Who Gives Carbohydrates To Diabetics?

Dana Carpender posted this message from the Nutrition and Metabolism Society on her Hold The Toast site recently.  I’m delighted to see real scientists calling out the ADA for their nonsense.

As my mom found out, if your blood sugar is at or approaching diabetic levels, your doctor will probably send you to a nutritionist or dietician, who will probably tell you to eat lots of complex carbs and limit your fats.  It makes zero biological sense.

I’ll be in Chicago this week.  We’re celebrating our 10th anniversary by returning to the scene of the crime.  (Don’t tell the paleo fanatics, but this almost certainly means I’ll be indulging in a stuffed pizza from Giordano’s — still the best pizza I’ve ever had.)

I’ll check comments when I can and perhaps write a post if anything strikes my fancy, but mostly I plan to just enjoy the time off … and take my wife to the fancy seafood restaurant where, halfway through dinner on our second date, I knew I wanted to marry her someday.


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116 thoughts on “Who Gives Carbohydrates To Diabetics?

  1. William Davis, MD

    Hi, Tom–

    This is priceless!

    Fight fire with fire! I, too, have been in awe at the incredible buffoonery of conventional ADA dietary advice.

    Typical scenario: A person I’ve helped become NON-diabetic with carbohydrate restriction gets hospitalized for some reason, e.g., rhythm disorder or pneumonia. They are fed an “ADA 1800 calorie diet” during their stay. Blood sugars? Flagrant diabetic range.

    The American Diabetes Diet without a doubt CAUSES diabetes.

    We need to clone you, Dr. Mary Vernon, Drs. Eades & Eades, etc., so you can take over the medical world.

  2. monasmee

    Tom & Chareva,

    Happy 10th Anniversary during your Chicago visit!

    I was in Wrigleyville the night the Blackhawks earned their way into the playoffs, and then went to White Castle to help celebrate.

    From one friend to another, stick with the Giordano’s pizza.

    Oh yeah, it’s Giordano’s all the way.

  3. Lori

    I just read “Cro Magnon: How the Ice Age Gave Birth to the First Modern Humans” by Brian Fagan. Those of us of European ancestry are descended from people who lived on the tundra during an ice age lasting over 100,000 years. During the late Ice Age, writes Fagan on p. 157, “Wild plants and fruit were unimportant in landscapes where growing seasons were extremely short. Judging from a study of modern Alaskan caribou hunters, most people probably consumed no more than a cupful or so of plant food every year.” (As most of us know, carbohydrate comes from plants.)

    This is what gets me. Even if you don’t know anything about how different nutrients affect you, you can read a book on prehistoric diets (the basics of which don’t seem to be disputed by serious people) and see how people lived in difficult climates. We got along without grains or year-round fruit or yogurt for hundreds of thousands of years…suddenly, we need this stuff?

    I’m afraid a lot of dieticians only think back a few thousand years and assume farming is our natural way of life.

  4. Dan

    Someone once pointed out that ADA should stand for Assured Diabetes Association.

    I used to follow the advice of ADA, dieticians, food pyramid, etc. All I got was years of morbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. I now find it best to ignore their advice and do the opposite of what they recommend.

    Definitely best to ignore them.

  5. Chris

    Interesting article in Tribune this morning about making “healthy choices” at Taste of Chicago. I’ve been making the healthy choice for 30 years and staying away. Nothing worse than eating and walking amongst throngs of tragically dressed Chicagoans and tourists. Many of the restaurants here are air conditioned in the summer. Who knew?

    I’m guessing the “healthy choices” are the lowfat dishes?

  6. Josef Brandenburg

    Good visual.

    You can’t be perfect all the time… pizza once every week or two, especially if its after your resistance work.

    Whenever I eat stuff with PUFA + gluten + fructose I get this weird bumpy red rash on my feet.

    I just feel really, really full after stuffed pizza.

  7. Clair Schwan

    This ADA organization is amazingly like a government organization, believing it can be the cure for the very illness it’s helping create and promote.

    Too true. Perhaps they should tax us and get it overwith.

  8. Debbie

    Ohh, Giordano’s, . Good thing I have not been to Chicago for over 20 years, athough a few years ago, before I get really serious about low carb, a friend in Chicago mailed me a half-frozen Giordano’s pizza that I just had to pop in my oven. It was as good as I remembered. There are lots of pizza places in the NY/NJ area where I live, one on almost every street corner it seems, but I can bypass those without blinking an eye. It’s only Chicago deep dish that ever won my heart. Oh well, still plugging away on my low carb and weight loss journey. Down another 12 pounds since the low carb cruise in March to reach a new low. I’ll just daydream about Giordano’s. 🙂

    A few years ago, when I was still in L.A., my in-laws flew out for a birthday visit and brought a couple of those frozen Giordano’s pizzas with them. Now that’s love.

  9. Mark. Gooley

    Type 1 diabetic for nearly forty years, finally getting some good control by ignoring the ADA and dropping the carbohydrates. I’ve had to use less insulin, and I’m at last losing weight. I was in hospital last fall for an infection: more carbohydrates in one meal than I usually eat in a day, and my skyrocketing blood glucose was of course blamed on the infection, not the starches.

    I constantly get e-mail and snail-mail solicitations to re-join the ADA and get Diabetes Forecast magazine again. Someday I’ll probably cut loose and write a scathing letter to the editor, vowing that the ADA will never see a penny of my money again. I’m glad that someone is criticizing those incompetents in public.

    You don’t need Diabetes Forecast, though, if you merely want to poke fun at ADA-style recipes. Get a copy of any recent issue of Food and Wine magazine. Most recipes are slavishly low-fat yet many are rich in carbohydrates, and some of the celebrity chefs are madly in love with agave nectar — essentially fructose syrup.

    How anyone can feed a patient a load of carbohydrates and then blame the high blood sugar on anything else is beyond me.

  10. David

    Hope Warshaw,a nutritionist who frequently speaks for the ADA, once appeared on television and said that diabetics deserved to be able to eat the same foods as anyone else. Here is some advice from her website. It is immoral to do this to people>

    “For many years people with diabetes were told to stay away from sugar, sweets and starches because they would raise blood glucose too quickly and too high. Research on this topic has accumulated over the years to prove this advice wrong. In 1994 the nutrition recommendations changed dramatically. Today sugary foods, sweets and starches are no longer verbotin for people with any type of diabetes.

    What is true is that people with diabetes need to learn, like all people who try to eat healthy, to enjoy moderate amounts of sweets and sugary foods in moderation and on occasion. All sources of carbohydrate – sugary foods, sweets and starches and even fruits and vegetables – will raise blood glucose. Concentrated sources of carbohydrate, such as sugary foods and sweets can make blood glucose rise more.

    The amount of sweets you can eat has everything to do with your current health and diabetes status and goals. For example a person with type 2 diabetes who is trying to lose weight and control their high triglycerides needs to keep sugary foods and sweets to a minimum due to their calorie content and impact on triglycerides. Whereas the teenager with type 1 diabetes can likely enjoy more sweets if they know how to adjust their rapid acting insulin. Learn more about how to fit sweets and sugary foods into your diabetes eating plan in my book Complete Guide to Carb Counting.

    And when it comes to starches. The message today is not about avoidance. It is all about making healthy choices, such as choosing whole grain breads, cereals and starches. ”

    I agree. The advice is immoral.

  11. Dan

    Someone once pointed out that ADA should stand for Assured Diabetes Association.

    I used to follow the advice of ADA, dieticians, food pyramid, etc. All I got was years of morbid obesity and type 2 diabetes. I now find it best to ignore their advice and do the opposite of what they recommend.

    Definitely best to ignore them.

  12. Chris

    Interesting article in Tribune this morning about making “healthy choices” at Taste of Chicago. I’ve been making the healthy choice for 30 years and staying away. Nothing worse than eating and walking amongst throngs of tragically dressed Chicagoans and tourists. Many of the restaurants here are air conditioned in the summer. Who knew?

    I’m guessing the “healthy choices” are the lowfat dishes?

  13. Jonathan

    That would make an awesome poster! Need to put it up at the hospital I work at (some do-gooder would tear it down though).

    We took a trip to Chicago once. Giordano’s is amazing!
    The bread to cheese ratio is much better than regular pizza. I could pull the bottom layer of crust off and still have a big meal. Enjoy!

    That middle layer, with all the meat and cheese, is at least an inch thick.

  14. Paul B.

    Thanks for sharing this. I went through all of this with my late stepfather. Among his other disabilities he was diabetic. His doctor, who he and my Mom adored, recommended the standard ADA high carb diet. I went round and round with them about this and never could get them to consider the possibility that the doctor was mistaken. He never did get his blood sugars stable.

    When he was hospitalized my stepdad was given an “1800 calorie diabetic diet.” It was as horrific as you would imagine. Breakfast was canned fruit, oatmeal, and eggs (no doubt from a powdered mix). Sandwich and salad with sugary lowfat dressing for lunch, etc. Just regular hospital swill.

  15. Paul B.

    BTW I agree with the poster above regarding economic incentives for keeping people sick. It’s one of the main reasons for the ADA pushing carbs. Others are:

    1. They don’t want to admit they were wrong.

    2. They buy into the myth about saturated fat causing heart disease.

    3. They think most people just won’t follow a low carb diet. (That is true, but some will, and shouldn’t patients be given all relevant information about their choices so they can decide for themselves what sacrifices they are willing to make?)

    Indeed, let’s give the correct information at least. People can ignore it if they choose. Personally, I’d much rather give up sugar and starch than fat.

  16. Josef Brandenburg

    Good visual.

    You can’t be perfect all the time… pizza once every week or two, especially if its after your resistance work.

    Whenever I eat stuff with PUFA + gluten + fructose I get this weird bumpy red rash on my feet.

    I just feel really, really full after stuffed pizza.

  17. Annikki

    I thought of y’all here when I was in the hospital Friday evening and Saturday morning, post-breast reduction. My husband and I boggled at the food they brought me. The salad wouldn’t have been so bad, if there had been something other than fat-free ranch to put on it. I was kind of blown away, after trying it, that I used to willingly eat that shit. With this was chicken pot pie with potatoes and crust, and bread pudding. I’m not sure what the *margarine* was supposed to go on. Breakfast consisted of a tiny scoop of scrambled eggs (my husband, who does most of the egg-cooking in our house, said it was less than one small egg’s worth, and appeared to be from some sort of reconstituted mix), two strips of turkey bacon, low fat yogurt, apple juice, and COFFEE CAKE!

    What is this crap that they’re trying to serve here???? The protein tended to be in minuscule portions, and there was sugar and starch all over the place. But oooohhhhh, must have low fat! Must use margarine!

    Thankfully, husband went to the food court for dinner and brought back pecan-crusted chicken, pecan-crusted cauliflower, and sweet potato chips, which he shared with me. Not the absolute best, because they probably used some bread crumbs in that, but still significantly better. And soon as we got home Saturday morning, he fixed me a steak salad with blue cheese dressing.

    I love my husband. 🙂

    Makes you wonder if they’re serving meals designed to create long-term customers.

  18. Clair Schwan

    This ADA organization is amazingly like a government organization, believing it can be the cure for the very illness it’s helping create and promote.

    Too true. Perhaps they should tax us and get it overwith.

  19. Debbie

    Ohh, Giordano’s, . Good thing I have not been to Chicago for over 20 years, athough a few years ago, before I get really serious about low carb, a friend in Chicago mailed me a half-frozen Giordano’s pizza that I just had to pop in my oven. It was as good as I remembered. There are lots of pizza places in the NY/NJ area where I live, one on almost every street corner it seems, but I can bypass those without blinking an eye. It’s only Chicago deep dish that ever won my heart. Oh well, still plugging away on my low carb and weight loss journey. Down another 12 pounds since the low carb cruise in March to reach a new low. I’ll just daydream about Giordano’s. 🙂

    A few years ago, when I was still in L.A., my in-laws flew out for a birthday visit and brought a couple of those frozen Giordano’s pizzas with them. Now that’s love.

  20. Mark. Gooley

    Type 1 diabetic for nearly forty years, finally getting some good control by ignoring the ADA and dropping the carbohydrates. I’ve had to use less insulin, and I’m at last losing weight. I was in hospital last fall for an infection: more carbohydrates in one meal than I usually eat in a day, and my skyrocketing blood glucose was of course blamed on the infection, not the starches.

    I constantly get e-mail and snail-mail solicitations to re-join the ADA and get Diabetes Forecast magazine again. Someday I’ll probably cut loose and write a scathing letter to the editor, vowing that the ADA will never see a penny of my money again. I’m glad that someone is criticizing those incompetents in public.

    You don’t need Diabetes Forecast, though, if you merely want to poke fun at ADA-style recipes. Get a copy of any recent issue of Food and Wine magazine. Most recipes are slavishly low-fat yet many are rich in carbohydrates, and some of the celebrity chefs are madly in love with agave nectar — essentially fructose syrup.

    How anyone can feed a patient a load of carbohydrates and then blame the high blood sugar on anything else is beyond me.

  21. David

    Hope Warshaw,a nutritionist who frequently speaks for the ADA, once appeared on television and said that diabetics deserved to be able to eat the same foods as anyone else. Here is some advice from her website. It is immoral to do this to people>

    “For many years people with diabetes were told to stay away from sugar, sweets and starches because they would raise blood glucose too quickly and too high. Research on this topic has accumulated over the years to prove this advice wrong. In 1994 the nutrition recommendations changed dramatically. Today sugary foods, sweets and starches are no longer verbotin for people with any type of diabetes.

    What is true is that people with diabetes need to learn, like all people who try to eat healthy, to enjoy moderate amounts of sweets and sugary foods in moderation and on occasion. All sources of carbohydrate – sugary foods, sweets and starches and even fruits and vegetables – will raise blood glucose. Concentrated sources of carbohydrate, such as sugary foods and sweets can make blood glucose rise more.

    The amount of sweets you can eat has everything to do with your current health and diabetes status and goals. For example a person with type 2 diabetes who is trying to lose weight and control their high triglycerides needs to keep sugary foods and sweets to a minimum due to their calorie content and impact on triglycerides. Whereas the teenager with type 1 diabetes can likely enjoy more sweets if they know how to adjust their rapid acting insulin. Learn more about how to fit sweets and sugary foods into your diabetes eating plan in my book Complete Guide to Carb Counting.

    And when it comes to starches. The message today is not about avoidance. It is all about making healthy choices, such as choosing whole grain breads, cereals and starches. ”

    I agree. The advice is immoral.

  22. Dave, RN

    I really seriously do want that image you posted as a pdf download or a poster. Where can we get that? I can’t find it on their website. I WILL post it at my home care office.

    I went to Hopes site. Her latest post is about the new food guidelines, and she implored is to let her know what we thought.

    So I did. She’s probably sorry she asked.

    I’ll try to find out if there’s a way to get it as a poster.

  23. Jonathan

    That would make an awesome poster! Need to put it up at the hospital I work at (some do-gooder would tear it down though).

    We took a trip to Chicago once. Giordano’s is amazing!
    The bread to cheese ratio is much better than regular pizza. I could pull the bottom layer of crust off and still have a big meal. Enjoy!

    That middle layer, with all the meat and cheese, is at least an inch thick.

  24. Paul B.

    Thanks for sharing this. I went through all of this with my late stepfather. Among his other disabilities he was diabetic. His doctor, who he and my Mom adored, recommended the standard ADA high carb diet. I went round and round with them about this and never could get them to consider the possibility that the doctor was mistaken. He never did get his blood sugars stable.

    When he was hospitalized my stepdad was given an “1800 calorie diabetic diet.” It was as horrific as you would imagine. Breakfast was canned fruit, oatmeal, and eggs (no doubt from a powdered mix). Sandwich and salad with sugary lowfat dressing for lunch, etc. Just regular hospital swill.

  25. Paul B.

    BTW I agree with the poster above regarding economic incentives for keeping people sick. It’s one of the main reasons for the ADA pushing carbs. Others are:

    1. They don’t want to admit they were wrong.

    2. They buy into the myth about saturated fat causing heart disease.

    3. They think most people just won’t follow a low carb diet. (That is true, but some will, and shouldn’t patients be given all relevant information about their choices so they can decide for themselves what sacrifices they are willing to make?)

    Indeed, let’s give the correct information at least. People can ignore it if they choose. Personally, I’d much rather give up sugar and starch than fat.

  26. Annikki

    I thought of y’all here when I was in the hospital Friday evening and Saturday morning, post-breast reduction. My husband and I boggled at the food they brought me. The salad wouldn’t have been so bad, if there had been something other than fat-free ranch to put on it. I was kind of blown away, after trying it, that I used to willingly eat that shit. With this was chicken pot pie with potatoes and crust, and bread pudding. I’m not sure what the *margarine* was supposed to go on. Breakfast consisted of a tiny scoop of scrambled eggs (my husband, who does most of the egg-cooking in our house, said it was less than one small egg’s worth, and appeared to be from some sort of reconstituted mix), two strips of turkey bacon, low fat yogurt, apple juice, and COFFEE CAKE!

    What is this crap that they’re trying to serve here???? The protein tended to be in minuscule portions, and there was sugar and starch all over the place. But oooohhhhh, must have low fat! Must use margarine!

    Thankfully, husband went to the food court for dinner and brought back pecan-crusted chicken, pecan-crusted cauliflower, and sweet potato chips, which he shared with me. Not the absolute best, because they probably used some bread crumbs in that, but still significantly better. And soon as we got home Saturday morning, he fixed me a steak salad with blue cheese dressing.

    I love my husband. 🙂

    Makes you wonder if they’re serving meals designed to create long-term customers.

  27. Dave, RN

    I really seriously do want that image you posted as a pdf download or a poster. Where can we get that? I can’t find it on their website. I WILL post it at my home care office.

    I went to Hopes site. Her latest post is about the new food guidelines, and she implored is to let her know what we thought.

    So I did. She’s probably sorry she asked.

    I’ll try to find out if there’s a way to get it as a poster.

  28. Laurie Cagnassola

    Thank you Tom for posting this and thanks again Dana for all of your support! All of the comments are encouraging and together we can end this absurdity. Keep spreading the word on your blogs and all over the internet – thanks to all for your help in promoting truth in nutritional science. Please keep sending people to our site (www.NMSociety.org) for the science that is being ignored by the organizations people with diabetes turn to for help!
    Best,
    Laurie Cagnassola
    Director
    Nutrition & Metabolism Society

    Thank you, Laurie, for the work you do. Some people have asked if that graphic is available as a poster. If it is, let us know.

  29. Peter Lucarelli

    Both my sons have type 2 Diabetes both got bad advice about eating carbo’s. After learning from Dr. Berstein’s
    book I put both of them on low carb diet with workout routine and one of my son’s lost some weight and was
    able to eliminate taking insulin shots and his blood glucose readings are excellent. My other son has now lost
    over 40 pounds and his blood glucose readings are between 85 and 95 with almost no diabetes medication.
    The ADA recommends 35% to 45% of your diet should be carbos that is crazy for people who do not have
    diabetes but is really insane for a person who has diabetes to be eating any carbos.

    Glad you figured it out. Think of all the confused parents who don’t.

  30. Laurie Cagnassola

    Thank you Tom for posting this and thanks again Dana for all of your support! All of the comments are encouraging and together we can end this absurdity. Keep spreading the word on your blogs and all over the internet – thanks to all for your help in promoting truth in nutritional science. Please keep sending people to our site (www.NMSociety.org) for the science that is being ignored by the organizations people with diabetes turn to for help!
    Best,
    Laurie Cagnassola
    Director
    Nutrition & Metabolism Society

    Thank you, Laurie, for the work you do. Some people have asked if that graphic is available as a poster. If it is, let us know.

  31. Peter Lucarelli

    Both my sons have type 2 Diabetes both got bad advice about eating carbo’s. After learning from Dr. Berstein’s
    book I put both of them on low carb diet with workout routine and one of my son’s lost some weight and was
    able to eliminate taking insulin shots and his blood glucose readings are excellent. My other son has now lost
    over 40 pounds and his blood glucose readings are between 85 and 95 with almost no diabetes medication.
    The ADA recommends 35% to 45% of your diet should be carbos that is crazy for people who do not have
    diabetes but is really insane for a person who has diabetes to be eating any carbos.

    Glad you figured it out. Think of all the confused parents who don’t.

  32. Cathryn

    Happy Anniversary! Enjoy your stay in Chicago!

    I am amazed, simply amazed. My friend who has Type 2 Diabetes called this weekend and again tried to admonish me for cutting carbs out of my diet–other than those that come from fruits and vegetables and eating all the protein. I have kidney disease and decided to give up their stupid diet of “Whole grains and limit the fats and proteins” because I FELT SICK. Not just occasionally–but all the damn time. She works in a nursing home that has a lot of diabetics and diabetics with kidney disease and bases her “knowledge” off what she’s learned at work.

    I told her that maybe she should try it my way–since she’s obese and diabetic with heart disease. My weight has been on a roller coaster all my life but it’s slowly coming off because of diet and lifestyle changes.

    She told me she’s following her doctor’s advice but she hasn’t lost weight–her blood sugars are all over the place and she feels bad. Feels like crap most of the time. I told her she should try it my way for a month and see if there wasn’t any improvement but she won’t. Her doctor is god in her eyes…

    And the heck of it is, most doctors don’t know diddly about nutrition.

  33. Slade

    I agree with you completely on this. I don’t trust the medical associations or groups on alot of things. I think they want long-term customers. Perhaps not individual doctors, but I feel the associations do.

    Happy Anniversary!!! Hope both of you have a wonderful time!

    Thank you, we will.

  34. D.

    If you are paying a hospital for care, then it stands to reason that you should be able to eat whatever you want, and it should be served to you without question. If they won’t serve what you want, then you should be charged less for your stay, and then family or friends can bring you your meals. I wonder how much you are actually being charged for all that sugar and starch? It would be interesting to see a hospital bill with a breakdown of charges, including each meal. Yeah, I know, I’m dreaming.

    I haven’t stayed overnight in a hospital since I had salmonella poisoning around age 20. I hope to never stay in one again, but you’re right, you should be able to eat something besides the swill they serve.

  35. Cathryn

    Happy Anniversary! Enjoy your stay in Chicago!

    I am amazed, simply amazed. My friend who has Type 2 Diabetes called this weekend and again tried to admonish me for cutting carbs out of my diet–other than those that come from fruits and vegetables and eating all the protein. I have kidney disease and decided to give up their stupid diet of “Whole grains and limit the fats and proteins” because I FELT SICK. Not just occasionally–but all the damn time. She works in a nursing home that has a lot of diabetics and diabetics with kidney disease and bases her “knowledge” off what she’s learned at work.

    I told her that maybe she should try it my way–since she’s obese and diabetic with heart disease. My weight has been on a roller coaster all my life but it’s slowly coming off because of diet and lifestyle changes.

    She told me she’s following her doctor’s advice but she hasn’t lost weight–her blood sugars are all over the place and she feels bad. Feels like crap most of the time. I told her she should try it my way for a month and see if there wasn’t any improvement but she won’t. Her doctor is god in her eyes…

    And the heck of it is, most doctors don’t know diddly about nutrition.

  36. Slade

    I agree with you completely on this. I don’t trust the medical associations or groups on alot of things. I think they want long-term customers. Perhaps not individual doctors, but I feel the associations do.

    Happy Anniversary!!! Hope both of you have a wonderful time!

    Thank you, we will.

  37. D.

    If you are paying a hospital for care, then it stands to reason that you should be able to eat whatever you want, and it should be served to you without question. If they won’t serve what you want, then you should be charged less for your stay, and then family or friends can bring you your meals. I wonder how much you are actually being charged for all that sugar and starch? It would be interesting to see a hospital bill with a breakdown of charges, including each meal. Yeah, I know, I’m dreaming.

    I haven’t stayed overnight in a hospital since I had salmonella poisoning around age 20. I hope to never stay in one again, but you’re right, you should be able to eat something besides the swill they serve.

  38. Tracy

    When my mother-in-law was in the hospital recently, I was looking at her room service menu. It lists carbs, but I was very confused at first, because it had french fries as 1 carb. I had to look in the corner to see that 1 carb == 15 gms carbohydrate. As far as I can tell, I’ll want to avoid anything listing a carb, and anything with a heart by it if I’m ever there. But I am glad to be able to see it in advance, so I know what they’re doing. http://www.mercydesmoines.org/PDFs/AdultRoomServiceSept2009.pdf

    Strange definition of a “carb.”

  39. Tracy

    When my mother-in-law was in the hospital recently, I was looking at her room service menu. It lists carbs, but I was very confused at first, because it had french fries as 1 carb. I had to look in the corner to see that 1 carb == 15 gms carbohydrate. As far as I can tell, I’ll want to avoid anything listing a carb, and anything with a heart by it if I’m ever there. But I am glad to be able to see it in advance, so I know what they’re doing. http://www.mercydesmoines.org/PDFs/AdultRoomServiceSept2009.pdf

    Strange definition of a “carb.”

  40. mezzo

    I had to spend three days in hospital recently and got to choose my food every day. Breakfast was OK, they actually managed to give me my beloved Fromage Frais (high fat) and a piece of fruit. Well, the second day it was a banana, so I should have spelled it out for them…Lunch and dinner I tried once – maybe it was as good as institutional food gets, but that is still not very good. So I got my friends to bring me boiled eggs and veggies and stopped eating lunches and dinners. Three days is manageable but what happens to people who need to stay for four weeks? I shudder think.

    Cathryn: setting a good example works better than anything else. Maybe your friend will think again when she sees you losing weight and maybe you can show her your bloodwork someday. That may not convince her but it may plant the seeds of doubt in her mind.

  41. mezzo

    I had to spend three days in hospital recently and got to choose my food every day. Breakfast was OK, they actually managed to give me my beloved Fromage Frais (high fat) and a piece of fruit. Well, the second day it was a banana, so I should have spelled it out for them…Lunch and dinner I tried once – maybe it was as good as institutional food gets, but that is still not very good. So I got my friends to bring me boiled eggs and veggies and stopped eating lunches and dinners. Three days is manageable but what happens to people who need to stay for four weeks? I shudder think.

    Cathryn: setting a good example works better than anything else. Maybe your friend will think again when she sees you losing weight and maybe you can show her your bloodwork someday. That may not convince her but it may plant the seeds of doubt in her mind.

  42. Jeanne

    You can right click on the visual here, download it to your computer, then print it out. I did, and am sending it to some dieticians I know.

  43. Paul B.

    Great discussion here regarding hospital food. I was hospitalized exactly once–at age 8 to have my tonsils removed (they did that a lot back then). I do everything I possibly can to avoid going back, and hope I never do. Im sure hospitals are not inclined to offer low carb options, and even if they wanted to they probably couldn’t because any facility that gets federal funds has to follow the food pyramid. Whenever I visit friends or relatives in a hospital Im always horrified at the food. If, God forbid, I had to go to a hospital I would beg, pay, and threaten my friends to bring decent food in a couple of times a day. And heaven help the hospital employee who tries to stop me!

    I see a business opportunity: smuggling decent food into hospitals.

  44. Jeanne

    You can right click on the visual here, download it to your computer, then print it out. I did, and am sending it to some dieticians I know.

  45. Dave, RN

    I’ve got it hanging in my office now, but as an 8.5 by 11, the resolution isn’t too great. May the nm society will put a high resolution one on their website…

  46. Thom Brogan

    Happy Anniversary, Naughtons!

    Can’t wait to hear how the trip went and how the pizza tasted when you get back.

    I can tell you already the pizza was delicious.

  47. Paul B.

    Great discussion here regarding hospital food. I was hospitalized exactly once–at age 8 to have my tonsils removed (they did that a lot back then). I do everything I possibly can to avoid going back, and hope I never do. Im sure hospitals are not inclined to offer low carb options, and even if they wanted to they probably couldn’t because any facility that gets federal funds has to follow the food pyramid. Whenever I visit friends or relatives in a hospital Im always horrified at the food. If, God forbid, I had to go to a hospital I would beg, pay, and threaten my friends to bring decent food in a couple of times a day. And heaven help the hospital employee who tries to stop me!

    I see a business opportunity: smuggling decent food into hospitals.

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