Good Math Slices Bad Bologna

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My sophomore year in college, I took an Introduction to Humanities course (which I enjoyed very much), and was pleased when I walked into class one day and found that my physics professor was giving a guest lecture.

“Doc,” as we called him, was a major science wonk. He held PhDs in physics and mathematics and taught courses in both disciplines, as well as freshman chemistry. No matter what the class, his lectures frequently took unexpected side trips into anthropology, biology, astronomy – well, heck, you name it, and he knew it. Probably the only other person I’ve met who reads as many books per year is Dr. Mike Eades.

Doc’s guest lecture was about the need for general scientific literacy, and he told us at one point, “No matter what field you plan to go into, learn math. Math is how you know when you’re being lied to.”

I agree wholeheartedly. Trouble is, math just plain scares a lot of people. Stick a couple of x’s and y’s into an equation, and they get a case of brain-freeze that can otherwise be produced only by gulping a Slurpee.

After researching Fat Head, I’m convinced most reporters are prone to Slurpee Syndrome. When they report on this-or-that new study, they don’t want to strain their brains by poring over the actual data. So they just read the abstract and the author’s conclusion, then write the story. That’s how a lot of bad science becomes embedded in our consciousness.

There are notable exceptions, of course. Gary Taubes thoroughly analyzes the hard data – but Gary has a degree in physics from Harvard. That’s why I found it laughable when some media-darling doctors claimed his hypotheses about adaptive thermogenesis and homeostasis would violate the laws of thermodynamics. Yeah, right … the guy with the degree in physics forgot all about the laws of thermodynamics. Luckily for us, there were actual doctors on hand to set the record straight.

To restate Doc’s warning – with a little Mark Twain stirred in – if you can’t do the math, researchers with an agenda will use lies, damned lies and statistics to bamboozle you. Let’s look at how they do it.

Just flat-out lie about the results. Thirty years after the start of the famous Framingham study, the authors of a new report stated that “The most important overall finding is the emergence of the total cholesterol concentration as a risk factor for coronary heart disease in the elderly.” In plain English: high cholesterol kills old people.

Just one little problem: the hard data showed no correlation at all between heart disease and cholesterol in the elderly, as Dr. Uffe Ravnskov pointed out in his excellent book “The Cholesterol Myths.” If you look at the actual data points, they’re all over the place.

Perhaps hoping to clarify the issue, the American Heart Association put actual numbers on the claim: “The results of the Framingham study indicate that a 1% reduction of cholesterol corresponds to a 2% reduction in CHD risk.” But when Dr. Ravnskov crunched the data, he found that the Framingham subjects whose cholesterol decreased over time actually had a higher rate of heart disease, not a lower one.

With this apparent inability to recognize if numbers are going up or down, I respectfully suggest that the Framingham researchers resign their positions and go work for a congressional budget committee. (I also respectfully suggest that reporters who couldn’t be bothered with examining the data start covering school-board meetings.)

Scare people with percentages. When you see a percentage, you’re looking at the results of multiplication or division. But when you see the word “difference,” you are – if the researcher is honest – looking at simple subtraction. If a value goes from 20 to 22, it’s an increase of 10%, but the difference is 2. (Still with me? Good; you have a functioning brain.)

Multiplication and division can produce big, impressive-sounding percentages that are in fact nearly meaningless. Here’s an example that helped enshrine the “cholesterol kills” theory:

After a major study with the acronym MRFIT was concluded, the researchers announced that people with high cholesterol were over 400% more likely to die of heart disease. Ohmigosh!! Get me into an Ornish program, now! I must reduce my cholesterol!

That’s a big, scary number. Let’s see how they came up with it.

Over the course of the study, 0.3% of the men whose cholesterol was below 170 died from heart disease. Meanwhile, 1.3% of the men whose cholesterol was over 265 died of heart disease. Over 265?! Dead man walking! Buy your casket now and save!

And in fact, since 1.3/0.3 = 4.33, you could say the relative risk is 400%.

Now flip the numbers and look at the actual difference. In the low cholesterol group, 99.7% did not die from a heart attack. Among the very high cholesterol group, 98.7% did not die from a heart attack. That’s a difference of 1.0%. In other words, if you go up the scale from low cholesterol to very high cholesterol (nearly 100 points higher), the real difference is that an extra 1 in 100 men died of heart disease. Not quite such a scary number, is it?

Wow people with percentages. Percentages work in the other direction, too. You’ve probably seen the Lipitor ads where Pfizer announces that this wonder drug reduces heart attacks by 36%. That sure sounds impressive … until you look at the actual difference.

In the study cited by Pfizer, men with known risk factors for heart disease took either Lipitor or a placebo. In the placebo group, barely more than 3% had a heart attack. In the Lipitor group, 2% had a heart attack. Use division, and you get that impressive 36% reduction. But the difference, once again, is 1 in 100, or 1%. Boy, that’s worth giving your liver a major smack-down.

And by the way, the difference in the heart-attack rate for women who take statins and women who don’t is: zero. You can multiply that difference, divide it, square it, triangle it, stick it inside a trapezoid, whatever … you still can’t come up with a reason for women to take statins – ever.

Count only the numbers you like. (Otherwise known as “cherry picking” your data.) In trials conducted on statins, researchers will happily announce that fewer people died of heart disease. (Not a whole lot fewer … see above.) But they’re curiously silent about how many people died overall. In fact, they refuse to release what’s called the “all-cause mortality” data. Gee, I wonder why?

If I conduct a five-year study in which I give one group a daily glass of orange juice, and another group a daily glass of rat poison, I can guarantee you that far fewer people in the rat-poison group will die from heart disease. But I doubt the all-cause mortality numbers would help sell rat poison as a new wonder drug.

(And in fact, studies of the first cholesterol-lowering drugs were stopped because too many subject were dying of cancer … but at least they didn’t get heart disease.)

Here’s another example of cherry-picking data: Awhile back, newspaper headlines were practically screaming that smoking cigars is nearly as dangerous as smoking cigarettes – you know, high rates of cancer and all that. The American Cancer Society jumped all over the report. And since I enjoy two or three cigars per week while taking my five-mile walks, this one grabbed my interest.

As it turns out, the researchers compiled their data from men who smoke five or more cigars per day. Now, a good cigar can easily take an hour to smoke. So unless these guys were standing outside half the day, they were lighting up indoors and inhaling a lot of smoke. And I’m pretty sure anyone who smokes five cigars a day isn’t exactly a health nut. Lord only knows what else these guys put into their bodies.

Most cigars smokers don’t even average one per day. When other researchers compared men who smoke one cigar per day with nonsmokers, the difference in cancer rates was insignificant. (The cigar smokers were also more likely to have Austrian accents and be elected governor of California.)

Confound it! In a real, true, worthwhile study, you compare large groups of people who are statistically identical except for one variable: one group is taking a drug, or adding fiber to their diets, or meditating while listening to Yanni music. Everything else should be the same.

If everything else isn’t the same, you’ve got confounding variables, which means your study data is worthless. You can’t just compare x. You’ve got to compare x while making sure that a, b, c, y and z are virtually identical.

Dean Ornish claims a lowfat diet prevents heart disease. Why? Because he put people on his diet, and by gosh, they had fewer heart attacks than the control group. But Ornish also had the study group stop smoking, start exercising, and take classes in stress management. That’s pretty convenient, considering that smoking and stress are two of the biggest causes of heart disease.

Call me crazy, but I’m pretty sure if I took a group of smoking, stressed-out couch potatoes and had them stop smoking, start exercising, meditate while listening to Yanni, and take up chewing tobacco, their rate of heart disease would plummet. Then I could claim that chewing tobacco prevents heart disease. Heck, I’d probably get a lifetime pass to NASCAR races.

So the next time you see a newspaper headline announcing that some new study “proves” this or that will kill you – or save you – ask yourself a few questions: What exactly did they count? What didn’t they count? Are we looking at a percentage change, and if so, how did they calculate it? What’s the real difference? Did they control their variables? And – most importantly – do the raw numbers actually support the conclusion?

And Doc, if you’re still alive, I want you to know you were one of the best teachers I ever had, at any level. You told me once I was good at math and should look into programming computers for a living, which I thought was a silly idea at the time. Now it’s how I pay the mortgage. It’s also how I paid for Fat Head.

You were even more brilliant than I thought.

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Can Your Own Bologna Kill You?

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I feel like such a pig.

I already knew that humans and pigs share a lot of the same DNA.  (Some would argue this is more true for men than women.)  But it only occurred to me recently that we might also store the same kind of fat in our bodies.

The thought was sparked by some literature my wife brought home from a town fair.  A registered dietician had her own booth, and she was passing out pamphlets that warned – surprise! – against consuming too much “artery-clogging saturated fat.”

Yada, yada, yada … same old bologna about how saturated fat drives up your cholesterol, the cholesterol sticks to the inside of your arteries, and then someday you clutch your chest and realize you should’ve tried hang-gliding when you had the chance.  I’ve heard it thousand times, and I’ve known for at least two years that it simply isn’t true, so my reaction was, “Okay, whatever.”

Then I checked another pamphlet, which explained how we should all eat less and exercise more to lose weight.  Yada, yada, yada.  But then my usual “Okay, whatever” screeched to halt at about “whatev—.”

Looking at both pamphlets, I started thinking about the twin pillars of The Holy Church of Accepted Advice For Living A Long and Healthy Life:  Don’t consume animal fat, because it’ll kill you.  And you should eat less to lose weight – which means consuming your own body fat.

Uh, wait a second … that sounds a teeny bit inconsistent.  Are we talking about two totally different kinds of fat here?  Or is it more likely that the fat in fat-back bacon is similar to the fat in Fat-Back Francis Bacon?  So I looked them up.

It’s easy to find the breakdown of lard on the internet.   It’s mostly oleic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid, with several others making up the balance.  Add them up, and it turns out that lard is about 38 percent saturated, 11 percent polyunsaturated, and 45 percent monosaturated.   (The numbers don’t add up to 100 because some of the trace fats were unclassified.)

So most of the fat in lard isn’t even saturated, and nearly half of it is monosaturated, like olive oil.  Pretty interesting, considering that in The Holy Church of Accepted Advice For Living A Long and Healthy Life, monosaturates are worshipped as The Great Protector Of Arteries and Valves.  And while stearic acid is saturated, it’s been shown to raise HDL.  That hardly sounds like a killer fat.

For some reason, finding an analysis of human body fat was trickier.  (I suppose it’s because few of us care about the smoke point or other cooking properties.)  I finally found a paper in which the researchers stated that they extracted human body fat from the subjects’ buttocks.   Since research subjects are often college sophomores, I’m guessing this took place at a fraternity initiation.

In any case, I saw pretty much the same list of fatty acids.  Add them up, and it turns out that human body fat is about 35 percent saturated, 51 percent monosaturated, and the rest polyunsaturated.  In other words, it’s similar to lard.

The implications are interesting.  For one, if you were fat growing up, this means the skinny snot-nosed kid who used to call you a “lard butt” might not have been such a bad kid after all.  He may have just  been studying biochemistry – secretly, of course, because if the classroom bullies found out, they would make alterations to his biochemistry during recess.

For another, if the anti-fat hysterics are correct, then we know why cannibals are mostly extinct:  they died of atherosclerosis.  I’ve already started writing the docu-drama:

EXT. The Cannibals’ Camp – Day

The cannibals are tying Livingston to a pole.  He remains calm, chin up, even as other cannibals begin lighting the kindling around his feet.

Livingston
Go ahead, you savages!  Wait until my beer
belly collides with your coronary arteries.  Ha!

EXT. The Cannibals’ Camp – Night

A feast is in full swing.  A grinning CANNIBAL takes a hearty bite from a roasted leg.  Then, wide-eyed, he clutches his chest and falls to the ground.  From inside his chest, we hear LIVINGSTON LAUGH.

The other cannibals drop the bones they’ve been chewing and begin fighting over the pile of untouched vegetables.

FADE OUT

So let’s do a little math.  If you consume 2500 calories per day and half of them come from fat, that’s 1250 calories – pretty close to my daily fat intake, in fact.

Now, suppose you’re overweight and burn about 2500 calories per day.   The High Priests of The Holy Church of Accepted Advice For Living A Long and Healthy Life (otherwise known as dieticians) would happily put you on a diet in the 1200-calorie range, with very little fat.  Why?  So you’ll burn your own body fat to make up the difference and lose weight.

This is considered healthy.  But it means you’d be getting 1300 of your daily calories from fat.  Even if your diet consisted of nothing but Weight Watchers “Smart Ones” meals (just 1 gram of fat per serving!), more than 52 percent of your fuel would come from fat.  And not just fat:  human body fat, which is nearly as saturated as lard.

So, much as I did when I was in catechism classes, I have an annoying question to ask:  when this porky fat streams out of your adipose tissue and invades your unsuspecting muscles and organs to be burned for fuel, why isn’t your health at risk?  Why don’t your arteries clog up?

Maybe you’d be better off leaving all that “artery-clogging saturated fat” safely imprisoned in your buttocks.  After all, it’s an unrepentant killer.

Or perhaps there’s something about body-fat the High Priests haven’t told us.   Perhaps our own fat knows a secret password it can use to identify itself so the body doesn’t try to commit suicide – which is, of course, what it does when saturated fat mounts an invasion via the digestive system.

“Red alert!  Red Alert!  Fat globules attempting flanking maneuver!”

“Roger!  Liver, crank out the artery-clogging LDL!  Small particles, full charge, dead ahead!  Stop the heart!  Stop the heart!  They’ll never take us alive!”

“Wait, sir!  The fat globules are signaling!  I’ll issue the challenge.  Flash!”

“Thunder!”

“Abort!  Abort!  They’re ours! Proceed back to full health; I repeat, proceed to full health!”

Then, of course, the muscles and organs would welcome the fat globules, who would regale them with stories about life trapped in a prisoner-of-war buttocks, and express their gratitude to have finally escaped.  Then they’d be ceremonially eaten.

Maybe I’m missing something here, but I don’t see the difference.  If you go on the Atkins or Protein Power diet and get most of your calories from fat, why is that more dangerous that consuming your own body fat on a calorie-restricted diet?

According to the theories espoused by the High Priests, Mother Nature screwed up, big time.  She designed our bodies to store our fuel reserves as a fat that could kill us when we actually need it.  But I don’t think Mother Nature is that stupid.  After all, she was smart enough to make pigs.  She was also smart enough to make fat-back bacon delicious.

But for the record, I have no opinion on Fat-Back Francis Bacon.

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Parents, Don’t Listen To This Bologna

A couple of days ago, I was thumbing through the April issue of Parents Magazine and came across an article titled “Super-Healthy, Super-Easy Snacks.”  The article explains that since kids have tiny tummies, they fill up easily at meal times and actually need snacks in-between to keep their energy up. 

Fair enough.  But then the article goes on to offer a “super snack planner” that will make it easy to “stack the chips in favor of your kid’s health.”

Chips?  Did they mention chips?  Of course they did – because tortilla chips are one of those “super-healthy” snacks … and “super-easy” too:   just lightly coat two whole-grain tortillas with vegetable-oil spray (yee-uck!), bake them for 10 minutes, cut them into wedges, and use them to scoop up some pineapple chunks.   The entire snack is only 112 calories and – best of all – only 2 grams of fat! 

Well, heck, with so little fat, it must be “super-healthy.”

Before I go on, let me answer the question I know you probably want to ask, especially if you’re a female:  “You’re a man, and you actually read Parents magazine?”

Yes, of course I do.  I’m like any other dedicated father —  if I’m already sitting down in the bathroom, I’ll read whatever is within arm’s reach.  I’m reasonably sure my wife arranges the magazines with exactly this purpose in mind.  When my girls were toddlers, I could offer informed opinions about the hottest must-have toys in the Fisher-Price catalog (which I affectionately referred to as the “For Sure Overpriced catalog).

I know the editors mean well, but this article is just another load of the same old bologna:  Carbohydrates are wonderful, and fat is bad.  If you want to be a good mommy, you must be vigilant in protecting your progeny from the evils of dietary fat. 

Here are few more examples of the “super snack planner” ideas:

Biscotti Gone Bananas:  basically, a banana-bread mix shaped into biscotti and baked.  Just 101 calories and 3 grams of fat.

Breadstick Snails:  breadstick mix, curled up to look like a snail, mixed with pesto sauce.  Just 96 calories and 3 grams of fat.

Peach Crisp:  canned peaches in light syrup (uh, that would be sugar), topped with cinnamon, low-fat granola, and low-fat yogurt.  Just 101 calories and 1 gram of fat.

Only 1 gram of fat?  Well, that’s a relief; it makes the math easy. 

The 1 gram of fat provides 9 calories.  We’re looking at perhaps 2 or 3 grams of protein, at 4 calories per gram.  Split the difference, and you get 10 calories.  That means this “super-healthy” 101-calorie snack provides 82 calories from carbohydrates.  

Congratulations …  thanks to the nutrition experts at Parents magazine, you just served Little Johnny the equivalent of nearly two tablespoons of sugar – more than six times the amount of sugar in his bloodstream.  To avoid going into sugar-shock, Little Johnny’s pancreas will have to crank out some insulin to smack his blood sugar down.

I think I’ll send the editors of Parents magazine an article titled “Feed Your Kids Sugar!” 

It’s 3:30 in the afternoon, and dinner is still nearly two hours away.  Little Johnny’s tummy is rumbly, but you’re already swamped with making dinner and helping Johnny’s big sister Sally with her homework.  So what’s a busy mom to do? 

Here’s a simple but effective trick:  go to the sugar bowl, and scoop two tablespoons of those delicious white granules into a plastic serving cup.  Then hand the cup to Johnny, along with his favorite Spider-Man spoon, and voila! – Johnny is happy, and so are you, because you can return your attention to Sally’s homework. 

Kids love sugar, and best of all it’s fat-free!  After all, you don’t want Johnny’s brain – which is growing at a rapid rate and is made almost entirely of fat – to overdevelop.  Next thing you know, those ADD symptoms will mysteriously vanish and he’ll be pestering you with annoying questions, such as “Why does eating corn make cows so fat?” or “Have you and Dad started a college fund yet?”

But I’m pretty sure the editors would reject my article.  I might even find some helpful people from Child and Family Services standing on my porch the next time the doorbell rings.  They’d order me to take a state-approved parenting class, where I’d learn that sugar is only a “super-healthy snack” if it’s dressed up as a breadstick.

To be fair, the authors did suggest a few higher-fat snacks, such fruit-and-cheese kabobs, or fruit dipped in dark chocolate.  But most of the “super-easy snacks” are based on bread, crackers, waffles, or granola … otherwise known as starch, starch, and more starch, with a little sugar thrown in.

The irony here is that the same issue features advertisements for ADD drugs, plus an article on how to deal with temper-tantrums.

Well, that’s just great:  in one article, you can learn how to prepare Little Johnny a snack that will take his blood sugar on a roller-coaster ride.  Then, while Johnny is busy bouncing off the walls, you can flip to another article and prepare yourself for the meltdown.  If you’re a fast reader, you might even finish the article before Johnny’s blood sugar crashes.  Then you can confidently attempt to use psychology to handle a problem that is almost purely biochemical.

I’m no psychologist, but I did take a couple of classes in college, so here are some verbal techniques I’d suggest, depending on your parenting style:

“Johnny, it doesn’t make Mommy and Daddy proud of you when your blood sugar crashes.  You want us to be proud of you, don’t you?  If you stop crashing right now, I’ll put a gold star on your chart.”

“Johnny, stop that crashing this instant!  If you don’t stop crashing, you won’t get a big, sugary dessert after supper!”

“You want something to crash about?!  I’ll give you something to crash about!  Now stop crashing!”

But I don’t expect kids to stop crashing anytime soon.  For the past 30-some years, the nutrition experts have managed to scare parents into cutting the animal fat from their kids’ diets and serving them more juices, more starchy vegetables, and more grains.  Do-gooders like the Center for Science in the Public Interest harassed schools into serving skim milk instead of whole milk.   The American Heart Association seal of approval is proudly displayed on boxes of Cocoa Puffs – a low-fat, whole-grain food!  (Just be sure to pour skim milk on that big bowl of carbohydrates … you wouldn’t want a glob of fat to slow down the sugar buzz.)

The result of the anti-fat campaign has been skyrocketing rates of juvenile diabetes and attention-deficit disorders, not to mention a lot more kids wearing what we used to call “huskies.” Naturally, after witnessing the sorry outcome of their efforts, the experts reached the obvious conclusion:  we should continue doing exactly what they’ve been telling us to do, only more of it.

I am, of course, accustomed to seeing dietary bologna promoted in the popular media.  But it was a bit jarring to realize I actually give subscription dollars to a magazine that’s helping to spread the anti-fat hysteria and advising parents to feed their kids sugar and starch.

I’m just glad I was sitting down.

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Jimmy Moore’s Blogiversary, Part Two

Yesterday, I posted part one of my interview with Jimmy Moore, whose blog Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb is one of the most useful health and nutrition web sites in all of cyberspace.  In that post, Jimmy recounted his journey from living life as a morbidly obese man who weighed more 400 pounds to being the healthy, energetic guy he is today.

Jimmy Moore before the low-carb diet.

Jimmy Moore before the low-carb diet.

In today’s post, Jimmy answers questions about what it’s like to be a pro blogger.  I was especially interested in this topic because when I started kicking around the idea of turning the Fat Head site into a blog, I mentioned it to exactly two bloggers whose work I admire, Jimmy Moore and Dr. Mike Eades.  They both gave the same basic advice:  do it!

Jimmy after the low-carb diet ... with a reminder of before.

Jimmy after the low-carb diet … with a reminder of before.

To anyone who reads your blog, it’s obvious that you’re not just a guy who lost weight; you’re educated.  You know more about nutrition and weight loss than most doctors, in my opinion.  You’ve absolutely shredded some badly-designed studies in your posts.  How did you learn what you know now?

It’s funny, Tom, my background is in English and government.  When I went to college, I thought I wanted to be a lawyer or lobbyist on Capitol Hill.  I even got a Master’s Degree in Public Policy, which taught me a lot about researching issues and getting all the angles of a story before forming an opinion.  Writing is a deep passion of mine that I have always enjoyed doing.  And sometimes that means coming up with some controversial positions that are backed by the evidence.

Some have openly questioned how a layperson like me can cast doubt and throw stones at a researcher and his study when he is the one with the medical or educational background.  My response to this is simple:  If I can see through shoddy research as someone who isn’t trained in the field of nutrition, then why can’t people who do have the training figure this out?  It’s as if many in the health field have blinders on so they can’t see the forest for the trees anymore.

Of course, it’s not the fault of your doctor that he can’t help you very much with weight loss, because he probably only got one, maybe two weeks of nutritional training in medical school.  That’s astounding to me, considering most of the weight and preventable health problems physicians face today are directly related to the composition of the patient’s diet.  The sooner we admit this obvious fact and begin training people in the medical field better about healthy nutrition (and I don’t mean low-fat!), the quicker we’ll be able to turn this rising tide of obesity and diabetes in the other direction.

I asked you once how you manage to keep up with your blog and hold down a job, and you told me that the blog is your job now.  What kind of work did you do before?

When I started the “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” blog in April 2005, I worked full-time in customer service for a major restaurant corporate office.  The year I lost my weight, I had a highly stressful job in that same company in their risk-management department as a general liabilities coordinator.  I heard so many horror stories about what people allegedly found in food and strange happenings inside the restaurant on a daily basis that I’m surprised I lost a single pound from all the cortisol that was being released in me in 2004.

Thankfully, I was able to leave that department and go back to the friendly confines of customer service again.  Most of my career has been customer service-type jobs in restaurants, retail, and even a stint as the music buyer for a chain of Christian bookstores in Virginia.  I’ve had an eclectic experience in my work life and I believe all of it trained me to do what I’m doing now.

So how did you become a professional blogger?  Did you know it would turn into a career, or was that just the happy result of a passionately pursuing a hobby?

Well, it was kinda by accident.  The economy was already hitting companies hard even before this current recession and I was a part of the downsizing at the big corporation I was working for in October 2006.  My blog had built up a sizable amount of traffic at that point and I had negotiated a few sponsorships to make it a little profitable.  So when it came time to figure out what to do next in my career, I remember telling Christine, “I think I’m going to try to start blogging full-time.”

The look on her face was priceless, and we preceded to have a series of discussions about it.  She thought I needed a “real” job; the idea of not knowing if money would be coming in month-to-month freaked her out.  I told her that people with sales jobs live like that all the time, and it’s feast or famine.  But I assured her I would work my tail off and make it work for several reasons:  1) I needed to feel like the work I do has meaning and a purpose beyond a paycheck; 2) I wanted to be available to her during the day since she has some physical and emotional problems that warrant my presence; and 3) The blog had become much bigger than I ever imagined it would be, so the time was right.

Here we are nearly three years later, and I’m still doing this full-time.  And with all I do these days, I need every minute of every hour of every day just to squeeze it all in.  I’m working longer and harder at this job than at any other job I’ve ever had.  To be honest, I probably could charge good money for much of the content that I provide.  But that’s not gonna happen.  What I was given through my low-carb weight loss journey is worth much more than all the money in the world.  I got my life back, and now I’m paying it forward to as many people as I can find to tell them the positive message of livin’ la vida low-carb.

When did the podcasting idea occur to you? How did you get it going?

Actually, it wasn’t my idea.  In the Fall 2006, a blogging friend of mine named Kevin Kennedy-Spaien was putting together a new health podcast show called “The Health Hacks Podcast.”  It would feature a variety of voices with 5-minute segments talking about a specific topic related to health. Because of my outspokenness at my blog, Kevin thought I would be perfect for the show.  Since I had some experience doing Christian radio back in the 1990s hosting a weekly countdown show, it was nice to be back behind the microphone again.

Within one month of being a part of “Health Hacks,” Kevin approached me again and asked if I wanted to host my own podcast show because my segments were dominating the format.  The enthusiasm I had along with my broad layman’s knowledge of the subject matter impressed the powers-that-be so much that they gave me the green light to begin recording my own stand-alone show.  Thus was born in October 2006 my new podcast — “The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show with Jimmy Moore.”

The quality of the audio in those early days was a little rough, so we kept tweaking it until it was as perfect as it could be.  And I used many of my previous blog posts to come up with content to talk about for the show.  Around mid-2007, I got the idea while attending an obesity conference to conduct interviews with the recording software on my computer.  While I’d never done an interview format before, it felt normal almost immediately.  Of course, it’s gotten even more comfortable the more I’ve done it in the years since.

Did it feel strange, getting in touch with top-notch researchers and asking them to appear on your show?  Were they generally nice, not so nice, or … ?

You know, I didn’t even think about how awkward it might be to contact some of these big boys asking for an interview.  And, actually, my very first interview guest was none other than low-fat diet guru Dr. Dean Ornish.  I had been pursuing an interview with him for my blog during the summer of 2006 and we kept exchanging e-mails back and forth until we finally made it happen via telephone in October 2007.  I recorded it so I could later transcribe the interview at my blog, but I did eventually release that rough audio on my podcast about a year later.

The contacts I had made at these Nutrition & Metabolism, American Society of Bariatric Physicians, and other such conferences were absolute gold.  Once I interviewed someone, then they would put in a good word with their colleagues about coming on my show next.  After a while, some guests would contact me first asking if I would like an interview.  But I do put in a lot of time and effort finding a wide variety of guests, including scientists, doctors, weight loss successes, researchers, and even people who disagree with the low-carb point of view.  Most are generally very nice and professional towards me because that’s the way I treat them.

In the three-year history of the podcast, only two people have turned down my request for an interview:  Dr. Joel Fuhrman, a pro-vegetarian author of a book called Eat to Live, and Dr. Al Sears, famous low-carb expert featured in your documentary film.  I wanted Dr. Fuhrman to appear on my show to ask him about why he has participated in bashing Dr. Atkins so much and to question his opposition to saturated fat.  His gatekeeper said Dr. Furhman wouldn’t be coming on my show because I’m “just a lowly blogger.”  As for Dr. Sears, he’s just an amazing wealth of information that would be a real treat for my devoted listeners. Maybe someday they’ll come around.

Any special upcoming guests you’d like announce ahead of time?

Hmmmm, let’s see. I’ve got Dr. Loren Cordain from The Paleo Diet coming up in late April, Dr. Brian Wansink, who wrote Mindless Eating, Sally Fallon from The Weston A. Price Foundation, Dr. Malcolm Kendrick of The Great Cholesterol Con fame, and Nina Planck, who has a new book on getting kids to eat real food.

I try to stay several months ahead of schedule with my podcasts so I can take a break every now and then from recording.  I took most of the last two months off to write on my next book set to be released within a couple of months called STILL Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb: 21 Indelible Lessons From The First Five Years Of My Low-Carb Journey.  I’m still writing on it, but most of it is done now. I’m booked just about every single day in the month of April and early May to cover my twice-weekly podcast through summertime.

How do you prepare for the podcast interviews?  I’ve listened to them all for at least the past year, and I have yet to hear you run out questions.

Currently, “The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show with Jimmy Moore” is ranked among the most-listened-to “Nutrition & Fitness” podcasts on iTunes, up there with Oprah’s Health podcast and others.  I’m honored that so many people find my show appealing and I purposely format it to be more conversational in nature so it sounds like two friends are talking and everyone gets to eavesdrop in while they’re chatting.  It’s so much better to listen to than a boring, robotic pre-set question and answer format.  My head is constantly thinking of questions based on the answers I hear from the guests and I think that benefits the listeners more because I’m just a real guy asking questions that might be on my readers’ minds. I try to put myself in the shoes of the listeners and respond accordingly.

Have any particular podcasts generated an unusually positive or negative response from your audience?

Uh, yeah, you could say that. Back in 2007 I interviewed a lady known as “Kimmer,” who is the owner of a diet web site that shall remain unnamed.  It was an exclusive 90-minute interview featuring this woman who claimed to lose 200 pounds on her own homemade low-carb diet.  Hundreds upon hundreds of responses poured in, both pro and con, about her story — which we later found out to be made up by a 300-pounder from Corona, California after a private investigator exposed her scam with video proof.  Let’s just say when you screw with people, your day is coming and she’s now facing a very serious class-action lawsuit for the harm she caused people putting them on a low-fat, low-carb starvation diet of less than 500 calories a day.  This should serve as a solemn reminder that not everyone who lurks around the World Wide Web is as squeaky clean as you think!

What’s a typical workday for Jimmy Moore like?

Work?  What’s that?  Actually, as I previously stated, I work longer and harder now than I’ve ever worked in my entire life.  The only difference is I get to do something I genuinely love.  From the time I wake up until I go to bed, it’s pretty much doing something with the “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” brand.  From researching new studies and low-carb news, contacting potential podcast guests, recording the interviews for my podcast, shooting and editing YouTube videos, writing on my new book, calling potential sponsors, checking my hundreds of daily e-mails, and, of course, blogging, it’s all quite overwhelming at times.

But I stay grounded in knowing that everything I do is making an impact on the life of someone else around the world.  That’s what I keep reminding myself of whenever I feel an inkling that it isn’t worth doing anymore.  As long as people need to hear the truth, I’m gonna keep giving it to them!

Do you ever wake up the morning and feel stumped for ideas? Do you ever turn to Christine and say, “I can’t think of anything to write about today!”

You know, I thought there would be a day I’d wake up and wonder what the heck I could write about — especially after four years of doing this.  But, in all honesty, I’ve NEVER had that problem.  Chalk it up to my dedication to research and some truly benevolent readers who send me stuff, I’m always loaded for bear every single day with stuff to write about.  My problem is I have to chunk some good stuff or throw it all in together in one big news update post at times to catch up.  That’s a nice problem to have, huh?

Does Christine help out with the Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb site?

Christine’s role is to help keep track of the financial end of Less of Moore, More or Less, LLC.  She’s a voracious record-keeper and I’m happy to give her that role since I loathe it.  You could say I’m the creative guy and she’s the organized one.  Together we make a perfect couple and I couldn’t do what I do without her love and support.

I know many people have been inspired by your story.  How often do you hear from them? What do they tell you?

Everyday I receive e-mails that simply say “thank you” in their own unique way.  People talk about their low-carb journey, how they came across my blog, podcast or YouTube videos, how their weight and health has improved so dramatically, what their life was like before, and how they have such hope for the future now.  Tom, you can’t put a price on the power of changed lives like this.  It’s invigorating for me to know that I’m making such a difference in the lives of other people who are facing the same challenges that I did in 2004 during my weight loss.  And these e-mails seem to come at the perfect time some days when I need a little pick-me-up to get me revved up again about livin’ la vida low-carb.

Do you ever hear from people who insist that low-carb diets are all hogwash?  Do you get emails that say something like, “Hi, Jimmy. You’re a nut.”  How do you respond to those?

Sad to say, but yes, this also comes with the territory.  I’m even dedicating an entire chapter of my new book to these people called “When you put yourself out there, people will hate you.”  Hiding behind a computer screen and sharing whatever is on your mind with a perfect stranger who happens to blogger seems to be the latest American pastime.  Sometimes I find it rather humorous and blog about the crazy things people say to me just so my readers realize what I have to put up with sometimes.  But you take the good with the bad and hopefully in the end it all evens out, even though it may not feel that way sometimes.

What’s the best part of your job? And what, if anything, is the worst part?

The worst part: not being able to blog as much as I’d like to because of all the things that I do.  But that’s really not so bad since I’m able to expand the reach of my message.  And having people doubt your sincerity and integrity about what you are doing.  I make all my blogs, podcasts, and YouTube videos available for FREE to anyone who wants access to them, and yet some people complain that I’m a shyster only in this for the money.  That has never made sense to me because I live my life as an open book with all the honesty I can possibly muster up.

The best part:  getting to help people radically transform their lives for the better while supporting my family doing something I adore.  Plus, getting to interview cool guests like Tom Naughton is pretty sensational, too!

Thanks, Jimmy, for spending some time with me.  Now get back to that blog.

Yessir!

As I mentioned yesterday, Jimmy is sponsoring a “blogiversary” contest for his readers. He’ll be giving away over 100 prizes, including autographed copies of books by authors such as Gary Taubes, Dr. Jeff Volek, Dr. Keith Berkowitz, Judy Barnes Baker, Dr. Loren Cordain, Nina Planck, Fred Hahn, Jackie Eberstein, and many more. He will also be giving away five autographed DVD copies of “Fat Head.”

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Jimmy Moore’s Blogiversary, Part One

For this post, I’m going to set aside my usual smart-aleck persona in order to introduce you to someone whose work I admire and whose web site is, in my opinion, a public service:  Jimmy Moore.

If you don’t already know about Jimmy and his Livin’ La Vida Low Carb blog, you should.  Jimmy is a prolific writer who manages to put up new and interesting posts on diet and health topics on an almost daily basis, as well as releasing bi-weekly podcast interviews with some of the top researchers and writers in the nutrition field.  I’m talking about people like Gary Taubes, Drs. Mike and Mary Dan Eades, Dr. Richard Feinman and Dr. Jeff Volek, to name just a few.  No wonder his podcast is one of the highest-ranked health shows on iTunes.

And as if that weren’t enough, he also produces a Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb show that he uploads to YouTube.  In short, he’s a machine.

Jimmy Moore at over 400 pounds

Jimmy Moore at over 400 pounds

I download Jimmy’s podcasts and listen to them while I’m walking or driving. I can’t tell you how much I’ve learned from them.  My only regret is that I didn’t discover Jimmy’s site until I was pretty much finished shooting Fat Head, or I would’ve asked some of the people he’s interviewed to appear in the film.  Maybe I would’ve flown to South Carolina to get Jimmy on camera as well.

Jimmy’s blog is about to celebrate its fourth anniversary.  Think about how much work that is:  four years of almost-daily writing, bi-weekly podcasting, and video production.  Now think about all the people who’ve benefitted. Just recently, the composer for Fat Head emailed me that a Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb podcast show helped him realize he was suffering from vitamin D deficiency.  He added some vitamin D to his daily supplements, and now the aches and pains that were bothering him so much are gone.

Jimmy Moore, nearly 200 pounds lighter, with wife Christine.

Jimmy Moore, nearly 200 pounds lighter, with wife Christine.

I’m not going to write about Jimmy’s amazing journey from being a morbidly obese man to a happy, healthy blogger who has inspired so many others to follow his lead, because I’d rather you hear it from Jimmy himself.  I asked a lot of questions for the interview, so I’m going to post it in two parts.  Today, most of the questions are about Jimmy’s battles trying to lose weight — and how he finally succeeded.  Tomorrow, we’ll focus more on career as a top blogger.

Just over five years ago, you weighed more than 400 pounds.  What was your quality of life back in those days?  How did you feel in your day-to-day activities?

Thanks, Tom!  Those are questions I’ve been asked about often since my Atkins low-carb weight loss success in 2004, and I shudder when I think about what my life was like before I started livin’ la vida low-carb.  Quality of life?  Survival.  And it was LITERALLY trying to make it from day to day without ripping another pair of overpriced Big & Tall store pants, wheezing from breathing problems, worrying about my high cholesterol and high blood pressure making me keel over with a heart attack any day now, feeling like everybody was staring at me because I’m “the fat guy,” and genuinely wondering why I ever got to be in this situation that seemed to be so permanent.

I’m sure many people who are or have been morbidly obese in their lifetime can relate to the helpless, hopeless feeling of being trapped inside of your own body with no way out.   It was miserable — although I always tried to keep a happy face to conceal the deep-seated pain I was feeling.

I don’t know any fat people who haven’t tried to lose weight, and I’m sure you did too.  What kind of diets did you try, and what kind of results did you get?

Do you have all day, Tom?  You name it and I’ve pretty much done it.  Rabbit food, 1000-calorie, Weight Down, TOPS, yadda yadda yadda, the list goes on.  However, Slim-Fast was one of the diets I did most often because I could — sorry to be so graphic — poop my fat away.  But in addition to all that fiber they put in it, there was also a boatload of sugar in it, too.

Of course, I didn’t mind eating sugar because it was “fat-free” after all.  And growing up in our fat-phobic society, I just naturally gravitated to any diet that would cut the fat as low as possible.  In 1999, I actually lost 170 pounds in nine months on a very high-carb, very low-fat diet probably on sheer determination. But the weight loss didn’t last very long.

Why didn’t you become an advocate for low-fat diets?  You didn’t start the Livin’ La Vida Low-Fat site.  Why not?

Well, blogs weren’t really in vogue in the late 1990s yet, but I was boasting about my success to everyone I knew.  They all thought I had done the Atkins diet, and I remember responding angrily at these people assuming I ate that unhealthy high-protein diet.  Yes, I was a dope back then and would one day learn the truth about low-carb living for myself.

But I had a secret regarding low-fat living that I didn’t want anyone to know about:  I was so constantly hunger, feeling deprived of the foods I wanted to eat, and actually getting angrier and angrier in my demeanor (my wife Christine often reminds me what a royal you-know-what I was on my low-fat diet) that I couldn’t sustain that way of eating for long.

A fateful trip to McDonald’s just weeks after losing all that weight to get Christine a Big Mac meal that she wanted was the beginning of my rebellion against low-fat eating and I binged my way within four months back up to where I started and then some.  Although I felt bad about gaining back the weight, there was no way in the world I wanted to live like that for the rest of my life!

You started on the Atkins diet in January of 2004.  After gaining and losing and regaining in the past, what made you decide to try yet another diet?

Actually, I have my in-laws to thank for this.  They purchased me a copy of Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution for Christmas 2003.  I remember reading that book cover-to-cover and thinking how bassackwards everything was in it from what I had heard and been taught about healthy living.  The whole time I was reading it, I kept saying to myself, “There’s no way possible you could ever lose weight and make these kind of positive changes in your health by eating all that fat!”

Fat-phobia had been hammered into me hard my entire life!  But even before I started, something told me this time was gonna be different.  Yes, I was beginning a New Year’s resolution on January 1, 2004 to lose weight, but in all actuality this was gonna be a New LIFE resolution that would have to sustain me forever and ever.  That is one of the things that attracted me to low-carb, that it allowed me to enjoy delicious and satisfying meals that kept me from ever being hungry or feeling deprived.  Could I possibly eat this way and lose weight?  Well, the proof was in the results.

How is the experience with a low-carb diet different from your previous attempts at dieting?

Night and day.  In the first few days of Atkins, I had a tough time adjusting to the sugar and carbohydrate withdrawals during the crucial Induction period the first two weeks.  Being a severe sugar addict, I had to basically detox from all that.  People who eat low-fat don’t experience this bodily response, but I imagine it is somewhat similar to what a cocaine addict goes through coming off of the drugs for the first time.

But, unlike low-fat diets that left me feeling so empty the longer I did them, something truly miraculous happened.  Not only did I feel better after a short period of time, I felt like for the first time in my life I had found the hidden key to a door that had never been opened.  I was beginning to see freedom from the bondage that morbid obesity had put me under for three decades of my life and there was a glimmer of hope.  By the end of that first month, I had lost 30 pounds and by the end of February 2004, I lost another 40 pounds.

The weight was pouring off of me so fast that I couldn’t believe what was happening on the scale and in my clothes.  Despite a 10-week stall in the midst of my 180-pound weight loss that year, I stuck with it.  Why wouldn’t I when it was working so amazingly well?  What’s a stall supposed to do to discourage someone who’s already lost 100 pounds?  It was at that point I knew I’d never eat any other way ever again.

What was it about losing weight on the Atkins diet that inspired you to become such an advocate for low-carb diets?

You know, Tom, I think it was the realization that I had been lied to about what constituted a healthy lifestyle.  I grew up as a child of the 1980s and watched my mom go to Weight Watchers, eat rice cakes, use margarine, cut the fat almost completely out of her diet and more, all in pursuit of getting thinner and protecting her health.  And what did it get her?  She’d lose some, gain some, lose some more, gain a lot more — the cycle never ended.

Was it my mom’s fault she couldn’t keep the weight off, or were the nutritional mandates by those so-called health “experts” setting her up for failure even before she started?  The adage was that she just didn’t try hard enough, didn’t exercise enough willpower to control her desires, didn’t get enough exercise on a daily basis, and on and on the excuses go.  This guilt-tripping of Americans who simply are not equipped to succeed on a low-fat diet is what I believe is the primary reason obesity and diabetes are running so rampant these days.

People need to know that there are viable alternatives to low-fat eating that are just as effective, if not more, for weight loss and health improvements.  And no matter what the anti-meat, vegetarian zealots would have you believe, diets like Atkins are absolutely safe and preferred for people dealing with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome — which is most of the population.  Where are people going to get this information if our government, media, and doctors won’t tell them about it?

That’s why the new media in the form of blogs, podcasts, YouTube videos, Facebook, Twitter, and the like are all VITAL to this open communication with the public about what the facts are about healthy living.  By no means do I have all the answers regarding the questions people have about livin’ la vida low-carb.  But what I do have is experience, success, and a Rolodex full of people who are voraciously researching and treating patients with a carbohydrate-restricted diet and changing their lives forever.  In the absence of the late, great Dr. Robert C. Atkins, I am happy to carry on his legacy for future generations.

You’ve been very open and honest about the loss of your brother, Kevin, who died from heart disease at age 41 some months back.  If you hadn’t decided to change your diet permanently, you probably would be on your way to the same fate.  Why wasn’t Kevin inspired by your example?  Did the two of you talk about health issues?

Like many overweight and obese people walking around today, Kevin made choices for himself that were about feeling good at the time.  He actually did try the low-carb lifestyle and lost about 60 pounds or so a couple of years ago following my diet.  But then he started feeling better, coming off some medications, and quit the diet, thinking he was all better now.  And when the predictable weight gain happened, he was right back in the same mess he was in before.

I often asked Kevin how I could help him and even had some of my podcast guest experts offer to fly down to Florida to counsel him — but he just shrugged his shoulders and didn’t take it very seriously.  Of course, he had three heart attacks in the span of a week back in 1999 that the doctors said should have killed him at the age of 32.  So we feel fortunate that he lived nearly a decade longer than he should have.  His death in late 2008 has stirred me to be even more passionate about sharing the low-carb message with as many people as I can.  If we can prevent another “Kevin” out there from falling prey to morbid obesity and heart disease, then all my efforts will have been worth it!

Check back tomorrow to learn how Jimmy became a professional blogger whose site draws hundreds of thousands of readers every month.

A note:  As part of celebrating his four years as a blogger, Jimmy is sponsoring a “blogiversary” contest for his readers. He’ll be giving away over 100 prizes, including autographed copies of books by authors such as Gary Taubes, Dr. Jeff Volek, Dr. Keith Berkowitz, Judy Barnes Baker, Dr. Loren Cordain, Nina Planck, Fred Hahn, Jackie Eberstein, and many more. He will also be giving away five autographed DVD copies of “Fat Head.”

I apologize ahead of time for my lousy penmanship.

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And The Lap Band Played On …

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I saw this billboard while driving to my office a couple of days ago.  I was so stunned, I nearly blew through a stop sign.  I pulled over and snapped a picture with my cell phone, but the resolution wasn’t good, so I went back the next day with a digital camera.

Let’s talk why this sign is a load of bologna.  We’ll start with “Dieting Sucks.”  That kind of depends on the diet, doesn’t it?  For me, low-fat diets certainly sucked.  I’d lose a little weight, stall, and end up feeling lethargic and depressed.  The “Fit For Life” diet also sucked.  After consuming nothing but fruit and juice half the day, I’d get a sugar buzz, then crash, then up feeling shaky from not having any fat or protein in my system.

But my current diet doesn’t suck.  Here’s what I consumed today:

  • Breakfast — Italian sausage with sautéed onions, scrambled eggs, a couple of strawberries, coffee with heavy cream.
  • Lunch —  Big handful of roasted almonds, a tablespoon of coconut oil.  (It was a late breakfast, so I wasn’t that hungry.  The almonds would’ve been plenty, but coconut oil is waaaay yummy.)
  • Dinner — Ribeye steak, Caesar salad without croutons, sautéed vegetables drizzled with butter.
  • Late-Night Snack — A slice of goat’s milk brie cheese, and a mix of almonds, Brazil nuts, and macadamias.  I picked the nuts out of the big jar my wife buys at Costco.  My girls prefer the cashews, so it works out well.  I like the big Costco jar of nuts because it’s inexpensive, and they don’t roast the nuts in any nasty vegetables oils.

It’s late at night as I write, and I feel full and satisfied.  Not once all day did I look at what I was eating and say, “Man, this diet SUCKS!”

Do I wish I could eat Doritos and pizza without getting fat and sick?  Sure.  I used to love that stuff.  However, if you want to be healthy, you can’t eat everything.  You have to make choices.

But you wouldn’t know that from the billboard, would you?  Hey, dieting sucks!  Don’t put yourself through that … get surgery instead!  Just one little problem:  lap-band surgery doesn’t save you from dieting; it just forces you on a diet by shrinking your stomach to a fraction of its natural size.

And what a luxurious diet it is!  Here’s some information I copied and pasted from a web site for people considering lap-band surgery:

The second phase of the Lap-Band diet consists of 5 to 6 weeks of a modified full liquid diet; the key component of this phase is consuming two ounces of a protein shake every hour for ten to twelve hours a day with two ounces of other liquids such as soup, baby food, or sugar-free gelatin three times a day.

During the second six weeks following Lap-Band surgery patients may eat food that is shredded in a food processor prior to eating. The basic foods on the Lap-Band diet include meats or other forms of protein, vegetables, and salads.

After Lap-Band surgery the stomach will never hold more than 4 to 6 ounces per meal, so making every bite count is essential for healthy and nutritionally rounded weight loss success.  Protein is especially important following Lap-Band surgery.  The Lap-Band diet does not include most bread, potatoes and other starchy vegetables.

Hmmm … protein shakes for six weeks, a gut-busting two ounces at a time.  But after that, you can pig out on up to six ounces of protein, salads and vegetables.  Gee, aren’t you glad you didn’t have to go on some awful diet?  (But remember, you need to avoid bread, potatoes and starchy vegetables … almost like someone following one of those crazy low-carb diets.)

Compare the diet of a lap-band victim to the list of what I ate today, then ask yourself a question:  which diet actually SUCKS?  And what can we say about a surgeon who would put up this billboard to encourage people to undergo an expensive and unnecessary procedure?  Let me see, the words are coming to me … oh, I know:  he sucks, too.

p.s. – A friend of mine had gastric bypass surgery a couple of years ago.  After being thin most of her life, she became obese in the span of a single year and started developing diabetes.  In other words, she crossed the threshold of insulin resistance – she wasn’t eating any more than when she was thin.  The surgery was presented to her as case of “do this or die.”  Yes, she lost a lot of weight.  But she can never eat a normal meal again, and she has recurring problems with digestion.  After watching Fat Head and realizing her weight gain and diabetes were almost surely the result of eating too many carbohydrates – something her doctor never suggested – she regrets having the procedure.

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