too good to be true, it’s bologna.”

  40. mezzo

    “Ersatz” is “Ersatz” is “Ersatz. The point – made a zillion times before – is to eat real food. If I wanted pasta, I’d buy and eat the best Italian pasta to be had. If I want bread, I’ll eat the the best there is. Fortunately I don’t want any of them very often…Why substitute Frankenfoods for real ones? Hats off to Jimmy for his bit of self-testing but he might be well-advised to lose the frankenfoods that I have seen creeping in on his food blog and switch to real food again. Carb-creeping….beware.

  41. Lisa

    I find carbs are like what alcohol must be to an alcoholic.
    When I have “a bite”, the cravings come back and i don’t want to go through withdraw again. If I have a substitute I miss the real deal. If I don’t have the substitute, I don’t miss ANY of it.
    I find life without carb subs or a little bit of carbs (as treats or cheats) much easier (no tummy aches, no feeling deprived).
    L

    I think for some people, that’s true. Even a low-carb bread or pasta could trigger the craving for more starches.

  42. Ricardo

    So sugar and Fructose are different? Though i imagine they both do the same things

    Table sugar is around 50% glucose, 50% fructose. HFCS is more like 45% glucose, 55% fructose. Fructose is metabolized in the liver, which is why too much of it can lead to fatty liver.

  43. Reid

    Your documentary started me on a truth quest. I went right to “no carbs”. I lost over 50 pounds in two months and now weigh 220. So first, thank you! I read your blog about fasting where you checked your bloodsugar. Over the past month my bloodsugar has tested steadily in the high 50’s. I’ve looked into hypoglycemia and read a low carb diet is recommened. I don’t have any symptoms of hypoglycemia and wanted to know where I could find more information.

    If anyone has good sources on low-carb and hypoglycemia, chime in.

  44. Milton

    Life is about compromise, and diet is no different. While I have not had cravings for the foods I have given up (particularly sugary/salty snacks) I know that I am missing out on the flavors and textures that I enjoyed for a long time. But the upshot is that I feel a lot better, not just healthier but more energetic, and I sleep much MUCH better these days. And the foods I do eat are also very tasty and fulfilling, and are foods that I always enjoyed. The positives outweigh the negatives by so much that I don’t regret making the changes I’ve made.

    I think more people need to notice that you often promote the idea that we should figure out our own diet– the one that works best for us. The best thing about the sites that promote better eating is that most of them (like yours) give us useful information and encourage us to figure out our own diet. I think that when we do it this way, we are more likely to (1)find a diet that is ideal for us and (2)stick with it instead of dropping it once we reach a goal. Figuring out my own diet is also a win-win, where the positives far outweigh any negatives.

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