Back From The Cruise

      104 Comments on Back From The Cruise

I had such a great vacation, I’m exhausted. I guess that’s the result of too many late nights hanging around the karaoke bar on the Carnival Freedom, followed by too many early-morning seminars and shore excursions. In any case, it’s good to be back.

Before I write about the low-carb cruise, I need to give a big thanks to the Older Brother for sitting in the official Fat Head chair while I was gone. He not only wrote two excellent posts, he also answered all the comments, including those that came in on posts I wrote before leaving. Best of all, his replies were informative while still including the requisite amount of wisecracking. As I checked in over the course of the week, I was beginning to feel a bit like Johnny Carson back in the day, wondering why that Leno guy was drawing such big ratings as a guest host.

For those of you who asked, yes, the Older Brother is certainly invited to write more guest posts. I’m also considering updating my will so that if I croak before retiring, this blog will be turned over to him.  In the meantime, he’ll be writing regularly on his own brand-spankin’ new blog, JerryNaughton.com.

His post about the wide variety of low-carb meals he and The Wife make at home reminded me of a question a reader asked before I left: how do you eat low-carb on a cruise? The answer: Are you kidding me?! It couldn’t be easier. Where else can you grab a plate at lunch and take your pick of salads, vegetables, cold cuts, cheeses, burgers, tandoori chicken, curried fish, pork loin, salmon, or roast beef? Where else can you toddle down to a restaurant for breakfast and fill your plate with any combination of bacon, sausage, ham, scrambled eggs, omelets, or Eggs Benedict without the muffins?

It didn’t occur to me until the end of the cruise to take food pictures, but here’s what I got:

Our dinners during the week included prime rib, lobster, Cornish game hen, flat-iron steaks, salmon, cream soups, shrimp cocktails, and a variety of salads and vegetable dishes. The great thing about having dinner on a Carnival cruise is that you can just keep ordering. One night my prime rib didn’t quite fill me up, so I ordered the lobster for dessert. Not to be outdone, Fred Hahn ate five lobsters. Yes, five.

After indulging in all that great food for a week, the scale in the gym told me I’d lost two pounds.  Boy, I’ve got to stop eating like this.

There were more than 100 people in the low-carb group, so we took up an entire section of our dining room. Tables were assigned, but those of us who were speakers rotated to a different table every night, which gave me the chance to meet several loyal blog readers and Fat Head fans. That was perhaps the best part of the whole cruise … along with watching the waiters looking confused when everybody in our section turned down the dinner rolls.

The second night, Chareva and I sat at a table full of Swedes and learned that 20 people on this year’s cruise were from Sweden. (Given Sweden’s small population, I’m guessing the folks back home were wondering where the heck everybody went.) For those of you who don’t already know, there’s been a diet revolution going on in Sweden. I’ll explain how it happened in a future post, but the upshot is that after some heated national debates, the Swedish health service officially declared the Lipid Hypothesis dead. (Please, let that happen here next.) The popular diet in Sweden isn’t even called low-carb — it’s called low-carb/high-fat. In other words, they get it. Fat is good for you. Butter and eggs are health food.

The Swedish gentleman getting friendly with Chareva in the picture below figured out that fat is good for you even before the Swedish government did – by accident.

Sten (his first name) was overweight and sick for much of his adult life, and the standard-issue advice wasn’t helping him. Figuring he was going to die soon anyway, he said to heck with it (häcklaren med det in Swedish) and began living on bacon, eggs, butter, steaks, and all the other high-fat foods that were supposed to kill him. But a funny happened on the way to the Viking funeral: he began losing weight and feeling better. If you look closely at his shirt, you can see a picture of him posing with the pants he used to wear.

Another Swede I got to know is Katarina Wikholm (below). Like me, she’s the opinionated type, and we ended up having a debate one night which (if memory serves … which it doesn’t) had something to do with libertarianism and the World Court, among other issues. Then we became buddies. She assured me that my debating skills had been seriously hampered by a bit too much red wine, and she’s no doubt correct. Oh well … after finishing a huge project (such as a new speech), I tend to cut loose at least once.

I’m sure many of the Swedes were aboard because of this man, Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt (below), who has achieved something approaching rock-star status in Sweden. (I don’t know of any rock stars who are 12 feet tall, but go with me on this.)

Dr. Eenfeldt’s presentation on the diet revolution in Sweden rocked the house – pretty neat trick, since this was only his third time giving a lecture in English. Frankly, I wish more Americans spoke English as well as he does.

In addition to treating his patients with proper nutrition, Dr. Eenfeldt writes the single most popular nutrition blog in the world — and it’s in Swedish, mind you. I’ve tried reading his blog through Google Translate, but the translation tends to produce sentences along the lines of “Do not be alarmed by the rotund of pigs because their dripping is beneficial,” so I gave up. Well, I’m happy to report that Dr. Eenfeldt is now blogging in English on DietDoctor.com.

The other presentations were excellent as well. Dr. Mary Vernon (below), who began treating diabetics with a low-carb diet years ago, spoke about how nutrition affects metabolism.

Dr. Michael Fox (above), a reproductive endocrinologist who’s had amazing success helping women become pregnant by changing their diets, gave a fascinating presentation on how diet produces changes in our hormonal balances. (Bottom line for you ladies: if you want a healthy pregnancy and don’t want to resemble your husband when you’re 70, stop eating refined carbs.)

Jacqueline Eberstein (below), who was Dr. Atkins’ nurse for 30 years, spoke about the causes of weight-loss stalls.  (You can learn more about other low-carb nutrition topics on her web site.)

We had a bit of equipment trouble in the lecture room before Jacqueline’s speech, so she filled the time by telling an amusing story: after her job interview with Dr. Atkins, she told him she didn’t want to work for him because she thought he was a quack. He leaned forward over his desk and asked how soon she could start. Shades of the Seinfeld episode in which George berates George Steinbrenner during his interview with the Yankees, and Steinbrenner responds with “Hire this man!”

Fred Hahn (below) spoke about the many, many benefits of proper strength training. He also conducted training sessions in the gym throughout the week. Several times at dinner, I’d hear someone say something like, “I can barely walk up the stairs. I had a session with Fred today.” Yeah, I know how they feel. I lift weights with Fred’s Slow Burn method, and it works those muscles deep. That’s why I’m stronger now than I was 20 years ago.  I also stopped injuring myself during my workouts.

Dana Carpender (below center, with fellow cruisers Howard and Georgene Harkness) gave a speech titled Behind the Low-Carb Headlines.

Like my speech, Dana’s was about how to spot the nonsense studies that are always popping up in the media. Reading the seminar program, we at first thought we’d be covering the same ground, but it turns out the speeches were complementary; she just happened to hit the areas I didn’t cover in mine and vice versa, and she did an excellent job of taking a particularly bad study (Low-carb diets raise all-cause mortality!) and picking it apart piece by piece.

Finally, there was The Man himself: Jimmy Moore, who gave a speech about finding your passion and following it, whether it’s through blogging, video-making, podcasting, or just spreading the word about real food and real health among your friends. Jimmy was everywhere on the cruise … emceeing the seminars, handling some issues that popped up with the lecture room, making sure the speakers were rotated around the dining room at dinner, and of course, taking the stage in the karaoke bar. I took the stage a few times myself, often to sing duets with members of our group.

For shore excursions, Chareva and I chose to walk around and explore. On Grand Cayman, I noticed the local merchants are happily accommodating tourists who don’t have their diets under control:

See you all next cruise.


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104 thoughts on “Back From The Cruise

  1. Peggy Cihocki

    @Auntie M, my sympathies for your very unsympathetic treatment by the hospital. I would recommend for your reading while pregnant: “Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes need Traditional Food” by Catherine Shanahan, M.D. She’s all about pregnant and soon to be pregnant Mom’s needing to build up nutrients for a healthy baby by ditching sugar, vegetable oils, and other such modern horrors and loading up on traditional fare. She studied some of the healthiest (and most beautiful!) populations past and present and searched for commonalities in their diets that make them and their babies healthy and beautiful generation after generation and discusses these commonalities and why they are important. I haven’t finished it and I’m not pregnant (a little past that at 64), but I’m interested in the field of epigenetics, which features heavily in the book and find much of what I’ve read thus far convincing and not at all incompatible with a low carb approach to nutrition. She was impressed enough with Weston A. Price’s work that she cites it often. Anyway, good luck for a healthy pregnancy and a beautiful baby in November, with no more trips to the hospital!

    Reply
  2. Henrik Bugge

    i hope that LCHF will be a more popular description off low carb diet in USA. Because then you mention the problem, and the solution.
    It is important to learn that natural saturated fat is NOT dangerous. If some people get upset they will start to think too!

    I hope so too. Some people try to do low-carb and low-fat, which isn’t likely to work, since it’s not satisfying.

    Reply
  3. Eric

    Hey Tom
    Thanks for a most interesting site, it looks like you had a fun holiday
    First, one suggestion, maybe have your DVD subtitled in other languages?
    A quick question: do you have any official references to the swedish decision to drop the lipid hypothesis? I author a blog on gastronomy and science (in french), and I have written an article on low carb. Before I write something, I always prefer to have references to any claims (good science…)

    Cheers from Belgium
    Eric

    I’ll ask Dr. Eenfeldt to point me to the government positions he mentioned in his speech.

    Subtitling is expensive, so it’s up to the distributors in each market. It’s been subtitled for TV in Israel, Poland and Turkey, but I don’t have access to those versions. The film was actually over-dubbed for French TV, which means some French actor replaced all my narration and dialog.

    Reply
  4. Henrik Bugge

    i hope that LCHF will be a more popular description off low carb diet in USA. Because then you mention the problem, and the solution.
    It is important to learn that natural saturated fat is NOT dangerous. If some people get upset they will start to think too!

    I hope so too. Some people try to do low-carb and low-fat, which isn’t likely to work, since it’s not satisfying.

    Reply
  5. The Older Brother

    Welcome back!

    Looks like you may need another guest blogger next year — the Diet Doctor’s site just announced that Gary Taubes is going on the 2012 Low Carb Cruise!

    Cheers

    I just woke up to that news. Best start booking next year’s cruise now … I have a feeling Gary’s attendance will bump the size of the group up to 500 or so.

    Reply
  6. Eric

    Hey Tom
    Thanks for a most interesting site, it looks like you had a fun holiday
    First, one suggestion, maybe have your DVD subtitled in other languages?
    A quick question: do you have any official references to the swedish decision to drop the lipid hypothesis? I author a blog on gastronomy and science (in french), and I have written an article on low carb. Before I write something, I always prefer to have references to any claims (good science…)

    Cheers from Belgium
    Eric

    I’ll ask Dr. Eenfeldt to point me to the government positions he mentioned in his speech.

    Subtitling is expensive, so it’s up to the distributors in each market. It’s been subtitled for TV in Israel, Poland and Turkey, but I don’t have access to those versions. The film was actually over-dubbed for French TV, which means some French actor replaced all my narration and dialog.

    Reply
  7. Peggy Cihocki

    Tom, I’m about to embark on the Eades’ Six Week Cure for the Middle Aged Middle because, well, I have that stubborn Middle Aged Middle and would like to lose it. Jerry told me what brand of protein powder you recommended to buy, so I’m all set–except: what’s your take on the DAG oil they recommend as part of the program? I’m kind of suspicious of all vegetable oil products and wonder how necessary this is to the program. I’m not even sure I’d be able to get it as at least one source says it was voluntarily withdrawn from the market. I haven’t looked for it yet. (Just got the book yesterday, so am gathering my stuff first). Can I just stick to coconut oil, butter, and the like?

    I couldn’t find DAG oil locally — not even at the big health-food store — so I skipped it.

    Reply
  8. your older brother

    @Peggy

    You won’t find the DAG oil — it did get yanked off the market. We gave up looking for it and just started the “Cure” without it, too. A while later, I did find a reference to it on Dr. Eades’ bog. He explained that they’d included it because there was some anecdotal evidence that it gave the metabolism a boost, but it wasn’t really a key component.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  9. The Older Brother

    Welcome back!

    Looks like you may need another guest blogger next year — the Diet Doctor’s site just announced that Gary Taubes is going on the 2012 Low Carb Cruise!

    Cheers

    I just woke up to that news. Best start booking next year’s cruise now … I have a feeling Gary’s attendance will bump the size of the group up to 500 or so.

    Reply
  10. Henry p.

    Tom,
    What’s you opinion on sugar alcohols?

    Jackie Eberstein talked about those. They can produce a rise in blood sugar and/or insulin in some people, not to mention gastrointestinal issues. So if you want a little sweet taste here and there, they’re better than sugar, but easy does it.

    Reply
  11. Maria

    Eric, please take a look at the link I posted here yesterday (above). It’s not the authorities’ website but the site of the Swedish doctor who was questioned. She had it translated into English so scroll down some and it’s all there. Perhaps Dr Eenfeldt has a more official link but to start with this should be something to start with… 😉
    Part of the statement:
    “Diarie(Journal) number: 44-112267/2005
    Regarding licensed physician Annika Dahlqvist’s advice concerning “Carbohydrate Tight” diet. In regard to weight reduction and “wellbeing” documented in a background material covering Low-Carbohydrate diet.
    Question: Is this treatment in accordance with science and well-tried experience?
    The answer to this question is yes, reserving the fact that the scientific basis in the form of randomized controlled trials is much narrower than it is regarding diets with a higher content of carbohydrates and that long time trials (> 1 year) is lacking.”

    Reply
  12. Peggy Cihocki

    Tom, I’m about to embark on the Eades’ Six Week Cure for the Middle Aged Middle because, well, I have that stubborn Middle Aged Middle and would like to lose it. Jerry told me what brand of protein powder you recommended to buy, so I’m all set–except: what’s your take on the DAG oil they recommend as part of the program? I’m kind of suspicious of all vegetable oil products and wonder how necessary this is to the program. I’m not even sure I’d be able to get it as at least one source says it was voluntarily withdrawn from the market. I haven’t looked for it yet. (Just got the book yesterday, so am gathering my stuff first). Can I just stick to coconut oil, butter, and the like?

    I couldn’t find DAG oil locally — not even at the big health-food store — so I skipped it.

    Reply
  13. Firebird

    Sounds like a nice time! However, I would have been at odds with Fred Hahn. I’d have a hard time having tell me that I should reduce my 430 lbs. deadlift to 95 pounds and do them Super Slow, and how he thinks my kettlebell training is dangerous.

    More than one way to skin a cat, Fred! 😉

    Actually, Fred’s method involves using heavier weights for single sets.

    Reply
  14. your older brother

    @Peggy

    You won’t find the DAG oil — it did get yanked off the market. We gave up looking for it and just started the “Cure” without it, too. A while later, I did find a reference to it on Dr. Eades’ bog. He explained that they’d included it because there was some anecdotal evidence that it gave the metabolism a boost, but it wasn’t really a key component.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  15. Henry p.

    Tom,
    What’s you opinion on sugar alcohols?

    Jackie Eberstein talked about those. They can produce a rise in blood sugar and/or insulin in some people, not to mention gastrointestinal issues. So if you want a little sweet taste here and there, they’re better than sugar, but easy does it.

    Reply
  16. Maria

    Eric, please take a look at the link I posted here yesterday (above). It’s not the authorities’ website but the site of the Swedish doctor who was questioned. She had it translated into English so scroll down some and it’s all there. Perhaps Dr Eenfeldt has a more official link but to start with this should be something to start with… 😉
    Part of the statement:
    “Diarie(Journal) number: 44-112267/2005
    Regarding licensed physician Annika Dahlqvist’s advice concerning “Carbohydrate Tight” diet. In regard to weight reduction and “wellbeing” documented in a background material covering Low-Carbohydrate diet.
    Question: Is this treatment in accordance with science and well-tried experience?
    The answer to this question is yes, reserving the fact that the scientific basis in the form of randomized controlled trials is much narrower than it is regarding diets with a higher content of carbohydrates and that long time trials (> 1 year) is lacking.”

    Reply
  17. Firebird

    Sounds like a nice time! However, I would have been at odds with Fred Hahn. I’d have a hard time having tell me that I should reduce my 430 lbs. deadlift to 95 pounds and do them Super Slow, and how he thinks my kettlebell training is dangerous.

    More than one way to skin a cat, Fred! 😉

    Actually, Fred’s method involves using heavier weights for single sets.

    Reply
  18. Brian Scott

    Hey Tom, I posted a comment over at Dr. Eenfeldt’s blog because you mentioned you stopped in Grand Cayman, which is where I live. I’m just starting to learn how to cook for myself, since I’d have to eat out all the time otherwise (though you can still find proper food restaurants all over the place, so it’s not so bad). Maybe I could try learn how to extract coconut oil and start frying fish in it. Hmm…

    Now that would be delicious. We find coconut oil is much cheaper online than in grocery stores.

    Reply
  19. Brian Scott

    Hey Tom, I posted a comment over at Dr. Eenfeldt’s blog because you mentioned you stopped in Grand Cayman, which is where I live. I’m just starting to learn how to cook for myself, since I’d have to eat out all the time otherwise (though you can still find proper food restaurants all over the place, so it’s not so bad). Maybe I could try learn how to extract coconut oil and start frying fish in it. Hmm…

    Now that would be delicious. We find coconut oil is much cheaper online than in grocery stores.

    Reply
  20. robin (new zealand)

    My partner’s 28 year old brother tragically drowned in our local flooded river three months ago. His follow-up autopsy report came back last week stating severe narrowing of the coronary artery. He was slim, active, a non smoker, and only an occasional drinker. But, was under a lot of stress, and has always eaten a diet consisting of energy drinks, pasta, daily baking (from his mum), and generally lots of canned/processed/packaged foods. There is no family history of CAD/CHD. Their mum remarked in shock that he ate such a good diet. This is the woman that calls low-fat ice cream ‘healthy’!

    My partner (also slim, active etc) is now undergoing extensive heart checks and has finally seen the light of my diet. Up until now (for over a year now) I have low carbed on my own, while my partner his instisted on buying white bread and adding carbs to every meal, despite him commenting on my weight loss, renewed energy and good mood (no more ‘hanger’ from low blood sugar!). However this week, I showed him some info I got from links supplied on your blog and it has finally touched home. He is now happily low carbing with me, and is sticking to feeding our 2.5 yr old son low carb as well.

    When our doctor told him to stick to a low fat diet and reduce his meat intake, and then said that if his blood results came back with high cholesterol he would give him lowering meds, Jimmy told him he could shove that advice where the sun don’t shine, and perhaps he should spend a bit of time looking at the actual cause of heart disease, not just repeating the same old mantra that clearly does not work, as evidenced by his dead brother’s heart. It has been a tragic way to see the light, but sometimes that is what is it takes to touch home for some.

    I have commented on here a few times in the past, and have been so grateful for the helpful answers by yourself and the other readers. This is quite a long comment, but I just wanted to say thanks for giving me a place to go to find the right answers. Sticking to a diet that goes against the grain can be hard when everyone tells you how dangerous it is. Strangely this is in the same breath as commenting on how good I look and how they wish they had my energy. Its a strange world Tom….I can only hope there are some more long term studies studies that hit the mainstream to turn the tide of this terrible low fat/high sugar fueled world. Maybe I should just move to Sweden!

    The studies are out there, as Dr. Eenfeldt demonstrated in his presentation. Now we just need the old guard to retire. They’re incapable of admitting they got it wrong for 40 years, but eventually they will go away.

    Reply
  21. robin (new zealand)

    My partner’s 28 year old brother tragically drowned in our local flooded river three months ago. His follow-up autopsy report came back last week stating severe narrowing of the coronary artery. He was slim, active, a non smoker, and only an occasional drinker. But, was under a lot of stress, and has always eaten a diet consisting of energy drinks, pasta, daily baking (from his mum), and generally lots of canned/processed/packaged foods. There is no family history of CAD/CHD. Their mum remarked in shock that he ate such a good diet. This is the woman that calls low-fat ice cream ‘healthy’!

    My partner (also slim, active etc) is now undergoing extensive heart checks and has finally seen the light of my diet. Up until now (for over a year now) I have low carbed on my own, while my partner his instisted on buying white bread and adding carbs to every meal, despite him commenting on my weight loss, renewed energy and good mood (no more ‘hanger’ from low blood sugar!). However this week, I showed him some info I got from links supplied on your blog and it has finally touched home. He is now happily low carbing with me, and is sticking to feeding our 2.5 yr old son low carb as well.

    When our doctor told him to stick to a low fat diet and reduce his meat intake, and then said that if his blood results came back with high cholesterol he would give him lowering meds, Jimmy told him he could shove that advice where the sun don’t shine, and perhaps he should spend a bit of time looking at the actual cause of heart disease, not just repeating the same old mantra that clearly does not work, as evidenced by his dead brother’s heart. It has been a tragic way to see the light, but sometimes that is what is it takes to touch home for some.

    I have commented on here a few times in the past, and have been so grateful for the helpful answers by yourself and the other readers. This is quite a long comment, but I just wanted to say thanks for giving me a place to go to find the right answers. Sticking to a diet that goes against the grain can be hard when everyone tells you how dangerous it is. Strangely this is in the same breath as commenting on how good I look and how they wish they had my energy. Its a strange world Tom….I can only hope there are some more long term studies studies that hit the mainstream to turn the tide of this terrible low fat/high sugar fueled world. Maybe I should just move to Sweden!

    The studies are out there, as Dr. Eenfeldt demonstrated in his presentation. Now we just need the old guard to retire. They’re incapable of admitting they got it wrong for 40 years, but eventually they will go away.

    Reply
  22. Peter (Sweden)

    Not all Swedes are 12 feet tall, but on average are we a lot thinner than Americans. We both know why. Not to say we have decapitated the lipid-ghost entirely. The debate is still ongoing and the Carb Cartel has nine lives.

    I have however an entirely different angle. My weight is not a big problem. Blood pressure and pollen allergies have been a major problem though.

    Over the past three years I have found that I can control my blood pressure by being carb-aware and escape my allergies entirely by avoiding all cererals/seeds/nuts from March through May (my pollen season).

    The difference is fundamental. From inhalator, steroids, antihistamines to… Nothing. Nothing but spring-green and joy.

    That makes sense. You’re avoiding the foods that cause inflammation, including inflammation of the respiratory system. Twenty years ago or so, a doctor told me I had a mild case of asthma. Now I don’t.

    Reply
  23. CeeBee

    Regarding the Venus of Willendorf: Right after my son was born I looked exactly like her. It’s the only time in my life I’ve had the body of a goddess. 🙂

    Love this blog Tom! Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  24. Peter (Sweden)

    My testimony is of course by scienticic standards “anecdotal”. This sounds pretty bad, but not really. It is still valid data (if collected). Just not enough and not governed by scientific method. More important NOT COLLECTED BY ANYONE!

    This works for me like a charm, and I am pretty sure I am not alone. There is sound theory behind it. There are immense myths, bad sciences and financial interests against it. Even environmental “green” interests.

    In my firm opinion, mine and other people’s (hopefully) similar experiences will eventually comprise the material necessary for a full and fair investigation of the causes of our modern ailments. Including mine.

    But hey, I’ve cured myself. I’m cool. Anecdotally speaking.

    Anecdotal evidence is still evidence. My own experiences are very persuasive to me personally. If I try a particular diet (low-fat vegetarian, for example) and feel lousy and develop several ailments (which I did) and those ailments go away when I switch to a low-carb / high-fat diet, I no longer care what Dr. Ornish or Dr. Oz recommend.

    Reply
  25. Pam

    http://www.menshealth.com/mhlists/saturated_fat/index.php?cm_mmc=DailyDoseNL-_-05122011-_-HTML-_-dek

    Hopefully the link works.
    For some reason, I get the “Men’s Health” newsletter. Not being a man, sometimes I read it sometimes I don’t. Normally, it talks all about fat & calorie content (yawn!), and what to stay away from in terms of those 2 things, so I was AMAZED to see this article & read their take. Wondering if you (or anyone here!) know anything about Dr. Jeff Volek or Adam Campbell who co-authored the article. (I did notice they didn’t say anything about low carb, but it didn’t seem like ‘the list’ was set up for them to comment on it.)

    Men’s Health runs some good articles on diet now and then. This one (which I linked in the Recommended Reading sidebar a long time ago) was very good:

    http://www.menshealth.com/health/saturated-fat

    Reply
  26. Peter (Sweden)

    Not all Swedes are 12 feet tall, but on average are we a lot thinner than Americans. We both know why. Not to say we have decapitated the lipid-ghost entirely. The debate is still ongoing and the Carb Cartel has nine lives.

    I have however an entirely different angle. My weight is not a big problem. Blood pressure and pollen allergies have been a major problem though.

    Over the past three years I have found that I can control my blood pressure by being carb-aware and escape my allergies entirely by avoiding all cererals/seeds/nuts from March through May (my pollen season).

    The difference is fundamental. From inhalator, steroids, antihistamines to… Nothing. Nothing but spring-green and joy.

    That makes sense. You’re avoiding the foods that cause inflammation, including inflammation of the respiratory system. Twenty years ago or so, a doctor told me I had a mild case of asthma. Now I don’t.

    Reply
  27. CeeBee

    Regarding the Venus of Willendorf: Right after my son was born I looked exactly like her. It’s the only time in my life I’ve had the body of a goddess. 🙂

    Love this blog Tom! Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  28. Peter (Sweden)

    My testimony is of course by scienticic standards “anecdotal”. This sounds pretty bad, but not really. It is still valid data (if collected). Just not enough and not governed by scientific method. More important NOT COLLECTED BY ANYONE!

    This works for me like a charm, and I am pretty sure I am not alone. There is sound theory behind it. There are immense myths, bad sciences and financial interests against it. Even environmental “green” interests.

    In my firm opinion, mine and other people’s (hopefully) similar experiences will eventually comprise the material necessary for a full and fair investigation of the causes of our modern ailments. Including mine.

    But hey, I’ve cured myself. I’m cool. Anecdotally speaking.

    Anecdotal evidence is still evidence. My own experiences are very persuasive to me personally. If I try a particular diet (low-fat vegetarian, for example) and feel lousy and develop several ailments (which I did) and those ailments go away when I switch to a low-carb / high-fat diet, I no longer care what Dr. Ornish or Dr. Oz recommend.

    Reply
  29. Pam

    http://www.menshealth.com/mhlists/saturated_fat/index.php?cm_mmc=DailyDoseNL-_-05122011-_-HTML-_-dek

    Hopefully the link works.
    For some reason, I get the “Men’s Health” newsletter. Not being a man, sometimes I read it sometimes I don’t. Normally, it talks all about fat & calorie content (yawn!), and what to stay away from in terms of those 2 things, so I was AMAZED to see this article & read their take. Wondering if you (or anyone here!) know anything about Dr. Jeff Volek or Adam Campbell who co-authored the article. (I did notice they didn’t say anything about low carb, but it didn’t seem like ‘the list’ was set up for them to comment on it.)

    Men’s Health runs some good articles on diet now and then. This one (which I linked in the Recommended Reading sidebar a long time ago) was very good:

    http://www.menshealth.com/health/saturated-fat

    Reply
  30. Hank Garner

    Tom, thanks for sharing about the cruise. Especially for sharing about Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt. I subscribed to his site and am going to be interviewing him for my podcast in a couple of days. Thanks – Hank

    I’m looking to hearing that one, Hank. He’ll be a great interview.

    Reply
  31. Hank Garner

    Tom, thanks for sharing about the cruise. Especially for sharing about Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt. I subscribed to his site and am going to be interviewing him for my podcast in a couple of days. Thanks – Hank

    I’m looking to hearing that one, Hank. He’ll be a great interview.

    Reply
  32. Andrew

    Hi – I note that you do not look lean. Why is that? I would have assumed if you are eating a low-carb diet that is paleo-centric you’d be lean. However you seem somewhat inflamed and overweight?

    Thanks.

    Ha … similar comments were posted on a lot of Facebook pictures from last year’s cruise: “If low-carb is so great, why are so many of you overweight?” I actually discussed something similar in my speech: A moronic study pointed out that people on low-carb diets are fatter on average than the population as a whole and concluded that low-carb diets must make people fat … demonstrating that the researchers didn’t grasp the fact that thin people don’t go on weight-loss diets of any kind — fat people do. The Facebook trolls were directing those comments at people who had, in many cases, lost more than 100 pounds and kept it off for years. By contrast, in weight-loss clinical trials, “success” is usually defined as losing 10% of the baseline body weight.

    To answer your question, I’m certainly not lean compared to someone with 10% body fat. However, I am definitely lean compared to myself 20 years ago. Like most people who spent much of their lives overweight, I’ve found there’s a limit to how much fat I can lose without either starving, or sacrificing muscle, or both. I once semi-starved myself down to 165 pounds, only to find that I was still a bit thick around the middle, while my muscles were shrinking.

    I’m not sure how you’re coming up with the “inflamed” opinion. Take my Irish skin out in the noon-day sun on Grand Cayman, and I’ll certainly turn a bit reddish. Back in my grain-eating days, I did have some inflammation-related ailments, including asthma, arthritis and psoriasis. Those are all gone now.

    Reply
  33. Andrew

    Hi – I note that you do not look lean. Why is that? I would have assumed if you are eating a low-carb diet that is paleo-centric you’d be lean. However you seem somewhat inflamed and overweight?

    Thanks.

    Ha … similar comments were posted on a lot of Facebook pictures from last year’s cruise: “If low-carb is so great, why are so many of you overweight?” I actually discussed something similar in my speech: A moronic study pointed out that people on low-carb diets are fatter on average than the population as a whole and concluded that low-carb diets must make people fat … demonstrating that the researchers didn’t grasp the fact that thin people don’t go on weight-loss diets of any kind — fat people do. The Facebook trolls were directing those comments at people who had, in many cases, lost more than 100 pounds and kept it off for years. By contrast, in weight-loss clinical trials, “success” is usually defined as losing 10% of the baseline body weight.

    To answer your question, I’m certainly not lean compared to someone with 10% body fat. However, I am definitely lean compared to myself 20 years ago. Like most people who spent much of their lives overweight, I’ve found there’s a limit to how much fat I can lose without either starving, or sacrificing muscle, or both. I once semi-starved myself down to 165 pounds, only to find that I was still a bit thick around the middle, while my muscles were shrinking.

    I’m not sure how you’re coming up with the “inflamed” opinion. Take my Irish skin out in the noon-day sun on Grand Cayman, and I’ll certainly turn a bit reddish. Back in my grain-eating days, I did have some inflammation-related ailments, including asthma, arthritis and psoriasis. Those are all gone now.

    Reply
  34. Erica

    Andrew, why must everyone look ‘lean?’ There are many different body types in our gene pool, and not everyone is extremely thin, even on low-carb. As well, those of us who have suffered the Western SAD diet for years may never get lean, even once we lose the excess weight through low-carbing and eliminating those foods which cause us inflammation. The most important thing is that we are healthy (with normalized blood sugars and lipid profiles, etc.) and happy. I agree with Chareva: it’s time for a nap and some cheese, too.

    Reply
  35. Erica

    Andrew, why must everyone look ‘lean?’ There are many different body types in our gene pool, and not everyone is extremely thin, even on low-carb. As well, those of us who have suffered the Western SAD diet for years may never get lean, even once we lose the excess weight through low-carbing and eliminating those foods which cause us inflammation. The most important thing is that we are healthy (with normalized blood sugars and lipid profiles, etc.) and happy. I agree with Chareva: it’s time for a nap and some cheese, too.

    Reply
  36. TonyNZ

    @ Andrew

    He’s certainly not as overweight as that Brownell guy charged with solving the States’ obesity problem.

    Reply
  37. TonyNZ

    @ Andrew

    He’s certainly not as overweight as that Brownell guy charged with solving the States’ obesity problem.

    Reply

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