How To Become Stupid In 5 Minutes

      86 Comments on How To Become Stupid In 5 Minutes

You may have already seen this video, How To Become Diabetic In Six Hours, produced by a doctor who’s selling yet another low-fat, Ornish-style diet. I don’t expect any low-carb types to be fooled, but give it a look just for fun and then we’ll analyze the bologna.

A quick recap in case you couldn’t play the video: Dr. Delgoofy tells us that dietary fat causes insulin resistance and diabetes. To prove the point, he swallows a half-cup of olive oil and – horrors! – his triglycerides nearly double. Then he consumes a big ol’ sandwich and some pizza and – double horrors! – his triglycerides rise to 214, and his glucose shoots up to 131. This, he assures us, proves that dietary fat causes diabetes.

As I often say about journalists after reading slanted news stories, I can’t tell if this guy is intentionally dishonest or merely stupid.

Let’s start with that shocking rise in triglycerides after Dr. Delgoofy cannonballs a half-cup of olive oil. The horror music was a nice touch, but the result is about as horrifying as drinking a gallon of water and then discovering that the volume of urine in your bladder has doubled an hour later. In fact, if you ever swallow a half-cup of oil and your triglycerides don’t rise dramatically, check yourself into a hospital pronto and ask them to find the blockage in your digestive system.

The reason you find a long list of “essential fatty acids” listed in biochemisty textbooks is that — surprise! — your body needs fats. Your hair, your nails, your brain, your nervous system, your cell walls, your hormones, etc. — they’re all fat-dependent. Now, I suppose in theory you could fill a hundred syringes with fat and inject the stuff where it’s needed, but that would probably hurt. Plus your body likes to break nutrients down into little-bitty pieces before using them.

Consequently, most of us prefer to get our essential fats by eating them. The digestive system then does the work of breaking them down into itty-bitty pieces and packaging them as triglycerides — three fatty acids bound up with a glycerol molecule. Then the triglycerides are delivered to your tissues through your bloodstream.

So when Dr. Delgoofy showed us that the triglycerides in his blood doubled after a big belt of oil, all he proved is that his liver and bloodstream are in working order. If Dr. Delgoofy is a real doctor, then he surely knows that eating always raises triglycerides. That’s why doctors measure your triglycerides after a 12-hour fast. To give you an idea of how dramatically eating a meal can affect the measurement, here’s a tidbit I found online:

My blood triglyceride level was alarmingly high 497 mg/dL. It turned out to be a false result. A nurse sent to my home by my life insurance company had taken my blood sample just a few hours after I ate lunch. When my doctor drew my blood after an overnight fast during my annual physical a few months later, my triglyceride level was 97.

Larry Lindner
Tufts University School of Nutrition Science & Policy

If your fasting triglycerides are high, then you do have a problem. But it’s not dietary fat that causes high fasting triglycerides. Rather than explain it myself, I’ll quote Dr. William Davis:

One of the most common triglyceride myths is that eating fats increases triglyceride. But that’s only a half-truth, since fats do indeed increase triglycerides – but only if triglycerides are measured after eating. Depending on the quantity of fat consumed and other factors, triglyceride levels can reach around 300 mg/dl after a fat-containing meal, only to descend rapidly.

In contrast, carbohydrates can increase triglyceride levels many times higher, increasing levels to 300, 400, 500 mg/dl or more, even occasionally in the thousands, after many weeks to months of carbohydrate-excess. But carbohydrate excess leads not just to after-eating high triglycerides, but high triglycerides all the time.

The real story is that fats in the diet decrease triglycerides – at all other times except after a meal. The higher the fat content of your diet, the lower your triglycerides will be in a fasting blood draw. This has been well-established in numerous diet trials comparing low-fat with low-carbohydrate diets.

After demonstrating a perfectly normal rise in triglycerides after swallowing olive oil, Dr. Delgoofy continues his anti-fat demonstration by chowing down on a big sandwich and some pizza. Lots more fat, of course, but now he’s also consuming a heapin’ helpin’ of refined flour. Surprise, surprise … when he checks his blood levels awhile later, his triglycerides are up again, and so is his blood glucose level.

Once again, if he’s a real doctor, he knows perfectly well the rise in glucose was caused by the bread and the pizza crust, not the cheese and the meats. If he wanted to prove fat spikes blood sugar, he could’ve simply shown us a glucose reading after the olive oil. But nope … he stuffs himself with white flour, measures his glucose, then hopes to fool us into blaming the fat.

After seeing Dr. Davis give a lecture on the low-carb cruise, I got into the habit of checking my glucose after meals. Meats, eggs and cheeses barely cause a blip. But one white potato pushed my blood sugar up to 162. A small serving of pasta kicked it up to 174. After reading the latest book by Drs. Eades & Eades, my mom was finally persuaded to go on a low-carb diet. A few weeks later, her fasting glucose was down by 20 points. Her blood pressure and triglycerides dropped as well.

If her current diet is going to cause type 2 diabetes, I’d sure like for Dr. Delgoofy to explain the biochemistry of how that’s going to happen. I’d also like for him to point out the people who ate low-carb, high-fat diets and became diabetic in the process. I can certainly point to type 2 diabetics who were able to stop taking insulin shots after going low-carb.

Dr. Delgoofy tells us we should limit our dietary fat to 15% of total calories. Let’s back up to the beginning of his presentation and see how that’s working for him. Take at look at the fasting blood-work he showed us before consuming the olive oil:

The triglycerides are impressively low, so I’m guessing he doesn’t eat much sugar or other refined carbohydrates. But his HDL is an anemic 37. Mine was 64 last time I had it measured. As I found while digging through the American Heart Association’s data some months back, it’s low HDL that’s associated with heart disease, not high LDL. Here’s what the AHA itself says about HDL:

With HDL (good) cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol (less than 40 mg/dL for men, less than 50 mg/dL for women) puts you at higher risk for heart disease. In the average man, HDL cholesterol levels range from 40 to 50 mg/dL. In the average woman, they range from 50 to 60 mg/dL. An HDL of 60 mg/dL and above is considered protective against heart disease.

So even according to a kindred-spirit, fat-phobic organization, Dr. Delgoofy’s HDL is too low. Mine’s great. That’s because I eat plenty of fat. While we’re at it, let’s compare more of our cardiovascular markers.

Dr. Delgoofy told us his LDL is too low to be measured. The word to describe that claim rhymes with “tullpit.” Unless you want to spend a lot of money for a complicated lab test, LDL isn’t measured; it’s calculated by something known as the Friedewald equation, which looks like this:

LDL = Total cholesterol – HDL – (Triglycerides/5)

The reason we didn’t get an LDL reading for Dr. Delgoofy is that his triglycerides were inconclusive and simply shown as < 45. Dr. Eades and others have pointed out that the Friedewald equation tends to overestimate LDL for people with triglycerides below 100, but with that caveat in mind, let’s estimate Dr. Delgoofy’s LDL. For the sake of argument, I’ll assume his triglycerides are 40. We know his total cholesterol is 182 because his cholesterol ratio (total cholesterol/HDL) was listed as 4.9.

182 – 37 – (40/5) = 137

His LDL is probably lower than that because of the limitations of the Friedewald equation. But if he walked into a doctor’s office and had his lab work done, he’d be told his LDL is too high and his HDL is way too low. Meanwhile, here’s how my LDL would be calculated:

203 – 64 – (70/5) = 125

Mine would also be over-estimated. But going by the standard tests, I win that contest. Now let’s look the other ratios commonly used to predict heart trouble.

LDL / HDL
Dr. Delgoofy: 137 / 37 = 3.7  (average risk)
Fat Head: 125 / 64 = 1.95  (low risk)

Total Cholesterol / HDL
Dr. Delgoofy: 182 / 37 = 4.92  (average risk; over 5.0 isn’t good)
Fat Head: 203 / 64 = 3.17  (very low risk; anything below 3.5 is excellent)

Triglycerides / HDL
Dr. Delgoofy: 40 / 37 = 1.08
Fat Head: 70 / 64 = 1.09

A virtual tie on the last one. But on every other ratio, the guy whose diet is more than 50% fat is kicking the pants off the guy who tells us to limit our fat to 15%.  And by the way, my fasting glucose level is better too. His was 96. To prepare for this post, I checked mine this morning. It was 85.

Given his low triglycerides, Dr. Delgoofy’s heart is probably healthy. I sincerely hope so. But after seeing this video, I have doubts about his brain.


If you enjoy my posts, please consider a small donation to the Fat Head Kids GoFundMe campaign.
Share

86 thoughts on “How To Become Stupid In 5 Minutes

  1. lovelylentilla

    Well, that video was an education! The most revealing part to me was the emotional (with suitable music!) way he spoke about fat, and described his blood prior to the olive oil as “clean”.
    I noticed the olive oil apparently tastes disgusting to him, rather sad… my local coldpress is utterly delicious on a veggie stick and dunked in nut dukkah…

    Latent puritanism just loves the dirty/clean dichotomy!

    I enjoyed a chuckle myself when he nearly gagged on the olive oil.

  2. lovelylentilla

    Well, that video was an education! The most revealing part to me was the emotional (with suitable music!) way he spoke about fat, and described his blood prior to the olive oil as “clean”.
    I noticed the olive oil apparently tastes disgusting to him, rather sad… my local coldpress is utterly delicious on a veggie stick and dunked in nut dukkah…

    Latent puritanism just loves the dirty/clean dichotomy!

    I enjoyed a chuckle myself when he nearly gagged on the olive oil.

  3. JT

    This video does raise an interesting question, just how quickly can you raise your HDL levels? His went from 37 to 44 in just a few hours. As I’ve usually gone 6 months at a time between cholesterol tests I just naturally assumed it was a much slower process to change those levels. I didn’t think HDL and LDL test numbers were affected by fasting or non-fasting, only glucose levels being affected by meals.

    Cholesterol tests are taken after a 12-hour fast. Eating must affect those numbers to some degree as well.

  4. Lee

    Apparently he’s not an MD. He got a BA in psychology from USC and later got a Phd in Health Science from the Seventh-day Adventist vegetarians at Loma Linda Universtiy. Looks like he now peddles anti-aging supplements. On his web site he is proclaimed as “one of the world’s foremost authorities on anti-aging.”

    I’m relieved to know he didn’t attend medical school.

  5. leather nut

    The really sad thing about this is that if someone doesn’t know the truth about these things they would belive what the Dr. Goofy says. I agree with what you wrote Tom about pasta, I stay fine with the weight until I bust out the pasta. It takes about three days to lose what I gain when I eat pasta. The music was a great touch, it almost made it believable.

    That’s what worries me; people might fall for this demonstration.

  6. Richard Tamesis, M.D.

    I’d like to know what med school he graduated from so I can tell people what schools allow quacks and charlatans to graduate.

    I’m guessing he attended Dean Ornish’s alma mater.

  7. lovelylentilla

    Well, that video was an education! The most revealing part to me was the emotional (with suitable music!) way he spoke about fat, and described his blood prior to the olive oil as “clean”.
    I noticed the olive oil apparently tastes disgusting to him, rather sad… my local coldpress is utterly delicious on a veggie stick and dunked in nut dukkah…

    Latent puritanism just loves the dirty/clean dichotomy!

    I enjoyed a chuckle myself when he nearly gagged on the olive oil.

  8. Felix

    LOL @ “How to get incontinent in 5 minutes”. Perfect analogy.

    I think the really worrysome thing is that someone who hasn’t done his homework can get a fake degree, call himself a doctor and make money by giving bullshit advice. I used to believe that this was only common in the psychology field (John Gray comes to mind here), but doing it in the health field sounds profitable, too.
    Makes sense the fake docs promote some “cleansing”, “detoxing”, “purifying” pseudoscientific nonsense to vegans. Their critical thinking is not active in things that help them justify their cause of saving the animals.

  9. JT

    This video does raise an interesting question, just how quickly can you raise your HDL levels? His went from 37 to 44 in just a few hours. As I’ve usually gone 6 months at a time between cholesterol tests I just naturally assumed it was a much slower process to change those levels. I didn’t think HDL and LDL test numbers were affected by fasting or non-fasting, only glucose levels being affected by meals.

    Cholesterol tests are taken after a 12-hour fast. Eating must affect those numbers to some degree as well.

  10. Lee

    Apparently he’s not an MD. He got a BA in psychology from USC and later got a Phd in Health Science from the Seventh-day Adventist vegetarians at Loma Linda Universtiy. Looks like he now peddles anti-aging supplements. On his web site he is proclaimed as “one of the world’s foremost authorities on anti-aging.”

    I’m relieved to know he didn’t attend medical school.

  11. Lori

    Notice how he didn’t show us his blood sugar an hour after drinking just olive oil–or did he try that experiment? Doesn’t he think that high blood sugar has something to do with…sugar? Did he sleep through endocrinology class?

    The time I checked my BG after eating cauliflower and cheese fried in bacon grease, it dropped 15 points to 69 after an hour. And I’m middle aged and have diabetes on both sides of my family. When I checked my dog’s BG an hour after her low-carb dinner, it had dropped 10 points to 39.

    That’s another thing: according to what I’ve read on the BloodSugar101 site, you won’t get diabetes without certain genetic defects.

    Even if I knew nothing about diabetes or lipids, I’d infer that you probably shouldn’t drink half a cup of olive oil then scarf down a big sandwich and pizza. I’d think, Moderation!

    I think I may have had that same meal once, but I was a heavy drinker at the time.

  12. leather nut

    The really sad thing about this is that if someone doesn’t know the truth about these things they would belive what the Dr. Goofy says. I agree with what you wrote Tom about pasta, I stay fine with the weight until I bust out the pasta. It takes about three days to lose what I gain when I eat pasta. The music was a great touch, it almost made it believable.

    That’s what worries me; people might fall for this demonstration.

  13. Richard Tamesis, M.D.

    I’d like to know what med school he graduated from so I can tell people what schools allow quacks and charlatans to graduate.

    I’m guessing he attended Dean Ornish’s alma mater.

  14. Namine

    I’m going to make a similar video where I drink a whole gallon of water. It will be called “How to become incontinent in 5 minutes” Then I will tell the viewer about the dangers of high dihyrdrogen monoxide consumption.

    Good idea. In a Penn & Teller episode, they got hundreds of environmentalists to sign a petition to ban dihydrogen monoxide, so you’re clearly on the right track.

  15. Ed Terry

    I also did the math and came to the same conclusions. I was also very impressed with his HDL. Eating “healthy”, my HDL was always under 35. It now rarely drops below 70.

    I have several non-fasting lipid panels and every time, my triglycerides double after eating my fatty diet. They shoot up from 45 to 90! I’ve also noticed that my non-fasting HDL is higher than my fasting HDL.

    I love it when I sit down with a nurse to go over my lipid panels. They assume my results are fasting, and after their done telling me how great my numbers are, I fess up and tell them I hadn’t been fasting. Their eyes always get very big in amazement. They get even bigger when I tell them how I eat.

    I honestly think Dr. Delgoofy is merely clueless. He probably gets all his information from Dr. Oz.

    I hope he’s merely clueless. Otherwise he has the ethics of a snake-oil salesman.

  16. Felix

    LOL @ “How to get incontinent in 5 minutes”. Perfect analogy.

    I think the really worrysome thing is that someone who hasn’t done his homework can get a fake degree, call himself a doctor and make money by giving bullshit advice. I used to believe that this was only common in the psychology field (John Gray comes to mind here), but doing it in the health field sounds profitable, too.
    Makes sense the fake docs promote some “cleansing”, “detoxing”, “purifying” pseudoscientific nonsense to vegans. Their critical thinking is not active in things that help them justify their cause of saving the animals.

  17. TWV

    After watching the video I started to wonder: Is Dr. Nick from the Simpsons based on him? The part that gets me is how he boasts that it will take a little bit more effort to mess up his blood and then goes to eat the sub and pizza. Hmm, let’s see the sandwich could be anywhere between 30 and 120g carbs. If he went with a typical “low-fat” sub, maybe closer to about 90g. The pizza: 25-30g a slice. So this yo-yo drops the carb bomb and blames it on the fat?

    Oh please. The other thing that bugs me about the video is the way he tries to almost show off to help his point. “See, I have this plasma display and machine that goes ‘ping”, I know what I am talking about” . The other thing that I have noticed in the video was the bags of chips…why are they moving around? Was this fuel that was used to “mess up” his blood because he is just so healthy?

    I don’t think we’re allowed to question results that appear on a big TV screen.

  18. Linda

    Maybe he just wanted an excuse to consume those things? Anyone who could handle that kind of volume already has health issues!

  19. nonegiven

    There is a paper with a better formula for estimating LDL when triglycerides are below 100.
    http://razi.ams.ac.ir/aim/08113/0014.pdf
    LDL = TC/1.19 + TG/1.9 – HDL/1.1 – 38

    That equation puts Dr. Delgoofy’s LDL at 102. It puts mine at 111. Drat, that means I’ll have a heart attack and he won’t!

  20. Ed Terry

    I also did the math and came to the same conclusions. I was also very impressed with his HDL. Eating “healthy”, my HDL was always under 35. It now rarely drops below 70.

    I have several non-fasting lipid panels and every time, my triglycerides double after eating my fatty diet. They shoot up from 45 to 90! I’ve also noticed that my non-fasting HDL is higher than my fasting HDL.

    I love it when I sit down with a nurse to go over my lipid panels. They assume my results are fasting, and after their done telling me how great my numbers are, I fess up and tell them I hadn’t been fasting. Their eyes always get very big in amazement. They get even bigger when I tell them how I eat.

    I honestly think Dr. Delgoofy is merely clueless. He probably gets all his information from Dr. Oz.

    I hope he’s merely clueless. Otherwise he has the ethics of a snake-oil salesman.

  21. Karen J

    I think it’s important for people to show this video for what it is (a deliberate misrepresentation of the facts and basic biochemistry). Thanks for doing so!
    You are correct in suspecting that some people might actually fall for it. At the time I viewed it, There were 4 positive comments and 15 negative. So 26.6% of the viewers were suckered by the video. I suppose that 74% of people giving it a thumbs down, though, represents a step in the right direction. 🙂

    I consider that a good sign.

  22. Hilary Kyro

    Dr. Nick has set a world record for lifting piddly dumbells repeatedly until he has lifted 50, 000 pounds! Don’t laugh! This veggie could lift an entire cow if his mom cut it into tiny pieces.

  23. TWV

    After watching the video I started to wonder: Is Dr. Nick from the Simpsons based on him? The part that gets me is how he boasts that it will take a little bit more effort to mess up his blood and then goes to eat the sub and pizza. Hmm, let’s see the sandwich could be anywhere between 30 and 120g carbs. If he went with a typical “low-fat” sub, maybe closer to about 90g. The pizza: 25-30g a slice. So this yo-yo drops the carb bomb and blames it on the fat?

    Oh please. The other thing that bugs me about the video is the way he tries to almost show off to help his point. “See, I have this plasma display and machine that goes ‘ping”, I know what I am talking about” . The other thing that I have noticed in the video was the bags of chips…why are they moving around? Was this fuel that was used to “mess up” his blood because he is just so healthy?

    I don’t think we’re allowed to question results that appear on a big TV screen.

  24. Tom not the fathead guy

    What an amazing feat. Six hours of sustained stupidity and delusion. Just when I thought things couldn’t get any more idiotic after the meatloser guy and his buddy in the vegan call-out post.
    I hate big government but this crap seriously needs to be regulated. It’s such a danger to the health and well being of so many people that don’t want to study or know the basics of nutrition.

    Believe me, you don’t want the government setting standards for health advice. Look at their 2010 Dietary Guidelines … they agree with this idiot. The cure for misinformation is information.

  25. megan

    i want to thank you for all the work you do. my husband and i started reading your blog after we watched your movie last winter.

    you’ve turned us from cordain’s paleo to fat-heads. we had our blood work done just this past week and my triglycerides were 36, HDL 71 and total 171. his #’s were similar.

    we’re both in our mid twenties and can’t thank you enough for opening our eyes.

    Outstanding results. Getting your diet on track in your twenties, you’re going to be healthy for a long, long time.

  26. Gisela

    I wish I could go through this frame by frame to be sure, but from what I can see, he only drank maybe 1/4 cup of oil. The cups are 3 oz Dixie, and he only filled one up to about the 2/3 full level. I couldn’t detect if he then drank another similarly filled cup at any point. So there’s some doubt about his truthfulness just on that.

    Secondly, what’s all the refined carbage all over his desk and tabletop for? How many grams of carbs did he really load up on?

    Cute touch, seeming to be writhing on the floor in fast motion to imply his heroic struggle to demonstrate to his audience the dread evils of fats. The oil may be olive, but he’s really a snake.

  27. Michael Gold

    Tom: your post reminded me of Dr. Eades’ shredding of a bad report by ABC news: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/saturated-fat/abcs-big-meal-propaganda/

    He wrote, for example: “It’s pretty impressive when the lab tech holds up the tube of blood taken after the meal and compares it to the one taken before the meal. There is a lot of fat swimming in the serum, that’s for sure. What the producers of this piece (and, sadly, the doctors commenting although they should know better) want you to take away from all this by the way they set it up is that all that saturated fat went directly into the blood. And how can you argue with them? It’s there for all to see.

    Problem is, that’s what blood samples look like after almost any meal, especially one that contains carbohydrates. The fat you see isn’t the fat the two reporters ate; it is the fat the liver has made from the carbohydrate. It’s the same picture a tube of blood would show after either of the two doctors had eaten a high-carb, low-fat lunch.

    The blood samples were taken two hours after the meal. Dietary carbohydrate is absorbed directly into the blood and makes a pass through the liver where it stimulates the production of triglycerides, the fat you see in the blood. Fat, especially long-chain saturated fat digests very slowly, and doesn’t reach the blood until much later than the two hour mark. While carbs go directly into the blood, fats take a different route. The process that breaks down dietary fat into its component fatty acids is a lengthy process as compared to the breakdown of carbs. Once the fat has broken down, it has to combine with bile salts to make it into a form that is water soluble and can be taken up by the intestinal cells. Once taken up, unlike carbs, which are sent directly to the bloodstream, fats go into the lymphatic system, a much smaller and more static transport system than the vasculature. Once in the lymphatics, fats make their way to the thoracic duct, which empties into a large vein in the upper chest. The lymphatics are small vessels and take a long time to move their contents along since there is no heartbeat pushing them as there is with blood. As I say, the fat in the blood you see on the video didn’t come from the saturated fat in the diet, although that was definitely the implication.”

    Well…I’m off to have half a can of coconut milk. I’m craving it, even after having some “paleo burgers” made from a pound of grass-fed beef, and eaten on whole-leaf lettuce. With the pan grease. So good, I gotta lick the plate! Lots of good fat and nutrients there after the burgers!!

    I remember yelling at my TV when that ABC report ran.

  28. nonegiven

    There is a paper with a better formula for estimating LDL when triglycerides are below 100.
    http://razi.ams.ac.ir/aim/08113/0014.pdf
    LDL = TC/1.19 + TG/1.9 – HDL/1.1 – 38

    That equation puts Dr. Delgoofy’s LDL at 102. It puts mine at 111. Drat, that means I’ll have a heart attack and he won’t!

  29. Karen J

    I think it’s important for people to show this video for what it is (a deliberate misrepresentation of the facts and basic biochemistry). Thanks for doing so!
    You are correct in suspecting that some people might actually fall for it. At the time I viewed it, There were 4 positive comments and 15 negative. So 26.6% of the viewers were suckered by the video. I suppose that 74% of people giving it a thumbs down, though, represents a step in the right direction. 🙂

    I consider that a good sign.

  30. Hilary Kyro

    Dr. Nick has set a world record for lifting piddly dumbells repeatedly until he has lifted 50, 000 pounds! Don’t laugh! This veggie could lift an entire cow if his mom cut it into tiny pieces.

  31. Carol Bardelli

    From the Napa Valley California to Naples, Italy people have olive oil tasting events. Shops that sell gourmet oils provide shoppers with sample shots. Good olive oil is a culinary thrill. I don’t think Dr. Goofy has a palate anymore because he’s been eating too much low fat, tasteless crap.

  32. dlm

    How to Become a Diabetic in 40 years (real life experience): Be a sugar/starch addict (from a family of same + alcohol) with 3 maternal siblings diagnosed type II.
    How to Become a Non-Diabetic in a few hours: STOP eating sugar/starch (and avoid diabetic drugs too) — see Dr. Richard K. Bernstein’s Diabetic Solution.

  33. Tom not the fathead guy

    What an amazing feat. Six hours of sustained stupidity and delusion. Just when I thought things couldn’t get any more idiotic after the meatloser guy and his buddy in the vegan call-out post.
    I hate big government but this crap seriously needs to be regulated. It’s such a danger to the health and well being of so many people that don’t want to study or know the basics of nutrition.

    Believe me, you don’t want the government setting standards for health advice. Look at their 2010 Dietary Guidelines … they agree with this idiot. The cure for misinformation is information.

  34. megan

    i want to thank you for all the work you do. my husband and i started reading your blog after we watched your movie last winter.

    you’ve turned us from cordain’s paleo to fat-heads. we had our blood work done just this past week and my triglycerides were 36, HDL 71 and total 171. his #’s were similar.

    we’re both in our mid twenties and can’t thank you enough for opening our eyes.

    Outstanding results. Getting your diet on track in your twenties, you’re going to be healthy for a long, long time.

  35. Your older brother

    “fats go into the lymphatic system, a much smaller and more static transport system than the vasculature. Once in the lymphatics, fats make their way to the thoracic duct, which empties into a large vein in the upper chest. ”

    Thought that was interesting. Seems the lymphatic system gets brought up a lot when talking about cancer, especially re: mestastisizing. Do Eades, et. al., have any thoughts relative to how restricting fat affects this system? Just a random thought.

    Cheers.

    Not that I’m aware of, but there’s some interesting research suggesting that restricting sugar and starch may starve tumors.

    1. cavenewt

      “Seems the lymphatic system gets brought up a lot when talking about cancer, especially re: mestastisizing. Do Eades, et. al., have any thoughts relative to how restricting fat affects this system?”

      I had exactly the same thought.

  36. Gisela

    I wish I could go through this frame by frame to be sure, but from what I can see, he only drank maybe 1/4 cup of oil. The cups are 3 oz Dixie, and he only filled one up to about the 2/3 full level. I couldn’t detect if he then drank another similarly filled cup at any point. So there’s some doubt about his truthfulness just on that.

    Secondly, what’s all the refined carbage all over his desk and tabletop for? How many grams of carbs did he really load up on?

    Cute touch, seeming to be writhing on the floor in fast motion to imply his heroic struggle to demonstrate to his audience the dread evils of fats. The oil may be olive, but he’s really a snake.

  37. Michael Gold

    Tom: your post reminded me of Dr. Eades’ shredding of a bad report by ABC news: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/saturated-fat/abcs-big-meal-propaganda/

    He wrote, for example: “It’s pretty impressive when the lab tech holds up the tube of blood taken after the meal and compares it to the one taken before the meal. There is a lot of fat swimming in the serum, that’s for sure. What the producers of this piece (and, sadly, the doctors commenting although they should know better) want you to take away from all this by the way they set it up is that all that saturated fat went directly into the blood. And how can you argue with them? It’s there for all to see.

    Problem is, that’s what blood samples look like after almost any meal, especially one that contains carbohydrates. The fat you see isn’t the fat the two reporters ate; it is the fat the liver has made from the carbohydrate. It’s the same picture a tube of blood would show after either of the two doctors had eaten a high-carb, low-fat lunch.

    The blood samples were taken two hours after the meal. Dietary carbohydrate is absorbed directly into the blood and makes a pass through the liver where it stimulates the production of triglycerides, the fat you see in the blood. Fat, especially long-chain saturated fat digests very slowly, and doesn’t reach the blood until much later than the two hour mark. While carbs go directly into the blood, fats take a different route. The process that breaks down dietary fat into its component fatty acids is a lengthy process as compared to the breakdown of carbs. Once the fat has broken down, it has to combine with bile salts to make it into a form that is water soluble and can be taken up by the intestinal cells. Once taken up, unlike carbs, which are sent directly to the bloodstream, fats go into the lymphatic system, a much smaller and more static transport system than the vasculature. Once in the lymphatics, fats make their way to the thoracic duct, which empties into a large vein in the upper chest. The lymphatics are small vessels and take a long time to move their contents along since there is no heartbeat pushing them as there is with blood. As I say, the fat in the blood you see on the video didn’t come from the saturated fat in the diet, although that was definitely the implication.”

    Well…I’m off to have half a can of coconut milk. I’m craving it, even after having some “paleo burgers” made from a pound of grass-fed beef, and eaten on whole-leaf lettuce. With the pan grease. So good, I gotta lick the plate! Lots of good fat and nutrients there after the burgers!!

    I remember yelling at my TV when that ABC report ran.

  38. Carol Bardelli

    From the Napa Valley California to Naples, Italy people have olive oil tasting events. Shops that sell gourmet oils provide shoppers with sample shots. Good olive oil is a culinary thrill. I don’t think Dr. Goofy has a palate anymore because he’s been eating too much low fat, tasteless crap.

  39. dlm

    How to Become a Diabetic in 40 years (real life experience): Be a sugar/starch addict (from a family of same + alcohol) with 3 maternal siblings diagnosed type II.
    How to Become a Non-Diabetic in a few hours: STOP eating sugar/starch (and avoid diabetic drugs too) — see Dr. Richard K. Bernstein’s Diabetic Solution.

  40. Your older brother

    “fats go into the lymphatic system, a much smaller and more static transport system than the vasculature. Once in the lymphatics, fats make their way to the thoracic duct, which empties into a large vein in the upper chest. ”

    Thought that was interesting. Seems the lymphatic system gets brought up a lot when talking about cancer, especially re: mestastisizing. Do Eades, et. al., have any thoughts relative to how restricting fat affects this system? Just a random thought.

    Cheers.

    Not that I’m aware of, but there’s some interesting research suggesting that restricting sugar and starch may starve tumors.

    1. cavenewt

      “Seems the lymphatic system gets brought up a lot when talking about cancer, especially re: mestastisizing. Do Eades, et. al., have any thoughts relative to how restricting fat affects this system?”

      I had exactly the same thought.

  41. Dan Moline

    At the moment I’m confused.
    I started eating low carb on May 1 of this year.
    Before I started my lipid panel was:
    TC: 173
    HDL: 47
    LDL: 90
    TRG: 217

    Two months of eating low carb (~100gms/day), my lipid panel was:
    TC:163
    HDL: 60
    LDL: 82
    TRG: 127
    GREAT, it’s working!

    A couple weeks ago I decided to go ketogenic to lose the last nagging 10 pounds. I happened to have another blood test 2 weeks after starting. The results:

    TC: 101
    HDL: 54
    LDL: not measureable
    TRG: 361!!

    What is going on?? My daily carb intake was < 20gm/day. The ketostix were dark purple every day.

    I’m really bummed. After doing some web research, I’ve found some indication that a ketogenic diet can possibly cause pancreatitis … which can also be caused by high triglyceride levels. A connection? In any event, I’m back to ~100gms/day again of carbs.

    I’ve never heard of a ketogenic diet causing pancreatitis, but the rise in triglycerides is certainly worrisome. Was that one test, or confirmed by another?

  42. Richard Tamesis, M.D.

    Whenever you get a lab test result that is unexpected, the first thing you must check for is a laboratory error. It does happen, mixups can happen and can easily lead to therapeutic disasters.

  43. Dan Moline

    At the moment I’m confused.
    I started eating low carb on May 1 of this year.
    Before I started my lipid panel was:
    TC: 173
    HDL: 47
    LDL: 90
    TRG: 217

    Two months of eating low carb (~100gms/day), my lipid panel was:
    TC:163
    HDL: 60
    LDL: 82
    TRG: 127
    GREAT, it’s working!

    A couple weeks ago I decided to go ketogenic to lose the last nagging 10 pounds. I happened to have another blood test 2 weeks after starting. The results:

    TC: 101
    HDL: 54
    LDL: not measureable
    TRG: 361!!

    What is going on?? My daily carb intake was < 20gm/day. The ketostix were dark purple every day.

    I’m really bummed. After doing some web research, I’ve found some indication that a ketogenic diet can possibly cause pancreatitis … which can also be caused by high triglyceride levels. A connection? In any event, I’m back to ~100gms/day again of carbs.

    I’ve never heard of a ketogenic diet causing pancreatitis, but the rise in triglycerides is certainly worrisome. Was that one test, or confirmed by another?

  44. Richard Tamesis, M.D.

    Whenever you get a lab test result that is unexpected, the first thing you must check for is a laboratory error. It does happen, mixups can happen and can easily lead to therapeutic disasters.

  45. Dan Moline

    That was just one test (by a different lab than the others). 70% of my calories were fat. Half of that was saturated. So when I saw this video, I thought “is it the fat after all?”. I’m going to get with my doctor in a week or two and get another blood test from the same lab as the others.

    I’d certainly want another lab test. I’m not saying it’s impossible, but fasting triglycerides over 300 for someone on a low-carb diet seems unlikely. I also wouldn’t want to see total cholesterol near 100.

Comments are closed.