Questions & Answers …

      63 Comments on Questions & Answers …

I frequently receive emails or comments from people who’ve seen Fat Head, asking me to provide information which, as it so happens, is often already available on this blog. I’m not complaining, mind you; I don’t click every link on every blog I visit either. But since these are common questions, I thought I’d answer them here and point out some links many readers may not have noticed.

I’d like to see the food log from your fast-food diet.  Is it available?

If I had a top-ten questions list, this would definitely be number one. Yes, my food log is available. It’s been over there in the Helpful Links section since day one. Unlike certain other documentary filmmakers (ahem, ahem), I’m not afraid to show you what I actually ate.

At the end of Fat Head, you went on a saturated-fat pigout diet for a month, but you didn’t say if you lost any weight. Did you gain or lose?

My bad. The purpose of that month was to see what effect pigging out on saturated fat while eliminating sugar and starch would have on my cholesterol. It was a sort of challenge put to me by Dr. Mike Eades, who told me off-camera I could prove for myself that the Lipid Hypothesis was wrong. I ate a lot of food, didn’t count calories, and didn’t exercise much at all because I was traveling quite a bit for business. But to answer the question, I lost another two pounds. I didn’t mention that in the film because it was the cholesterol score that mattered, at least to me. (If you haven’t seen the film — and why the heck not?! — my total cholesterol and LDL dropped, while my HDL went up. Just what Dr. Mike predicted.)

Have you kept the weight off that you lost while filming Fat Head?

Nope. I’ve kept the fat off. There’s a difference. I went down to 194 lbs. on the fast-food diet, then down to 192 after the saturated-fat pigout diet. Once I started lifting weights using Fred Hahn’s Slow Burn method, I went back up over 200 even as my pants got a little looser. At the end of the 6-Week Cure diet, I weighed 195. Now I’m at 200, but my waist is the same size as when I weighed 195 in November. As long as I keep lifting weights and watching my diet, I’m not really concerned with reaching some magical number on the scale.

Do you have any sources for your claim that there’s no real scientific proof saturated fat and cholesterol cause heart disease? (I get that one a lot, sometimes phrased in not-very-polite terms that involve references to bovine droppings.)

Naw, I made it up. Seemed like a cool idea for a film. Yes, yes, yes, there’s a ton of literature out there supporting the claim. If you’re not up to reading Good Calories, Bad Calories, you can at least check the Recommended Reading links over there in the sidebar. A few of my favorites are:

Gary Taubes: The Soft Science of Dietary Fat
Gary Taubes: What If It’s All Been A Big Fat Lie?
Dr. Malcolm Kendrick on the Cholesterol Myths
What if “bad” fat is really good for you?

Those are some of the articles I stumbled across when I first started doing research for the film. Up until then, I hadn’t really planned for Fat Head to delve into what’s wrong with the standard nutrition advice. After reading the articles, I went a little nuts ordering books and downloading articles.

Where do you find low-carb recipes? Why don’t you post recipes?

I’m not really a recipe guy. I’m a seat-of-the-pants cook. I cook, taste, and add flavors as I go. (So does my five-year-old. She recently tasted some homemade soup and informed my wife it needed a bit more salt and some cumin.)

But there are good recipes on other sites I have linked:

NZ Low Carb Info and Recipes
Low-Carb Cooking (New Zealand)
Well Done Chef!

If anyone out there knows of other sites with good low-carb recipes, do tell. I don’t have them linked, but I’d also highly recommend a couple of low-carb cookbooks that my wife uses frequently. The biggest complaint I hear about low-carb diets is the lack of variety. Well, sure, if you do nothing but rotate eggs, steaks and cheeseburgers, it’s going to get boring. So don’t. Get these books and go to town.

Carb Wars, by Judy Barnes Baker (The moussaka is awesome.)

1001 Low-Carb Recipes, by Dana Carpender (Two words: barbeque sauce! Seriously, if you can’t find something you like in a book that contains a thousand recipes, it’s time to just give up and go back to killing yourself with sugar.)

How did you manage to marry that woman? (Yes, people have actually emailed to ask me that question. Maybe I should feel insulted …)

The short answer: no idea. But a friend and former co-worker named Amy once offered an explanation:  Amy knew me when I was engaged to another woman I’ll call Melanie. To put it mildly, the engagement didn’t work out well … mostly because just about the time I thought I was finished dealing with all the baggage Melanie was carrying around from childhood, it turned out she owned an entire storage facility I knew nothing about. So when I met my wife a couple of years later and wondered how I got so lucky, Amy said, “I think it’s God apologizing for Melanie.”

That’s as good an explanation as any other.


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63 thoughts on “Questions & Answers …

  1. TWV

    Another question, I know it has been asked before but I haven’t seen an answer or missed it: What’s the deal with Netflix and Fat Head? It seems like it has been put into limbo. If it wasn’t for Netflix, I would have never seen the movie in the first place. Your movie helped me figure things out and start me down a different road (45 pounds lost since middle of Febuary).

    Congratulations on the weight loss, and I’m delighted to know Fat Head was part of the inspiration. I’ll check the Netflix situation again. Last I heard, they just weren’t stocking enough copies.

  2. Jan

    I’ve just added a low carb subcategory in the recipe section of my blog – I was surprised at how many recipes I’d posted were already low(er) carb before I decided to do this in earnest. And the vast majority of the recipes I post (usually 2 – 3 a week) will be low carb going forward. My biggest problem with eating a controlled carbohydrate diet is the fact we seem to fall into the whole eggs/grilled meat/salad thing over and over and over again, and I’ve challenged myself to keep my diet varied and exciting. I also want to show my regular readers (two of which are vegetarians and most of the rest think low fat is the way to go) that low carb does not mean an endless parade of fatty fried meats and eggs and nothing else.

    As for your wife, perhaps she’s simply a woman of intelligence and taste?

    I prefer your theory about my wife. Since our ten-year anniversary is coming up, it’s unlikely I’ve got her hoodwinked or anything.

  3. Elenor

    “Now I’m at 200, but my waist is the same size as when I weighed 195 in November.”

    Where’s the beef(cake)?! Where’s the beef(cake)?!

    Come on Tom, teasing us by painting word pictures, but not postin’ salacious pix of you with your shirt off?!?!

    {wink}

    Maybe if I go back to hard drinking ….

  4. Maria

    Fantastic! I loved your movie and just passed it on to some relatives. This will be a great follow up, thanks!

    Thank you for watching the film.

  5. Kelly the Kitchen Kop

    I’ve got another question, and you may remember that I’ve hounded you about this before…

    I love subscribing to blogs via email (if they don’t pop into my inbox I just don’t get to them) and I wonder why oh why you don’t have a link here so I can subscribe to yours?!!

    I’ll try to wait a couple months before I ask you again… 🙂

    Kelly

    I haven’t gotten around to finding a subscribe-to plug-in for WordPress. Anyone know which is best … or easiest?

  6. TWV

    Another question, I know it has been asked before but I haven’t seen an answer or missed it: What’s the deal with Netflix and Fat Head? It seems like it has been put into limbo. If it wasn’t for Netflix, I would have never seen the movie in the first place. Your movie helped me figure things out and start me down a different road (45 pounds lost since middle of Febuary).

    Congratulations on the weight loss, and I’m delighted to know Fat Head was part of the inspiration. I’ll check the Netflix situation again. Last I heard, they just weren’t stocking enough copies.

  7. Jan

    I’ve just added a low carb subcategory in the recipe section of my blog – I was surprised at how many recipes I’d posted were already low(er) carb before I decided to do this in earnest. And the vast majority of the recipes I post (usually 2 – 3 a week) will be low carb going forward. My biggest problem with eating a controlled carbohydrate diet is the fact we seem to fall into the whole eggs/grilled meat/salad thing over and over and over again, and I’ve challenged myself to keep my diet varied and exciting. I also want to show my regular readers (two of which are vegetarians and most of the rest think low fat is the way to go) that low carb does not mean an endless parade of fatty fried meats and eggs and nothing else.

    As for your wife, perhaps she’s simply a woman of intelligence and taste?

    I prefer your theory about my wife. Since our ten-year anniversary is coming up, it’s unlikely I’ve got her hoodwinked or anything.

  8. Elenor

    “Now I’m at 200, but my waist is the same size as when I weighed 195 in November.”

    Where’s the beef(cake)?! Where’s the beef(cake)?!

    Come on Tom, teasing us by painting word pictures, but not postin’ salacious pix of you with your shirt off?!?!

    {wink}

    Maybe if I go back to hard drinking ….

  9. Maria

    Fantastic! I loved your movie and just passed it on to some relatives. This will be a great follow up, thanks!

    Thank you for watching the film.

  10. Lori

    “…just about the time I thought I was finished dealing with all the baggage Melanie was carrying around from childhood, it turned out she owned an entire storage facility I knew nothing about. So when I met my wife a couple of years later and wondered how I got so lucky, Amy said, ‘I think it’s God apologizing for Melanie.'”

    Ah yes, prana-suckers. Been there.

    Not a great place to be, either. I believe Julia Cameron refers to them as “crazy-makers.”

  11. Kelly

    Recipes: I’m a big fan of Kalyn’s Kitchen. She’s on South Beach herself so sometimes she cuts out more fat than I would prefer, but hers is my go-to site for all sorts of vegetable recipes. Last summer, we got a Farm Share and she helped us get through the resulting huge piles of zucchini without getting bored. The site is: http://kalynskitchen.blogspot.com/. You can search by ingredient.

  12. Kelly the Kitchen Kop

    I’ve got another question, and you may remember that I’ve hounded you about this before…

    I love subscribing to blogs via email (if they don’t pop into my inbox I just don’t get to them) and I wonder why oh why you don’t have a link here so I can subscribe to yours?!!

    I’ll try to wait a couple months before I ask you again… 🙂

    Kelly

    I haven’t gotten around to finding a subscribe-to plug-in for WordPress. Anyone know which is best … or easiest?

  13. Janet (Pantry Bites)

    I like your comments about not worrying too much about the numbers on the scale. Muscle does weight more than fat and I generally focus on how my clothes fit and rarely jump on the scale.

    For the most part, I know that eating low carb is more than about weight loss but about feeling good eating real food.

    Exactly; it’s about health. I seem to have reached homeostasis with a little more fat on me than I’d prefer, but it’s way less than I’d be carrying around if I didn’t watch my carbs. More importantly, I feel strong and healthy.

  14. Lori

    “…just about the time I thought I was finished dealing with all the baggage Melanie was carrying around from childhood, it turned out she owned an entire storage facility I knew nothing about. So when I met my wife a couple of years later and wondered how I got so lucky, Amy said, ‘I think it’s God apologizing for Melanie.'”

    Ah yes, prana-suckers. Been there.

    Not a great place to be, either. I believe Julia Cameron refers to them as “crazy-makers.”

  15. Kelly

    Recipes: I’m a big fan of Kalyn’s Kitchen. She’s on South Beach herself so sometimes she cuts out more fat than I would prefer, but hers is my go-to site for all sorts of vegetable recipes. Last summer, we got a Farm Share and she helped us get through the resulting huge piles of zucchini without getting bored. The site is: http://kalynskitchen.blogspot.com/. You can search by ingredient.

  16. Janet (Pantry Bites)

    I like your comments about not worrying too much about the numbers on the scale. Muscle does weight more than fat and I generally focus on how my clothes fit and rarely jump on the scale.

    For the most part, I know that eating low carb is more than about weight loss but about feeling good eating real food.

    Exactly; it’s about health. I seem to have reached homeostasis with a little more fat on me than I’d prefer, but it’s way less than I’d be carrying around if I didn’t watch my carbs. More importantly, I feel strong and healthy.

  17. KD

    Your kid is way ahead of the game. Just a few months ago, and I’m in my late 20s, I’d only heard of cumin before and seen it listed in ingredients, but I wouldn’t have been able to identify it until I rather recently started making my own spice mixes. When I first tasted a bit of cumin on its own, it was, “Aha! That’s what makes up the majority of the taste of taco seasoning!” And now it’s the spice I use the most; I’m quite fond of its flavor.

    She likes to create her own soup recipes, and she’s very opinionated about spices.

    I lived alone most of my adult life, never had cumin in the cabinet, never even heard of the stuff.

  18. KD

    Your kid is way ahead of the game. Just a few months ago, and I’m in my late 20s, I’d only heard of cumin before and seen it listed in ingredients, but I wouldn’t have been able to identify it until I rather recently started making my own spice mixes. When I first tasted a bit of cumin on its own, it was, “Aha! That’s what makes up the majority of the taste of taco seasoning!” And now it’s the spice I use the most; I’m quite fond of its flavor.

    She likes to create her own soup recipes, and she’s very opinionated about spices.

    I lived alone most of my adult life, never had cumin in the cabinet, never even heard of the stuff.

  19. T

    Looking at the below studies, it seems that your small drop in cholesterol was most likely related with loss of body weight. The average person does not realise that any means of weight loss will usually allow for at least a small drop in cholesterol, which is why the average viewer/reading will believe that you proved that the Lipid Hypothesis is wrong. However the studies below also show that many others on low-carb diets have actually seen their cholesterol levels rise despite loosing weight.

    From http://www.atkinsdietalert.org/advisory.html#concerns

    Heart disease. Generally speaking, weight loss tends to reduce cholesterol levels, while saturated fat and cholesterol tend to raise them.18,19 Consequently, the effect on cholesterol levels of a low-carbohydrate weight-loss diet that includes saturated fat and cholesterol can vary from person to person.5,20-23 In some studies, about 30% of people on low-carbohydrate diets showed an increase in cholesterol levels, despite their weight loss.21,23

    19. Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). National Cholesterol Education Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health. NIH Publication No. 02-5212, September, 2002.
    20. LaRosa JC, Fry AG, Muesing R, Rosing DR. Effects of high-protein, low-carbohydrate dieting on plasma lipoproteins and body weight. J Am Dietetic Asso 1980;77:264-70.
    21. Westman EC, Yancy WS, Edman JS, Tomlin KF, Perkins CE. Effect of 6-month adherence to a very low carbohydrate diet program. Am J Med 2002;113:30-6.
    22. Yancy WS, Olsen MK, Guyton JR, Bakst RP, Westman EC. A low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-fat diet to treat obesity and hyperlipidemia. Ann Int Med 2004;140:769-777.
    23. Nestel PJ, Shige H, Pomeroy S, Cehun M, Chin-Dusting J. Post-prandial remnant lipids impair arterial compliance. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001;37:1929-35.

    The following link have references to studies comparing several diets and decreases in LDL. It also shows that a very-high-fiber vegetable, fruit and nut diet can lower LDL by 33%, which is a greater decrease than what can be achieved on cholesterol lowering medicine.

    http://www.all-creatures.org/health/whatis.html

    I lost a whopping two pounds, which isn’t enough to induce a significant change in my lipid profile. Meanwhile, LDL dropped from 156 to 130 and HDL increased from 49 to 64.

    Dietary cholesterol intake has no effect on plasma cholesterol levels. Even Ancel Keys finally admitted that. Saturated can fat raise LDL in some people, but in the absence of refined carbohydrates, it also shifts the LDL pattern from small and dense (dangerous) to large and fluffy (not dangerous).

    You might try reading the studies instead of misinterpretations of them published on vegan websites. A rise in HDL and drop in TG is a marker for larger, fluffier LDL. If you check the study you quoted in (22), you’ll see that in the ketogenic group, HDL increased (5 mg/dl), while in the low-fat group, it decreased (-1.6 mg/dl). LDL increased a WHOPPING 1.6 mg/dl in the ketogenic group, while dropping (-7.4 mg/dl) in the low-fat group. In the ketogenic group, triglycerides plummeted (-74.2 mg/dl), which was nearly three times the decrease in the low-fat group (-27.9 mg/dL). If you actually understand anything about lipid profiles, you can only conclude that the ketogenic diet kicked the low-fat diet’s ass in this study.

    The study data for (21) show that for the group on a ketogenic diet, fasting glucose dropped 17%, triglycerides dropped 42%, total LDL increased 10%, and HDL increased 8%. Again, those numbers would demonstrate an improved lipid profile, especially since TG dropped by nearly half. The goofs on the vegetarian site would only point the 10% rise in LDL, which is meaningless given the increase in HDL and the huge decrease in TG.

    You’re not actually going to quote the National Cholesterol Education Campaign as an unbiased authority, are you? Most of the committee members were paid consultants for statin-makers. I spoke with Kilmer McCulley (look him up) on the phone while producing Fat Head. He attended NCEC meetings and described them as “disgusting.” Dissenting voices (and there were many) were ignored, consensus was manufactured, and the now-enshrined recommendation of cholesterol below 200 was selected because the human average of 220 wouldn’t create millions of new customers for statins.

  20. T

    Looking at the below studies, it seems that your small drop in cholesterol was most likely related with loss of body weight. The average person does not realise that any means of weight loss will usually allow for at least a small drop in cholesterol, which is why the average viewer/reading will believe that you proved that the Lipid Hypothesis is wrong. However the studies below also show that many others on low-carb diets have actually seen their cholesterol levels rise despite loosing weight.

    From http://www.atkinsdietalert.org/advisory.html#concerns

    Heart disease. Generally speaking, weight loss tends to reduce cholesterol levels, while saturated fat and cholesterol tend to raise them.18,19 Consequently, the effect on cholesterol levels of a low-carbohydrate weight-loss diet that includes saturated fat and cholesterol can vary from person to person.5,20-23 In some studies, about 30% of people on low-carbohydrate diets showed an increase in cholesterol levels, despite their weight loss.21,23

    19. Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). National Cholesterol Education Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health. NIH Publication No. 02-5212, September, 2002.
    20. LaRosa JC, Fry AG, Muesing R, Rosing DR. Effects of high-protein, low-carbohydrate dieting on plasma lipoproteins and body weight. J Am Dietetic Asso 1980;77:264-70.
    21. Westman EC, Yancy WS, Edman JS, Tomlin KF, Perkins CE. Effect of 6-month adherence to a very low carbohydrate diet program. Am J Med 2002;113:30-6.
    22. Yancy WS, Olsen MK, Guyton JR, Bakst RP, Westman EC. A low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-fat diet to treat obesity and hyperlipidemia. Ann Int Med 2004;140:769-777.
    23. Nestel PJ, Shige H, Pomeroy S, Cehun M, Chin-Dusting J. Post-prandial remnant lipids impair arterial compliance. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001;37:1929-35.

    The following link have references to studies comparing several diets and decreases in LDL. It also shows that a very-high-fiber vegetable, fruit and nut diet can lower LDL by 33%, which is a greater decrease than what can be achieved on cholesterol lowering medicine.

    http://www.all-creatures.org/health/whatis.html

    I lost a whopping two pounds, which isn’t enough to induce a significant change in my lipid profile. Meanwhile, LDL dropped from 156 to 130 and HDL increased from 49 to 64.

    Dietary cholesterol intake has no effect on plasma cholesterol levels. Even Ancel Keys finally admitted that. Saturated can fat raise LDL in some people, but in the absence of refined carbohydrates, it also shifts the LDL pattern from small and dense (dangerous) to large and fluffy (not dangerous).

    You might try reading the studies instead of misinterpretations of them published on vegan websites. A rise in HDL and drop in TG is a marker for larger, fluffier LDL. If you check the study you quoted in (22), you’ll see that in the ketogenic group, HDL increased (5 mg/dl), while in the low-fat group, it decreased (-1.6 mg/dl). LDL increased a WHOPPING 1.6 mg/dl in the ketogenic group, while dropping (-7.4 mg/dl) in the low-fat group. In the ketogenic group, triglycerides plummeted (-74.2 mg/dl), which was nearly three times the decrease in the low-fat group (-27.9 mg/dL). If you actually understand anything about lipid profiles, you can only conclude that the ketogenic diet kicked the low-fat diet’s ass in this study.

    The study data for (21) show that for the group on a ketogenic diet, fasting glucose dropped 17%, triglycerides dropped 42%, total LDL increased 10%, and HDL increased 8%. Again, those numbers would demonstrate an improved lipid profile, especially since TG dropped by nearly half. The goofs on the vegetarian site would only point the 10% rise in LDL, which is meaningless given the increase in HDL and the huge decrease in TG.

    You’re not actually going to quote the National Cholesterol Education Campaign as an unbiased authority, are you? Most of the committee members were paid consultants for statin-makers. I spoke with Kilmer McCulley (look him up) on the phone while producing Fat Head. He attended NCEC meetings and described them as “disgusting.” Dissenting voices (and there were many) were ignored, consensus was manufactured, and the now-enshrined recommendation of cholesterol below 200 was selected because the human average of 220 wouldn’t create millions of new customers for statins.

  21. Jake

    I hate the Google Ads that are in left hand corner of your site, because they often advertise the very weight loss food that you are criticizing! “Discover Low Fat Recipes,” “High Fructose Corn Syrup Myths,” etc.

    Yeah, those are some strange choices. Google’s ad-placement software fills those spaces. We don’t have any role in picking them. Seems like a waste of space for the advertisers in many cases.

  22. Prue

    Thanks for the mention Tom. The Cafe forum part of the website is buzzing too. You have many fans in NZ; growing every time Fat Head is screened. Are any other countries screening it too?

    Israel, France, Turkey, Poland and South Africa so far. Can’t seem to crack the TV market in my own country yet

  23. Jake

    I hate the Google Ads that are in left hand corner of your site, because they often advertise the very weight loss food that you are criticizing! “Discover Low Fat Recipes,” “High Fructose Corn Syrup Myths,” etc.

    Yeah, those are some strange choices. Google’s ad-placement software fills those spaces. We don’t have any role in picking them. Seems like a waste of space for the advertisers in many cases.

  24. Prue

    Thanks for the mention Tom. The Cafe forum part of the website is buzzing too. You have many fans in NZ; growing every time Fat Head is screened. Are any other countries screening it too?

    Israel, France, Turkey, Poland and South Africa so far. Can’t seem to crack the TV market in my own country yet

  25. DAR

    I’m a diabetic who has been eating low carb and testing my BGL after every meal for over 7 years. I dream up very low carb recipes to share with others who want variety in their low carb lifestyles.

    You can find my recipes and other info at http://dardreams.spaces.live.com.

  26. DAR

    I’m a diabetic who has been eating low carb and testing my BGL after every meal for over 7 years. I dream up very low carb recipes to share with others who want variety in their low carb lifestyles.

    You can find my recipes and other info at http://dardreams.spaces.live.com.

  27. Anders

    The experts tells me that it’s impossible to gain more than 10 pounds muscle mass during a year unless your using illegal substances. And you gained 8 pounds in a few months time?
    I lifted weights for 4 months while i was on a no carb diet. Lost 26 pounds, where 1.1 pounds was muscles according to an Inbody 720 analysis.
    How did you measure that all of your weight gain was caused by increased muscle mass?

    I’m not working for the Inbody company, but maybe you should try it once?

    Definitely no illegal substances. I’ve never heard about a 10-pound limit; where does that figure come from? An article I read on protein turnover put the theoretical limit at 1 pound per week.

    I don’t do anything scientific to measure muscle mass vs. fat. I keep track of my waist measurement … the mirror is a pretty good guide as well.

    What is Inbody?

  28. Anders

    You can read about Inbody here: http://www.derwenthealthcare.com/inbody/inbody-720

    Looks pretty high-tech, but I’m not all that interested in getting exact percentages of body fat, muscle mass, etc., for the same reason I didn’t bother trying to measure visceral vs. subcutaneous fat for the 6 Week Cure program: calculating the figures doesn’t change the results. It’s just a measurement.

  29. Anders

    or here: http://www.londonmedical.co.uk/sites/londonmedical/images/files/LM%20Leaflet%20Body%20Comp%20Test%20FINAL.pdf

    A google search can help you find a place to take the test, if you’re interessted. I’m almost only getting google results in norwegian, which is of no use for you. Maybe you’ll get better results by searching for yourself.

    I don’t know where this 10 pound limit comes from, but I’ve heard about people gaining 15 pounds after intensive weight lifting, but when testing with the Inbody machine they realize that maybe only 3-5 of those pounds actually are mucles. And the rest is fat.

    Isn’t there something about weight-training that causes muscles to retain more water? I swear I read something about that once, but I don’t have a reference.

  30. Anders

    You are right that it is only a measurement, but it helped me mentally. Now I know that I don’t have to starve myself down to 80kg (176lbs) as the “experts” would say. But this machine showed me that my ideal weight is 98.8kg (217.4lbs) because of my 48kg (105.6lbs) muscle mass 🙂
    So according to BMI I’ll always be overweight. Unless I starve myself down a lot of pounds in muscle mass (which the “experts” probably would recommend me)

    Well, you know my opinion of the BMI …

  31. eddie watts

    the 10 pound limit a year is BS frankly. maybe if you’re a longterm lifter whose been building muscle for 5 years plus then yeah sure, otherwise the maximum will vary from person to person massively.

    I would suspect the biggest gains occur early on. That’s what happened in my case. I also noticed a difference in strength gains when I started drinking protein shakes after workouts.

  32. eddie watts

    and to back that up i give you this

    http://startingstrength.com/resources/forum/showthread.php?t=15386

    a guy who gained 78 pounds in 6 months of which 46 pounds are muscle.
    yes there was excess fat gained too, but as fat is easier to lose than muscle is to gain this was deemed acceptable.

    also note the food intake was considerable and he was a very skinny 20 year old at the start, so arguably the best situation to be in to gain lots of muscle

  33. Anders

    The experts tells me that it’s impossible to gain more than 10 pounds muscle mass during a year unless your using illegal substances. And you gained 8 pounds in a few months time?
    I lifted weights for 4 months while i was on a no carb diet. Lost 26 pounds, where 1.1 pounds was muscles according to an Inbody 720 analysis.
    How did you measure that all of your weight gain was caused by increased muscle mass?

    I’m not working for the Inbody company, but maybe you should try it once?

    Definitely no illegal substances. I’ve never heard about a 10-pound limit; where does that figure come from? An article I read on protein turnover put the theoretical limit at 1 pound per week.

    I don’t do anything scientific to measure muscle mass vs. fat. I keep track of my waist measurement … the mirror is a pretty good guide as well.

    What is Inbody?

  34. Anders

    You can read about Inbody here: http://www.derwenthealthcare.com/inbody/inbody-720

    Looks pretty high-tech, but I’m not all that interested in getting exact percentages of body fat, muscle mass, etc., for the same reason I didn’t bother trying to measure visceral vs. subcutaneous fat for the 6 Week Cure program: calculating the figures doesn’t change the results. It’s just a measurement.

  35. Anders

    or here: http://www.londonmedical.co.uk/sites/londonmedical/images/files/LM%20Leaflet%20Body%20Comp%20Test%20FINAL.pdf

    A google search can help you find a place to take the test, if you’re interessted. I’m almost only getting google results in norwegian, which is of no use for you. Maybe you’ll get better results by searching for yourself.

    I don’t know where this 10 pound limit comes from, but I’ve heard about people gaining 15 pounds after intensive weight lifting, but when testing with the Inbody machine they realize that maybe only 3-5 of those pounds actually are mucles. And the rest is fat.

    Isn’t there something about weight-training that causes muscles to retain more water? I swear I read something about that once, but I don’t have a reference.

  36. Anders

    You are right that it is only a measurement, but it helped me mentally. Now I know that I don’t have to starve myself down to 80kg (176lbs) as the “experts” would say. But this machine showed me that my ideal weight is 98.8kg (217.4lbs) because of my 48kg (105.6lbs) muscle mass 🙂
    So according to BMI I’ll always be overweight. Unless I starve myself down a lot of pounds in muscle mass (which the “experts” probably would recommend me)

    Well, you know my opinion of the BMI …

  37. eddie watts

    the 10 pound limit a year is BS frankly. maybe if you’re a longterm lifter whose been building muscle for 5 years plus then yeah sure, otherwise the maximum will vary from person to person massively.

    I would suspect the biggest gains occur early on. That’s what happened in my case. I also noticed a difference in strength gains when I started drinking protein shakes after workouts.

  38. eddie watts

    and to back that up i give you this

    http://startingstrength.com/resources/forum/showthread.php?t=15386

    a guy who gained 78 pounds in 6 months of which 46 pounds are muscle.
    yes there was excess fat gained too, but as fat is easier to lose than muscle is to gain this was deemed acceptable.

    also note the food intake was considerable and he was a very skinny 20 year old at the start, so arguably the best situation to be in to gain lots of muscle

  39. T

    An increase in LDL is nothing to worry about due to the fact that HDL increased? Has this actually been demonstrated in a study where heart disease has been reversed? Have cholesterol levels you reached on your recommended diet similar to the levels of the patients in studies where they have reversed severe heart disease?

    In studies that have actually proved reversal of severe heart disease such as Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., MD study that has been on going since 1985, the patients have relatively low HDL levels. It seems that your body does not have a requirement to produce a larger amount of HDL when not consuming a diet based around saturated fat and low in whole plant foods. Triglycerides were also not super low. While these numbers may have some importance, this study showed a total cholesterol of below 150 and LDL below 100 (or maybe even 80) is what is desirable to prevent and even reverse heart disease.
    http://www.heartattackproof.com/reversal01.htm

    Although low-fat vegetarian diets have been proven to reverse severe heart disease and other chronic illnesses such as type II diabetes, there is room for improvement as these diets tend to greatly restrict nut and seed consumption and also tend to focus too much on grains rather than on high nutrient plant foods that would lower blood sugar levels, triglycerides and LDL levels even further.
    A more aggressive vegetable based diet, with fruit and nuts can lower LDL to below levels that can be achieved on medication. You largely ignored this study in my last post, so I have attached a direct link to the study.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11288049

    The human cholesterol average is not 220! You always tend to ignore billions of people around the would when it suits you bias views! You will also need to make up some excuse as to why so many other governments around the world also recommend restricting the foods you recommend as well as their recommendations to keep cholesterol below similar levels.

    “Weve never had a heart attack in Framingham in 35 years in anyone who had a cholesterol level under 150. Three-quarters of the people who live on the face of this Earth never have a heart attack. They live in Asia, Africa, and South America, and their cholesterols are all around 150.h Dr. William Castelli, Medical Director of the Framingham Cardiovascular Institute in Massachusetts; Harvard Medical School
    The first link also pointed out how 35% of the people who had coronary artery disease in Framingham actually had a total cholesterol level between 150 and 200, showing that this recommended level of 200 is still far to high.

    From the China Study where “Coronary artery disease mortality was 16.7-fold greater for US men and 5.6-fold greater for US women than for their Chinese counterparts” and other chronic diseases as a whole is far lower than the US:
    The average level of blood cholesterol was only 127 mg/dl, which is almost 100 points less than the American average (215 mg/dl). …Some counties had average levels as low as 94 mg/dl. …For two groups of about twenty-five women in the inner part of China, average blood cholesterol was at the amazingly low level of 80 mg/dl.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9860369

    As for using bias sources, this is really rich coming from someone who uses groups who “protect farmers” such as the Weston A Price Foundation to try and prove their view.

    And for misinterpretations and failing to mentioning things, what about a certain movie who tried to bash Nathan Pritikin’s and failed to mention that his autopsy results that were published in the New England Journal of Medicine proved that he reversed his heart disease that he had prior to starting his diet. This movie also tried to blame that he commuted suicide due to his low fat diet rather than the fact that he chose suicide over going onto life support as he was deteriorating from his long battle with leukemia that began long before starting his diet.
    http://gorillaprotein.com/Nathan_Pritikin.html

    How exactly is “Pritikin came down with leukemia and committed suicide” misleading? Are you actually that stupid, or merely suggesting everyone else is?

    What the first link shows is not that 200 is too high; it shows that cholesterol levels are a lousy predictor for heart disease. So the rate of heart disease is lower if total cholesterol is below 150? Well, that’s just fabulous! — until you do some research and learn that people with cholesterol that low have a HIGHER mortality rate. People with higher cholesterol live LONGER on average. If you tried to force my cholesterol below 150, I’d shoot you through the head. I don’t want to die of cancer, respiratory failure, or stroke, and all are far more common among those with low cholesterol. What your vegan propaganda pals haven’t told you is that among the Japanese — you know, low heart disease and low cholesterol and all that? — the rate of stroke is screamingly high.

    Your opinions are based on vegan propaganda. You really need to read some alternative sources. Look at the MONICA data if you’re such a diligent researcher (and then try to tell me it’s natural for humans to have cholesterol of 90) and try to spot any pattern whatsoever. Aborigines, with the lowest average cholesterol in the world, have a screamingly high rate of heart disease. The French and Swiss, with average cholesterol well over 220, have far lower rates of heart disease than the U.S. or U.K. There is simply no association. I ran the MONICA data through the CORR function in Excel and got back a slight NEGATIVE correlation between cholesterol levels and heart disease.

    If you want to live on a vegan diet of nuts and twigs and force your cholesterol down to 120 in the belief that you’ll live longer, please, be my guest. But you’re operating on a belief system that is more religion than science. If you want to keep wasting your typing fingers trying to convince me I should live on a vegan diet and get my cholesterol down to, oh, 100 or so, once again, be my guest. But since I’ve done the research, including reading your vegan propaganda sites whenever I need a laugh, don’t get your hopes up.

  40. T

    An increase in LDL is nothing to worry about due to the fact that HDL increased? Has this actually been demonstrated in a study where heart disease has been reversed? Have cholesterol levels you reached on your recommended diet similar to the levels of the patients in studies where they have reversed severe heart disease?

    In studies that have actually proved reversal of severe heart disease such as Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., MD study that has been on going since 1985, the patients have relatively low HDL levels. It seems that your body does not have a requirement to produce a larger amount of HDL when not consuming a diet based around saturated fat and low in whole plant foods. Triglycerides were also not super low. While these numbers may have some importance, this study showed a total cholesterol of below 150 and LDL below 100 (or maybe even 80) is what is desirable to prevent and even reverse heart disease.
    http://www.heartattackproof.com/reversal01.htm

    Although low-fat vegetarian diets have been proven to reverse severe heart disease and other chronic illnesses such as type II diabetes, there is room for improvement as these diets tend to greatly restrict nut and seed consumption and also tend to focus too much on grains rather than on high nutrient plant foods that would lower blood sugar levels, triglycerides and LDL levels even further.
    A more aggressive vegetable based diet, with fruit and nuts can lower LDL to below levels that can be achieved on medication. You largely ignored this study in my last post, so I have attached a direct link to the study.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11288049

    The human cholesterol average is not 220! You always tend to ignore billions of people around the would when it suits you bias views! You will also need to make up some excuse as to why so many other governments around the world also recommend restricting the foods you recommend as well as their recommendations to keep cholesterol below similar levels.

    “Weve never had a heart attack in Framingham in 35 years in anyone who had a cholesterol level under 150. Three-quarters of the people who live on the face of this Earth never have a heart attack. They live in Asia, Africa, and South America, and their cholesterols are all around 150.h Dr. William Castelli, Medical Director of the Framingham Cardiovascular Institute in Massachusetts; Harvard Medical School
    The first link also pointed out how 35% of the people who had coronary artery disease in Framingham actually had a total cholesterol level between 150 and 200, showing that this recommended level of 200 is still far to high.

    From the China Study where “Coronary artery disease mortality was 16.7-fold greater for US men and 5.6-fold greater for US women than for their Chinese counterparts” and other chronic diseases as a whole is far lower than the US:
    The average level of blood cholesterol was only 127 mg/dl, which is almost 100 points less than the American average (215 mg/dl). …Some counties had average levels as low as 94 mg/dl. …For two groups of about twenty-five women in the inner part of China, average blood cholesterol was at the amazingly low level of 80 mg/dl.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9860369

    As for using bias sources, this is really rich coming from someone who uses groups who “protect farmers” such as the Weston A Price Foundation to try and prove their view.

    And for misinterpretations and failing to mentioning things, what about a certain movie who tried to bash Nathan Pritikin’s and failed to mention that his autopsy results that were published in the New England Journal of Medicine proved that he reversed his heart disease that he had prior to starting his diet. This movie also tried to blame that he commuted suicide due to his low fat diet rather than the fact that he chose suicide over going onto life support as he was deteriorating from his long battle with leukemia that began long before starting his diet.
    http://gorillaprotein.com/Nathan_Pritikin.html

    How exactly is “Pritikin came down with leukemia and committed suicide” misleading? Are you actually that stupid, or merely suggesting everyone else is?

    What the first link shows is not that 200 is too high; it shows that cholesterol levels are a lousy predictor for heart disease. So the rate of heart disease is lower if total cholesterol is below 150? Well, that’s just fabulous! — until you do some research and learn that people with cholesterol that low have a HIGHER mortality rate. People with higher cholesterol live LONGER on average. If you tried to force my cholesterol below 150, I’d shoot you through the head. I don’t want to die of cancer, respiratory failure, or stroke, and all are far more common among those with low cholesterol. What your vegan propaganda pals haven’t told you is that among the Japanese — you know, low heart disease and low cholesterol and all that? — the rate of stroke is screamingly high.

    Your opinions are based on vegan propaganda. You really need to read some alternative sources. Look at the MONICA data if you’re such a diligent researcher (and then try to tell me it’s natural for humans to have cholesterol of 90) and try to spot any pattern whatsoever. Aborigines, with the lowest average cholesterol in the world, have a screamingly high rate of heart disease. The French and Swiss, with average cholesterol well over 220, have far lower rates of heart disease than the U.S. or U.K. There is simply no association. I ran the MONICA data through the CORR function in Excel and got back a slight NEGATIVE correlation between cholesterol levels and heart disease.

    If you want to live on a vegan diet of nuts and twigs and force your cholesterol down to 120 in the belief that you’ll live longer, please, be my guest. But you’re operating on a belief system that is more religion than science. If you want to keep wasting your typing fingers trying to convince me I should live on a vegan diet and get my cholesterol down to, oh, 100 or so, once again, be my guest. But since I’ve done the research, including reading your vegan propaganda sites whenever I need a laugh, don’t get your hopes up.

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