This Is What We’re Up Against … Scholastic Version

My wife recently tore a page out of Scholastic Parent & Child magazine and left it on my desk. As I sipped my morning coffee, I read a headline — Is Sugar to Blame? — with the subtitle There are many misconceptions about type 2 diabetes.  Below that was a brief article in Myth vs. Truth format.

You already know what’s coming, don’t you? That’s right:  an article exonerating sugar, along with other nonsense. Look at these three Myth-Truth entries and ask yourself if perhaps they should’ve caused some cognitive dissonance in the writer’s brain:

Myth:  Type 2 diabetes only affects adults.
Truth:  The disease used to be called adult-onset diabetes because it mainly occurred in people over 40. Not anymore. In the past two decades, the number of children and adolescents diagnosed has been rising steadily.

Myth:  It’s caused by eating too much sugar.
Truth:  A combination of genetics and lifestyle factors cause type 2 diabetes. But many sugary foods can lead to being overweight, which increases risk.

Myth:  Only overweight people develop type 2 diabetes.
Truth:  People of normal weight can develop the disease.

So let’s see if we can follow the logic here:  This disease used to pretty much only show up in people over 40.  Now it’s rising rapidly among kids.  But it’s not caused by eating too much sugar; it’s caused by genetics and/or being overweight.  And by the way, plenty of people who aren’t overweight also develop the disease.

Conclusion:  Our genetics must’ve undergone one hell of a mutation in the past 20 years. Either that, or some mysterious change in “lifestyle factors” caused a rapid rise in diabetes among teens and adolescents. Perhaps we’ll eventually learn that video games or just-above-the-butt tattoos are to blame. Trouble is, I can’t imagine the biological mechanism by which either of those would cause diabetes, and I’m pretty sure the people running the genome project would’ve noticed a sudden genetic mutation.

So I believe if our brains are functioning, we’re stuck looking for an alternate conclusion.  Here’s mine:  whoever wrote this garbage for Scholastic Parent & Child doesn’t have a flippin’ clue.

Correlation doesn’t prove causation, but I sincerely doubt the fact that type 2 diabetes has risen right along with our consumption of high-fructose corn syrup is a mere coincidence.  (Oh, excuse me … it’s “corn sugar” now, not high-fructose corn syrup.)  And in this case, we can definitely imagine the biological mechanism that leads to diabetes. For that, we’ll turn to a paper co-authored by Dr. Richard Johnson. (See his speech on fructose and uric acid in this post.)  Here are a few quotes from the opening of the paper:

We propose that excessive fructose intake (>50 g/d) may be one of the underlying etiologies of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The primary sources of fructose are sugar (sucrose) and high fructose corn syrup. First, fructose intake correlates closely with the rate of diabetes worldwide. Second, unlike other sugars, the ingestion of excessive fructose induces features of metabolic syndrome in both laboratory animals and humans.

Beginning with studies in the 1950s, it was recognized that diets high in sucrose can rapidly induce features of metabolic syndrome in rats, including hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, weight gain, and hyperuricemia. Further studies documented that these metabolic changes were due to the fructose content.

Later in the paper, Johnson and his co-authors present details on the biochemistry involved.  Don’t worry about wrapping your brain around all this stuff; the point is that they’re citing clinical evidence and chemistry, not simply blaming unspecified “lifestyle factors.”

Moreover, there is evidence that fructose-induced insulin resistance is mediated by fructose-induced hyperuricemia. Lowering uric acid using either xanthine oxidase inhibitors or uricosuric agents can prevent the development of metabolic syndrome induced by fructose. At least two mechanisms may account for these findings. First, it is known that insulin-mediated endothelial nitric oxide (NO) release can account for one third of insulin’s action possibly by increasing blood flow to skeletal muscle and peripheral tissues and enhancing glucose uptake. Mice incapable of generating endothelial NO develop full features of metabolic syndrome. Uric acid inhibits endothelial NO in cell culture and in the animal, and the mechanisms involve uric acid-induced oxidant production, C-reactive protein production, stimulation of arginase, and direct scavenging. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia in humans is also associated with endothelial dysfunction, and lowering uric acid with allopurinol improves endothelial function in diabetics. The second proposed mechanism is by a direct effect of uric acid on the adipocyte. There is evidence that insulin resistance is mediated in part by inflammation and oxidative stress within the adipocyte. Sautin et al. have recently shown that uric acid induces this phenotype in cultured adipocytes. In addition, Cheung et al. reported that xanthine oxidoreductase knockout mice fail to become fat due to a defect in adipogenesis. These studies therefore implicate xanthine oxidase and uric acid in metabolic syndrome.

Bottom line:  there’s strong evidence that excess fructose causes the body to produce excess uric acid, whicn in turn induces insulin resistance, among other horrors.

With all the research out there, Scholastic Parent & Child tells parents not to blame sugar (and HFCS) for the rise in childhood diabetes?  You’ve got to be kidding me.

My first thought was that they must’ve gotten their talking points from that creepy lady at the Corn Refiners Association.  Then I noticed the sources listed at the end of the article:  The American Diabetes Association the National Diabetes Education Program.

Well, of course … we’re talking about the same people who explain in their literature how carbohydrates rapidly turn into blood sugar, then tell diabetics to be sure to eat lots of carbohydrates.

The article also suggested that parents who are worried about diabetes should visit diabetes.com for more information. So I did. Here are a few gems from that site:

When you have type 2 diabetes, high levels of sugar build up in your blood. This can lead to serious health complications. That’s why controlling your blood sugar is key to managing diabetes.

Ah, very good so far. Of course, you’ll next explain to diabetics how to adopt a diet that will keep their blood sugar low, right?

There’s no such thing as a “diabetic diet.” Still, you may be confused about what to eat. Here’s the low-down on some common misunderstandings about foods:

Carbohydrates. Some meal plans want you to count grams of carbohydrates (sugar and starch). Your dietitian can help you learn to count carbohydrates.

Sugar. Most experts say small amounts of sugar are fine, as long as they are part of your meal plan.

Oh, I see … if you’re a diabetic and plan to eat sugar, it’s fine. Your body says to itself, “Well, looky here … this sugar was listed right there on the day’s schedule, so I won’t bother dumping it into the bloodstream. I only do that with sugar I didn’t expect.”

Healthy eating, along with medicine if prescribed and regular physical activity, can help lower your blood sugar. Eating healthy is key to reducing your risk of health complications from diabetes.

Changing the way you eat can be hard. So make changes slowly. Start by adding high-fiber foods including fruits and vegetables. These fiber-rich foods may help stop spikes in blood sugar. Eat less meat and fewer sweets.

Meat is bad (no explanation as to why), sweets are bad (unless you plan on eating them), but other foods that jack up your blood sugar are great:   In other sections, the diabetes.com site recommends six servings per day of low-fat breads, beans, crackers, tortillas or pretzels, plus two to four servings of fruit — those would be providing you with fructose, of course. 

So there you have it.  Sugar doesn’t cause diabetes, and if you develop diabetes, you should base your diet on foods that jack up your blood sugar … but be sure to check your blood-sugar level, and if it goes too high, see your doctor.  So say the experts at diabetes.com, the American Diabetes Association, and Scholastic Parent & Child magazine.

This is what we’re up against.  I feel sorry for well-intentioned parents who believe this nonsense.


If you enjoy my posts, please consider a small donation to the Fat Head Kids GoFundMe campaign.
Share

109 thoughts on “This Is What We’re Up Against … Scholastic Version

  1. Be

    I love you Tom! SHOUT it at the top of your lungs!

    I was reading about the San Francisco law banning happy meals in the USA Today quoting the Mental Genius, San Francisco Supervisor Eric Mar, who sponsored this idiotic fascist “Healthy Meals Incentive Ordinance”, just today, that “Childhood obesity rates have tripled in the 30 years since the introduction of the Happy Meal” .

    Other associations? It seems so blatantly obvious that any sane person would quip: “It’s about then that the country started listening to a*#hole government officials like you to guide their diets.”

    Bingo. And a whole lot more kids are fed according to government guidlines every day than go to McDonald’s every day … or even once per week.

  2. Be

    I love you Tom! SHOUT it at the top of your lungs!

    I was reading about the San Francisco law banning happy meals in the USA Today quoting the Mental Genius, San Francisco Supervisor Eric Mar, who sponsored this idiotic fascist “Healthy Meals Incentive Ordinance”, just today, that “Childhood obesity rates have tripled in the 30 years since the introduction of the Happy Meal” .

    Other associations? It seems so blatantly obvious that any sane person would quip: “It’s about then that the country started listening to a*#hole government officials like you to guide their diets.”

    Bingo. And a whole lot more kids are fed according to government guidlines every day than go to McDonald’s every day … or even once per week.

  3. Dan

    Check out more “myths” about diabetes from the ADA. Some are true and others need to be busted. I do agree that portion size is important for starchy foods — a portion size of ZERO.

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-myths/

    I also say an ADA “remake” of Thanksgiving dinner. Plenty of carbs, but no butter. As long as you eliminate that root of all evil — saturated fat, you’re okay.

    http://forecast.diabetes.org/magazine/features/remaking-thanksgiving-menus?utm_source=Homepage&utm_medium=FeatureSlider1&utm_content=Forecast-Thanksgiving-Nov2010&utm_campaign=DF

    As Mike Eades would say, Jesus wept.

  4. Sarah

    Reading that a single serving of Frosted mini wheats has 48g of carb in it is enough to give me a heart attack.

    They market the stuff to KIDS to keep them FULL and FOCUSED with FIBER too.

    *Grumble grumble avocado burger grumble*

    I second that grumble.

  5. Sarah

    Reading that a single serving of Frosted mini wheats has 48g of carb in it is enough to give me a heart attack.

    They market the stuff to KIDS to keep them FULL and FOCUSED with FIBER too.

    *Grumble grumble avocado burger grumble*

    I second that grumble.

  6. Cynthia

    I see similar such nonsense all over. Most recently, there was an inane article about weight loss myths on the Livestrong site that got a bunch of comments about how it was useless and a waste of time to read. Unfortunately, these little publications are filled with quick thoughtless articles written by free-lancers who are too often unqualified and uneducated. They can’t be bothered to actually do any research (probably aren’t paid much either) and simply parrot or plagiarize some other article they read. Hence the misinformation gets recycled ad nauseum. Everyone “knows” this stuff, so it requires no thought or fact-checking to produce.

    Exactly. Who would ever fact-check “saturated fat clogs your arteries” ?

  7. pierogi

    Tom!
    “Fat head” can’t be played in Australia from my dvd…some sort of technical incompatability.
    Love your blog and your manner is sidesplitting…you are cross between The proffesor & Mutley and several other charaters of the 50s/60s.

    Is it the U.S. release from Morningstar? I’m guessing it’s a region-code restriction. I’ve heard there are ways around those, but never tried.

    We’re working on making the film available overseas soon through self-distribution.

  8. pierogi

    Tom!
    “Fat head” can’t be played in Australia from my dvd…some sort of technical incompatability.
    Love your blog and your manner is sidesplitting…you are cross between The proffesor & Mutley and several other charaters of the 50s/60s.

    Is it the U.S. release from Morningstar? I’m guessing it’s a region-code restriction. I’ve heard there are ways around those, but never tried.

    We’re working on making the film available overseas soon through self-distribution.

  9. pierogi

    Mars movies was the supplier Tom.

    Hmmm … our only DVD distributor is Morningstar, and their territory is U.S. and Canada. I found a MovieMars.com site, looked up Fat Head, and it’s clearly the U.S./region 1 release. Is this the store?

    http://www.moviemars.com/i/063634022190_Fat_Head.htm

    Check the fine print on the back near the bottom of the case. Do you see a reference to Morningstar? If so, I’m wondering why anyone would be selling a region 1 DVD in Australia. That would pretty much guarantee compatibility issues.

  10. Be

    I love you Tom! SHOUT it at the top of your lungs!

    I was reading about the San Francisco law banning happy meals in the USA Today quoting the Mental Genius, San Francisco Supervisor Eric Mar, who sponsored this idiotic fascist “Healthy Meals Incentive Ordinance”, just today, that “Childhood obesity rates have tripled in the 30 years since the introduction of the Happy Meal” .

    Other associations? It seems so blatantly obvious that any sane person would quip: “It’s about then that the country started listening to a*#hole government officials like you to guide their diets.”

    Bingo. And a whole lot more kids are fed according to government guidlines every day than go to McDonald’s every day … or even once per week.

  11. Sarah

    Reading that a single serving of Frosted mini wheats has 48g of carb in it is enough to give me a heart attack.

    They market the stuff to KIDS to keep them FULL and FOCUSED with FIBER too.

    *Grumble grumble avocado burger grumble*

    I second that grumble.

  12. pierogi

    Tom!
    “Fat head” can’t be played in Australia from my dvd…some sort of technical incompatability.
    Love your blog and your manner is sidesplitting…you are cross between The proffesor & Mutley and several other charaters of the 50s/60s.

    Is it the U.S. release from Morningstar? I’m guessing it’s a region-code restriction. I’ve heard there are ways around those, but never tried.

    We’re working on making the film available overseas soon through self-distribution.

  13. pierogi

    Mars movies was the supplier Tom.

    Hmmm … our only DVD distributor is Morningstar, and their territory is U.S. and Canada. I found a MovieMars.com site, looked up Fat Head, and it’s clearly the U.S./region 1 release. Is this the store?

    http://www.moviemars.com/i/063634022190_Fat_Head.htm

    Check the fine print on the back near the bottom of the case. Do you see a reference to Morningstar? If so, I’m wondering why anyone would be selling a region 1 DVD in Australia. That would pretty much guarantee compatibility issues.

  14. Amanda

    This is exactly the same moronic nonsense spouted by Diabetes UK (and every other health ‘professional’) over here. How can anyone be so brainless as to believe that all this ‘information’ is intelligent and makes any sense? I recently did a university nutrition course, and the only way to pass it is to repeat this stuff like a zombie, and presumably believe it. If you have a brain and question it, you won’t pass the course. Thus only people stupid enough to repeat this crap like a zombie will ever pass a nutrition course.. which explains why all qualified nutritionists are braindead zombies.. anyone who isn’t a moron won’t pass the course and get the qualification.
    The DVD got to UK super-quick, looking forward to watching it again. Thanks, Tom.

    Wow, that was fast. Let me know if it works in your player; we’re going to make Fat Head available across the pond using the same format.

  15. Laurie

    Plagarizing and altering the scary chant from ‘The Wizard of Oz’— it’s not ‘Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My’ but, how about
    Carbies, and Wheaties and Fruit OH MY!

  16. Mark. Gooley

    I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a bit over forty years ago. I have been going to the same endocrinologist for the past 13 years or so. Last visit I had my lowest hemoglobin A1c since I became his patient. He’s pleased with the numbers but shocked that I’m trying to keep carbohydrate intake under 30 grams a day and live mostly off fat; my triglycerides are finally within normal range as well, and my cholesterol only slightly above normal even though I have not taken a statin in six months. Sigh.

    I’ve tried living off whole grains. The fiber does not prevent blood sugar spikes, merely delays them a little. The advice in the Scholastic article is exactly what I tried for over 25 years to follow — and my rewards have been persistently high blood sugar, neuropathy, retinopathy, impotence, and (from attempts over the last ten years at tight control through frequent blood sugar tests and aggressive use of extra insulin shots) obesity. I hope to live long enough to be part of a class-action suit against the American Diabetes Association. Also I need to stop merely discarding the junk mail suggesting that I re-join and get Diabetes Forecast again, and instead write a well-reasoned, polite, and scathing letter…

    That’s why these goofs make me so angry. How many people like you have suffered needlessly while trying to do the “right” thing?

  17. Dan

    Back for more.

    “Start by adding high-fiber foods including fruits and vegetables. These fiber-rich foods may help stop spikes in blood sugar.” As someone already pointed out, this is a weasil word. MAY doesn’t mean WILL.

    With the help of my glucose meter, I’ve found that non-starchy veg don’t cause blood sugar spikes but high sugar fruit, or too much fruit does. I’m surprised they didn’t throw in whole grains. Fiber does little to reduce blood sugar spikes unless it more than 40% or 50% of carb grams. All this sounds good in theory, but they obviously don’t bother to test their theories.

    They probably don’t want to test their theories and risk learning just how wrong they are.

  18. Dana

    The ‘sugar is ok’ message drives me crazy! Our church has been conducting a ‘wellness’ campaign to help members lose weight and prevent diabetes. They are offering ‘healthy’ alternatives to the usual donuts and cookies after the service. I have taken a look at the ‘healthy’ alternatives. They include gummy fruit snacks, graham cracker snacks, white bagels, 12 ounce containers of 100% juice, oranges, and bananas. No kidding. I guess it’s ok, as long as members plan to eat this stuff, right?

    That’s right. According to the ADA, the key is to PLAN to eat sugar.

  19. Amanda

    This is exactly the same moronic nonsense spouted by Diabetes UK (and every other health ‘professional’) over here. How can anyone be so brainless as to believe that all this ‘information’ is intelligent and makes any sense? I recently did a university nutrition course, and the only way to pass it is to repeat this stuff like a zombie, and presumably believe it. If you have a brain and question it, you won’t pass the course. Thus only people stupid enough to repeat this crap like a zombie will ever pass a nutrition course.. which explains why all qualified nutritionists are braindead zombies.. anyone who isn’t a moron won’t pass the course and get the qualification.
    The DVD got to UK super-quick, looking forward to watching it again. Thanks, Tom.

    Wow, that was fast. Let me know if it works in your player; we’re going to make Fat Head available across the pond using the same format.

  20. Rocky

    I saw my personal physician last week and he and I were discussing the status of the medical industry. He became pensive for a moment and said, “You know, I’m not really allowed to make my patients well. According to my industry and my peers I’m supposed to just put Band-Aids on my patients to keep them sufficiently well that they continue working and paying for medical treatment. I’m not supposed to be about true health and prevention. That isn’t the type of medicine I want to practice.”

    I responded that his attitude was exactly why he was my physician.

    Wow. The state of his profession must really bother him.

  21. Laurie

    Plagarizing and altering the scary chant from ‘The Wizard of Oz’— it’s not ‘Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My’ but, how about
    Carbies, and Wheaties and Fruit OH MY!

  22. Mark. Gooley

    I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a bit over forty years ago. I have been going to the same endocrinologist for the past 13 years or so. Last visit I had my lowest hemoglobin A1c since I became his patient. He’s pleased with the numbers but shocked that I’m trying to keep carbohydrate intake under 30 grams a day and live mostly off fat; my triglycerides are finally within normal range as well, and my cholesterol only slightly above normal even though I have not taken a statin in six months. Sigh.

    I’ve tried living off whole grains. The fiber does not prevent blood sugar spikes, merely delays them a little. The advice in the Scholastic article is exactly what I tried for over 25 years to follow — and my rewards have been persistently high blood sugar, neuropathy, retinopathy, impotence, and (from attempts over the last ten years at tight control through frequent blood sugar tests and aggressive use of extra insulin shots) obesity. I hope to live long enough to be part of a class-action suit against the American Diabetes Association. Also I need to stop merely discarding the junk mail suggesting that I re-join and get Diabetes Forecast again, and instead write a well-reasoned, polite, and scathing letter…

    That’s why these goofs make me so angry. How many people like you have suffered needlessly while trying to do the “right” thing?

  23. Dan

    Back for more.

    “Start by adding high-fiber foods including fruits and vegetables. These fiber-rich foods may help stop spikes in blood sugar.” As someone already pointed out, this is a weasil word. MAY doesn’t mean WILL.

    With the help of my glucose meter, I’ve found that non-starchy veg don’t cause blood sugar spikes but high sugar fruit, or too much fruit does. I’m surprised they didn’t throw in whole grains. Fiber does little to reduce blood sugar spikes unless it more than 40% or 50% of carb grams. All this sounds good in theory, but they obviously don’t bother to test their theories.

    They probably don’t want to test their theories and risk learning just how wrong they are.

  24. Dana

    The ‘sugar is ok’ message drives me crazy! Our church has been conducting a ‘wellness’ campaign to help members lose weight and prevent diabetes. They are offering ‘healthy’ alternatives to the usual donuts and cookies after the service. I have taken a look at the ‘healthy’ alternatives. They include gummy fruit snacks, graham cracker snacks, white bagels, 12 ounce containers of 100% juice, oranges, and bananas. No kidding. I guess it’s ok, as long as members plan to eat this stuff, right?

    That’s right. According to the ADA, the key is to PLAN to eat sugar.

  25. labrat

    Have you seen this study yet? I can find the full version without paying for it.

    http://www.nature.com/ejcn/journal/v64/n11/full/ejcn2010152a.html

    Parental characteristics and physical activity were associated with both obesity and eating patterns. Children adhering to a ‘junk/convenient’ eating pattern had a significantly lower likelihood of being overweight (aOR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4, 0.9), whereas children adhering to a ‘varied Norwegian’ or a ‘dieting’ eating pattern had a significantly higher likelihood of being overweight (respective values: aOR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.3, 3.2; aOR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.4, 3.4). No association with overweight was seen for a ‘snacking pattern’.

    Conclusions:

    The main finding was that, although family characteristics influenced both the prevalence of overweight and overall dietary behaviour, independent associations were evident between eating patterns and overweight, indicating parental modification of the diets of overweight children.

    From what I can gather they found that kids who ate so-called healthy diets were fatter and their conclusion was that parents of fat kids made “healthier” choices for their kids. Not of course that “healthy diets” made for fatter kids.

    Looks as if they simply found that fat people are more likely to go on diets, even kids.

  26. Ellex

    Hey Tom,

    You might want to check your Google Ads filter. Right now it’s displaying an advert for SweetSuprise.com – the “HFCS is good for you” site.

    Or is this metahumor?

    Yeah, we get some weird ones … SweetSurprise, bariatric surgery, etc. Google places the ads and I don’t know how to change them.

  27. Rocky

    I saw my personal physician last week and he and I were discussing the status of the medical industry. He became pensive for a moment and said, “You know, I’m not really allowed to make my patients well. According to my industry and my peers I’m supposed to just put Band-Aids on my patients to keep them sufficiently well that they continue working and paying for medical treatment. I’m not supposed to be about true health and prevention. That isn’t the type of medicine I want to practice.”

    I responded that his attitude was exactly why he was my physician.

    Wow. The state of his profession must really bother him.

  28. Ellex

    Hey Tom,

    You might want to check your Google Ads filter. Right now it’s displaying an advert for SweetSuprise.com – the “HFCS is good for you” site.

    Or is this metahumor?

    Yeah, we get some weird ones … SweetSurprise, bariatric surgery, etc. Google places the ads and I don’t know how to change them.

  29. pierogi

    Hey Tom
    Iam a technological moron.
    Re: Fat head via Marsmovies to Australia. Its silly to presume anyone knows what they are doing…I should have read the fine print.
    I will order one from your site (blush)..feel guilty about not pushing micro-business your way.

    Sorry you bought a DVD you can’t use. We’ll have an all-region DVD ready to ship outside the U.S. soon. We’re just working out the details with a DVD replicator.

  30. Justin

    That comment about region codes. You can sometimes change the frimware of your dvd drive/player to be region 0 i think is everything. I also wondered if you could provide a streaming version that can be viewed in other countries. Of course, I don’t know what streaming content you can get in other countries…

    We’re working on distributing a version without a region code.

  31. julianne

    Looks like they got the info directly from the Institute of Grocery Distribution:

    “Consumers do not understand the role of sugars in the diet, according to a new report from IGD that suggests food businesses can improve the information they provide to aid understanding.

    Reducing added sugar is part of a major drive towards offering healthier food and beverage products, and the main public health messages revolve around managing energy intake and dental health. However as well as providing energy and carbohydrate, they also perform technological functions in foods, such as texture, colour, acting as a preservative and improving palatability.

    The new report from the Institute of Grocery Distribution (IGD), called Sugars: Improving information and messages to consumers, is intended to help food manufacturers clarify messages to consumers about the role of sugars in the diet, and to use appropriate terms for describing sugars on food and beverage products.
    It also gives some messages that the food industry may find useful when developing products or resources:

    * Brown colours and flavours come from raw sugar or are added back
    * Sugar is naturally white, it is not bleached
    * Sugars provide 4 calories per gram, less than half the calories of fat. The GDA for sugars is 90g
    * Sugar does not cause diabetes and can be eaten as part of a healthy balanced diet (according to current scientific evidence)
    * Sugars do not cause behavioural problems in children (according to current scientific evidence)”

    http://www.foodnavigator.com/Financial-Industry/Dispel-consumer-myths-around-added-sugars-IGD

    Makes me wonder where the ADA gets its funding.

  32. pierogi

    Hey Tom
    Iam a technological moron.
    Re: Fat head via Marsmovies to Australia. Its silly to presume anyone knows what they are doing…I should have read the fine print.
    I will order one from your site (blush)..feel guilty about not pushing micro-business your way.

    Sorry you bought a DVD you can’t use. We’ll have an all-region DVD ready to ship outside the U.S. soon. We’re just working out the details with a DVD replicator.

  33. Justin

    That comment about region codes. You can sometimes change the frimware of your dvd drive/player to be region 0 i think is everything. I also wondered if you could provide a streaming version that can be viewed in other countries. Of course, I don’t know what streaming content you can get in other countries…

    We’re working on distributing a version without a region code.

  34. julianne

    Looks like they got the info directly from the Institute of Grocery Distribution:

    “Consumers do not understand the role of sugars in the diet, according to a new report from IGD that suggests food businesses can improve the information they provide to aid understanding.

    Reducing added sugar is part of a major drive towards offering healthier food and beverage products, and the main public health messages revolve around managing energy intake and dental health. However as well as providing energy and carbohydrate, they also perform technological functions in foods, such as texture, colour, acting as a preservative and improving palatability.

    The new report from the Institute of Grocery Distribution (IGD), called Sugars: Improving information and messages to consumers, is intended to help food manufacturers clarify messages to consumers about the role of sugars in the diet, and to use appropriate terms for describing sugars on food and beverage products.
    It also gives some messages that the food industry may find useful when developing products or resources:

    * Brown colours and flavours come from raw sugar or are added back
    * Sugar is naturally white, it is not bleached
    * Sugars provide 4 calories per gram, less than half the calories of fat. The GDA for sugars is 90g
    * Sugar does not cause diabetes and can be eaten as part of a healthy balanced diet (according to current scientific evidence)
    * Sugars do not cause behavioural problems in children (according to current scientific evidence)”

    http://www.foodnavigator.com/Financial-Industry/Dispel-consumer-myths-around-added-sugars-IGD

    Makes me wonder where the ADA gets its funding.

  35. DAOWAce

    I was exposed to a clip of your movie from Nutiva (big fat lies) and jumped to your site. Needless to say, I will be watching yet another documentary, even though me watching it won’t help spread the word about health awareness in America, but it’ll still make me feel just a bit better.. and angrier at the government.

    Anyway, about this blog post, I’ll be linking it to my grandmother who has diabetes as it’s an interesting, albeit anger producing read.

    Most likely you’re already aware, but for commenters who aren’t: http://www.knowthecause.com

  36. Robbie Trinidad

    Oh God. We’re soooo screwed.

    http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/nation/metro-manila/11/09/10/us-sponsored-feeding-program-launched-pasig

    “The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) donated 680 metric tons of non-fat dry milk for the (milk-feeding) program.”

    “The donation was processed into ultra high temperature (UHT) chocolate milk and fortified biscuits by the Republic Flour Mills Corporation.”

    So basically, to help feed 85,000 starving kids here in the Philippines, the USDA donates milk with the fat content taken out, and a local food company adds SUGAR to it.

    Good grief. Why don’t we just bomb them and do the damage all at once?

  37. Lori

    It’s funny how conventional wisdom says that eating fat makes you gain fat, and eating cholesterol raises your cholesterol, but eating sugar doesn’t raise your blood sugar.

    I hadn’t thought of it that way. Quite a disconnect.

  38. DAOWAce

    I was exposed to a clip of your movie from Nutiva (big fat lies) and jumped to your site. Needless to say, I will be watching yet another documentary, even though me watching it won’t help spread the word about health awareness in America, but it’ll still make me feel just a bit better.. and angrier at the government.

    Anyway, about this blog post, I’ll be linking it to my grandmother who has diabetes as it’s an interesting, albeit anger producing read.

    Most likely you’re already aware, but for commenters who aren’t: http://www.knowthecause.com

  39. Namine

    Instead of that junk lets have our kids have some of the stuff they call “junk”

    http://www.brgr.com/index.cfm

    if youre ever up here in NYC have a try, its pretty great. except for the whole wheat bun thing.

    Grass-fed burgers, now you’re talking.

  40. Robbie Trinidad

    Oh God. We’re soooo screwed.

    http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/nation/metro-manila/11/09/10/us-sponsored-feeding-program-launched-pasig

    “The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) donated 680 metric tons of non-fat dry milk for the (milk-feeding) program.”

    “The donation was processed into ultra high temperature (UHT) chocolate milk and fortified biscuits by the Republic Flour Mills Corporation.”

    So basically, to help feed 85,000 starving kids here in the Philippines, the USDA donates milk with the fat content taken out, and a local food company adds SUGAR to it.

    Good grief. Why don’t we just bomb them and do the damage all at once?

  41. Amanda

    Hi Tom, The DVD worked fine in the UK, we projected it onto our 8 feet wide screen!

    That’s what I wanted to hear. Eight feet … ? Wow.

  42. Debbie

    As a T2 diabetic myself this stuff makes me wild. I especially get chills reading about the so-called “food” they try to force on diabetics in hospitals! I would rather fast than eat that stuff. Luckily the two medical procedures I have had in the last three years were both same-day stuff so I didn’t have to eat anything in the hospital. But I’ve told my family members if I get stuck in the hospital they have to smuggle me in cans of sardines if I don’t have time to pack any for myself.

    When my grandson was born 14 months ago my DiL was so disgusted with the hospital food that she didn’t eat a bite of it the entire 48 hours she was there – but we (various family members) all brought food in to her. MY contribution was burgers from: http://www.elevationburger.com/EB.php : 100% organic grass-fed beef topped with real cheddar cheese, not the processed “cheese food” most fast food places put on their burgers.

    For breakfast this morning I had coffee with heavy cream, cooked up a few slices of bacon, then fried a couple eggs in the bacon grease, and topped them with some shredded cheddar cheese. My 1-hour PP blood sugar reading was 107. Try *THAT* on your sugary cereal, fruit and skimmed milk breakfast. 🙂

    The meals the ADA recommends would propel my glucose to 180 at least.

  43. Lori

    It’s funny how conventional wisdom says that eating fat makes you gain fat, and eating cholesterol raises your cholesterol, but eating sugar doesn’t raise your blood sugar.

    I hadn’t thought of it that way. Quite a disconnect.

  44. gollum

    Yeah, we do not know what causes diabetes (oh rly?), but it is not contagious!
    Guess I must forget about these hypotheses I read about C. albicans causing sugar addition. Although that is very much a side issue, since it’s pretty much a hen-egg-problem even if it is true.

    I hear that Linux DVD players ignore region codes. This may or may not be technically legal in your country. (I also hear no one cares.)

    High school dropouts have higher rates of crime. Let us lower crime by handing out more diplomas!
    It stops being funny when it becomes an actual headline.
    Let us get away from individual cases of these. WHAT, I mean, WHAT is wrong? How hard is it to understand that correlation is not causation? Do you need a special gift to grasp that?

    We’ll have a DVD without region codes ready soon. I also saw that there is more crime in neighborhoods with pawn shops. Apparently we need to get rid of those to reduce crime.

  45. Namine

    Instead of that junk lets have our kids have some of the stuff they call “junk”

    http://www.brgr.com/index.cfm

    if youre ever up here in NYC have a try, its pretty great. except for the whole wheat bun thing.

    Grass-fed burgers, now you’re talking.

  46. Amanda

    Hi Tom, The DVD worked fine in the UK, we projected it onto our 8 feet wide screen!

    That’s what I wanted to hear. Eight feet … ? Wow.

Comments are closed.