Here’s How The (ahem) ‘Plant-Based Diet’ Improves Health

A reader thought I might get a kick out of this photo:

Fake tuna fish.  Boy, that sounds awesome … especially if you look up the ingredients:

Pea protein, pea starch, water, olive oil, potato starch, sea salt, seaweed powder, organic agave nectar, organic apple cider vinegar, konjac powder, ginger.

How the heck does this stuff end up tasting like tuna?! I asked myself.  According to the Amazon reviews (which average two out of five stars), it doesn’t.  Here are some quotes:

One of the worst vegan products I’ve ever tried. It looks smells and tastes like cat food. It’s utterly disgusting and even the thought makes me want to vomit.

Dog food. This was seriously the worst product I’ve tried since becoming a vegan. Looks like dog food, smells like dog food, tastes like…I don’t know.

This stuff is awful, so oily and salty, and the smell… Couldn’t even finish my lunch.

Okay, it’s oily, it stinks, and it tastes like something you’d feed a dog or a cat.  But it’s plant-based, so it will save your life!  I know that, because the apostles of the Church of the Holy Plant-Based Diet are always telling us as much.

In fact, while organizing all my blog ideas, study links, study papers, etc., into Microsoft OneNote recently, I came across a Nutrition Update for Physicians that promotes the Holy Plant-Based Diet.  I think it’s a fine example of how the Holy Plant-Based Diet produces miraculous improvements in health, so let’s take a look:

Despite the strong body of evidence favoring plant-based diets, including studies showing a willingness of the general public to embrace them, many physicians are not stressing the importance of plant-based diets as a first-line treatment for chronic illnesses. This could be because of a lack of awareness of these diets or a lack of patient education resources.

Or it could be because the physicians have gotten a whiff of Vegan Toona.

National dietary guidelines for active living and healthful eating are available at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov.

Well, if they’re pushing MyPlate as a guide, we already know what great experts we’re dealing with.

The goal of this article is to review the evidence supporting plant-based diets and to provide a guideline for presenting them to patients.

Here’s how I’d suggest you present plant-based diets to patients: give them a free can of Vegan Toona.

We start with a case study …

A 63-year-old man with a history of hypertension presented to his primary care physician with complaints of fatigue, nausea, and muscle cramps. The result of a random blood glucose test was 524 mg/dL, and HbA1C was 11.1%. Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed. His total cholesterol was 283 mg/dL, blood pressure was 132/66 mmHg, and body mass index (BMI) was 25 kg/m2. He was taking lisinopril, 40 mg daily; hydrochlorothiazide, 50 mg daily; amlodipine, 5 mg daily; and atorvastatin, 20 mg daily.

A glucose reading of 524?!!  Okay, this poor guy was a mess.  He was a type II diabetic with screamingly high blood sugar.  (And for the internet cowboys who insist insulin resistance is caused by getting fat, please note that his BMI was only 25.)

But of course, eating meat doesn’t cause high blood sugar.  So how did switching to the Holy Plant-Based Diet help this guy with his diabetes?  Here’s how:

He was prescribed metformin, 1000 mg twice daily; glipizide, 5 mg daily; and 10 units of neutral protamine Hagedom insulin at bedtime.

The first order of business was insulin and other drugs that lower blood sugar.  Makes sense, given the screamingly high glucose reading. But what about that plant-based diet that was responsible for all the magic?

His physician also prescribed a low-sodium, plant-based diet that excluded all animal products and refined sugars and limited bread, rice, potatoes, and tortillas to a single daily serving. He was advised to consume unlimited non-starchy vegetables, legumes, and beans, in addition to up to 2 ounces of nuts and seeds daily.

Let’s read that one more time with a slight edit and some emphasis added:

His physician also prescribed a low-sodium, plant-based diet that EXCLUDED REFINED SUGARS AND LIMITED BREAD, RICE, POTATOES, AND TORTILLAS TO A SINGLE DAILY SERVING.

Now wait just a @#$%ing second!  You’re presenting a miracle performed by the Holy Plant-Based Diet, and part of the protocol was to limit bread, rice, potatoes and tortillas to one serving per day?  THOSE ARE PLANT FOODS!  If it’s the meat and eggs that were turning this poor old dude into a diabetic, why the flippity flip was he told to cut out sugar and bread?

Back to the article:

Over a 16-week period, significant improvement in biometric outcome measures was observed. He was completely weaned off of amlodipine, hydrochlorothiazide, glipizide, and neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. Follow-up blood pressure remained below 125/60 mmHg, HbA1C improved to 6.3%, and total cholesterol improved to 138 mg/dL.

The presented case is a dramatic example of the effect a plant-based diet can have on biometric outcomes like blood pressure, diabetes, and lipid profile.

Yes, indeedy.  In this paper, ladies and gentlemen, we present the case of a guy whose blood sugar was totally whacked.  He was told to cut out meat and eggs, even though they don’t raise blood sugar more than a smidge.  He was also told to limit bread, rice, potatoes, tortillas and other plant foods that jack up blood sugar to a single serving per day.  And looky there, his glucose level plummeted – which proves how wondrous the Holy Plant-Based Diet can be.

Head. Bang. On. Desk.

This is, of course, the bait-and-switch the plant-based apostles pull all the time.  I call it the Ornish Two-Step.  Take people eating total crap diets full of processed sugar and starch, get them to eat whole foods while cutting out all the processed sugars and starches – oh, and meat and eggs, too – and when their health improves, claim you’ve just made a solid case for eliminating meat and eggs.

The improvement in blood pressure observed over a 4-month period with few medications is also rarely encountered in clinical practice and is likely related to a low-sodium diet and the avoidance of red meat.

Uh, no.  In clinical studies, reducing sodium intake has failed rather spectacularly as a treatment for high blood pressure.  And as for red meat causing high blood pressure, here’s the conclusion from a recent meta-analysis at Purdue University:

Consuming red meat in amounts above what is typically recommended does not affect short-term cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as blood pressure and blood cholesterol.

However, several studies have demonstrated that a high sugar intake will raise blood pressure.  So remind me: wasn’t the guy in this case study told to eliminate sugar from his diet?  And isn’t sugar a plant food?

If people want to adopt plant-based diets for ethical reasons, fine, I don’t care.  But I do care when apostles of the Church of the Holy Plant-Based Diet blame meat and eggs for the sins committed by sugar and other processed carbohydrates.  Part of the reason it annoys me so much is that it’s clear the apostles KNOW it’s the processed carbs doing the damage. They toss meat and eggs in the same basket as sugar and white bread simply because they don’t want people to eat meat.

If the apostles really and truly believed animal foods are the primary drivers of disease, they’d conduct studies where the only change in a crappy diet is to substitute tofu for meat.  And they’d encourage physicians to offer counseling to patients that goes something like this:

“Well, I’m afraid your labs are awful.  Your blood sugar is through the roof and you’re obviously a type II diabetic.  We need to switch you to a plant-based diet.”

“Wait, Doc, you mean no more meat and eggs?”

“That’s right.”

“Bummer.  But I can still eat Pop-Tarts for breakfast, right?”

“Of course.  Pop-Tarts are made from wheat, sugar, soybean oil, dried berries and corn syrup.  Those are all plant foods, so they won’t hurt you.”

“Hostess Ho-Ho’s okay for lunch?”

“Sugar, wheat flour, corn syrup, and hydrogenated palm oil.  No animal ingredients, so they’re fine.”

“Awesome.  But what about dinner?  My wife likes to make casseroles.”

“No problem.  The makers of Vegan Toona say it makes a terrific ‘toona’ casserole.”

 

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88 thoughts on “Here’s How The (ahem) ‘Plant-Based Diet’ Improves Health

  1. Randal L. Schwartz

    «If people want to adopt plant-based diets for ethical reasons, fine, I don’t care. But I do care when apostles of the Church of the Holy Plant-Based Diet blame meat and eggs for the sins committed by sugar and other processed carbohydrates. Part of the reason it annoys me so much is that it’s clear the apostles KNOW it’s the processed carbs doing the damage. They toss meat and eggs in the same basket as sugar and white bread simply because they don’t want people to eat meat.»

    Hear hear. I’ve said this often… I don’t have a problem with people who say they are veg*an for moral reasons… but as soon as you bring up health… I WILL ARGUE.

    Reply
    1. Malaena Medford

      I argue against moral or ethical reasons. Monocrops to sustain vegan foods like soy destroy thousands of acres of land and have put the honeybee on the endangered species list. Furthermore, the pesticides and tilling kill more animals than the meat industry (which is owned by the agriculture industry to get rid of plant waste) and completely topple the ecological balance of the land it occupies. Another fact is that those industries use undocumented immigrants as a sort of slave labor, thus endangering lives and also harming the economy with the introduction of a people who don’t add to the economy but take from it. Last – what is moral or ethical about avoiding meat when all animals, even herbivores, eat meat? Their version of morality is a skewed sense of superiority based on a religious cult, the 7th Day Adventists, and a complete disconnection from nature, itself. They are nothing more than uneducated, spoilt brats who want their own way despite the empirical evidence that it causes subclinical malnutrition, infertility, brain deterioration, and psychosis. Having tried the diet, I can assure anyone that it’s not healthy at all.

      Reply
      1. Tom Naughton

        Agreed, but people who choose a vegetarian diet for ethical reasons are unaware of those issues. They think they’re doing the right thing.

        Reply
  2. Lori Miller

    “Despite the strong body of evidence favoring plant-based diets, including studies showing a willingness of the general public to embrace them, many physicians are not stressing the importance of plant-based diets as a first-line treatment for chronic illnesses. This could be because of a lack of awareness of these diets or a lack of patient education resources.”

    So, the general public is willing to embrace vegan diets, yet doctors haven’t even heard of them? I’ve fact-checked a vegan book and a vegan book chapter. They were both full of whoppers like this.

    Reply
  3. Randal L. Schwartz

    «If people want to adopt plant-based diets for ethical reasons, fine, I don’t care. But I do care when apostles of the Church of the Holy Plant-Based Diet blame meat and eggs for the sins committed by sugar and other processed carbohydrates. Part of the reason it annoys me so much is that it’s clear the apostles KNOW it’s the processed carbs doing the damage. They toss meat and eggs in the same basket as sugar and white bread simply because they don’t want people to eat meat.»

    Hear hear. I’ve said this often… I don’t have a problem with people who say they are veg*an for moral reasons… but as soon as you bring up health… I WILL ARGUE.

    Reply
    1. Malaena Medford

      I argue against moral or ethical reasons. Monocrops to sustain vegan foods like soy destroy thousands of acres of land and have put the honeybee on the endangered species list. Furthermore, the pesticides and tilling kill more animals than the meat industry (which is owned by the agriculture industry to get rid of plant waste) and completely topple the ecological balance of the land it occupies. Another fact is that those industries use undocumented immigrants as a sort of slave labor, thus endangering lives and also harming the economy with the introduction of a people who don’t add to the economy but take from it. Last – what is moral or ethical about avoiding meat when all animals, even herbivores, eat meat? Their version of morality is a skewed sense of superiority based on a religious cult, the 7th Day Adventists, and a complete disconnection from nature, itself. They are nothing more than uneducated, spoilt brats who want their own way despite the empirical evidence that it causes subclinical malnutrition, infertility, brain deterioration, and psychosis. Having tried the diet, I can assure anyone that it’s not healthy at all.

      Reply
      1. Tom Naughton Post author

        Agreed, but people who choose a vegetarian diet for ethical reasons are unaware of those issues. They think they’re doing the right thing.

        Reply
  4. j

    Pea protein, pea starch, water, olive oil, potato starch, sea salt, seaweed powder, organic agave nectar, organic apple cider vinegar, konjac powder, ginger.

    Sounds like a bad attempt at making hummus.

    Not a fan of canned tuna anyway..you reallly have to dress it up to make it remotely edible

    Reply
  5. Lori Miller

    “Despite the strong body of evidence favoring plant-based diets, including studies showing a willingness of the general public to embrace them, many physicians are not stressing the importance of plant-based diets as a first-line treatment for chronic illnesses. This could be because of a lack of awareness of these diets or a lack of patient education resources.”

    So, the general public is willing to embrace vegan diets, yet doctors haven’t even heard of them? I’ve fact-checked a vegan book and a vegan book chapter. They were both full of whoppers like this.

    Reply
  6. j

    Pea protein, pea starch, water, olive oil, potato starch, sea salt, seaweed powder, organic agave nectar, organic apple cider vinegar, konjac powder, ginger.

    Sounds like a bad attempt at making hummus.

    Not a fan of canned tuna anyway..you reallly have to dress it up to make it remotely edible

    Reply
  7. James H

    Silly me…will I ever learn? The expression “eat a plant-based diet” only recently entered my conscience and I *assumed* it meant something like “mostly whole plants and a moderate (animal) protein intake.” Sheesh. It appears it’s just another relabeling of veganism, rather like Global Warming = Climate Change.

    I should tatoo “never assume” on the back of my hand.

    Reply
  8. Orvan Taurus

    Alright, a matter of taste, but that ‘toona’ manages to be even less appetizing than ‘tuna’ (which I know many like, but to me it _is_ stinky cat food) says all I need to know about it, really.

    On another topic, I made the ‘Fat Head Pizza’ last week and goofed, using coconut flour instead of almond flour – withOUT adjusting the amount. Thicker crust than I cared for, but so very filling. I made it again a couple days ago, this time using the almond flour as called for. The result… thinner crust but it didn’t seem so filling – I actually did eat half the pizza, rather than only a quarter, at a time. Perhaps I need to try again sometime, using a mix that backs off some of the almond flour and replaces it with some coconut flour?

    That said, even “pigging out” like that, there has been weight reduction – and hunger is if not unknown, at least reduced to a signal rather than a demand,

    Reply
  9. Firebird7478

    “One of the worst vegan products I’ve ever tried. It looks smells and tastes like cat food.”

    It’s kind of disturbing to know that this vegan once ate cat food.

    Reply
      1. Walter

        Just in case anyone here doesn’t know cats are obligate carnivores, taurine is an essential nutrient not found in vegan food along with what vegan humans must supplement at least.

        Reply
  10. Michael B

    Well, you know what they say (actually, it was from the Friday Night News Quiz on BBC): Tofu is proof that God hates vegans.

    Reply
  11. James H

    Silly me…will I ever learn? The expression “eat a plant-based diet” only recently entered my conscience and I *assumed* it meant something like “mostly whole plants and a moderate (animal) protein intake.” Sheesh. It appears it’s just another relabeling of veganism, rather like Global Warming = Climate Change.

    I should tatoo “never assume” on the back of my hand.

    Reply
  12. Orvan Taurus

    Alright, a matter of taste, but that ‘toona’ manages to be even less appetizing than ‘tuna’ (which I know many like, but to me it _is_ stinky cat food) says all I need to know about it, really.

    On another topic, I made the ‘Fat Head Pizza’ last week and goofed, using coconut flour instead of almond flour – withOUT adjusting the amount. Thicker crust than I cared for, but so very filling. I made it again a couple days ago, this time using the almond flour as called for. The result… thinner crust but it didn’t seem so filling – I actually did eat half the pizza, rather than only a quarter, at a time. Perhaps I need to try again sometime, using a mix that backs off some of the almond flour and replaces it with some coconut flour?

    That said, even “pigging out” like that, there has been weight reduction – and hunger is if not unknown, at least reduced to a signal rather than a demand,

    Reply
  13. Firebird7478

    “One of the worst vegan products I’ve ever tried. It looks smells and tastes like cat food.”

    It’s kind of disturbing to know that this vegan once ate cat food.

    Reply
      1. Walter

        Just in case anyone here doesn’t know cats are obligate carnivores, taurine is an essential nutrient not found in vegan food along with what vegan humans must supplement at least.

        Reply
  14. Michael B

    Well, you know what they say (actually, it was from the Friday Night News Quiz on BBC): Tofu is proof that God hates vegans.

    Reply
  15. Jamie

    As someone diagnosed with insulin resistant PCOS I can attest to the fact that it doesn’t mean you’re fat. I’m 5’2″ and was 110 lbs before I had 3 children. Thanks to my protein, fat and plant-based diet (and maybe some genetics) and in spite of my insulin resistance I am currently 2 months postpartum and only 114 lbs. So you know, not fat.

    And as the mother of small children, sugar is the devil. I can tell when I’ve even had too much (and it doesn’t take much) with how erratic my mood becomes and the overall blah feeling I end up with.

    So I never did eat those twizzlers.

    Reply
    1. K2

      Hi Jamie and all,

      Absolutely. When younger and much heavier, I had several classic PCOS symptoms, but was not diagnosed with it (was before PCOS was clearly defined). There is a lot of diabetes in my family, too.

      Just yesterday I had received the results of my first hba1c test: 5.7. The ADA says that’s the low end of pre-diabetes. I’m 5’3.5″ and 116 lbs. Also, I’ve been running for 39 years.

      I’ve gone back and forth between low carb and higher, “plant based” carb, because I thought given my activity and BMI (20.5), I was “safe” despite my genetics. Nope.

      Still waiting for the doctor to respond to my question about the test results. You can bet my action will be no meds and a low-carb-real-food way of eating.

      Thanks so much, Tom, for the sanity, insight and humor you bring to all of us.

      K2

      Reply
  16. Jamie

    As someone diagnosed with insulin resistant PCOS I can attest to the fact that it doesn’t mean you’re fat. I’m 5’2″ and was 110 lbs before I had 3 children. Thanks to my protein, fat and plant-based diet (and maybe some genetics) and in spite of my insulin resistance I am currently 2 months postpartum and only 114 lbs. So you know, not fat.

    And as the mother of small children, sugar is the devil. I can tell when I’ve even had too much (and it doesn’t take much) with how erratic my mood becomes and the overall blah feeling I end up with.

    So I never did eat those twizzlers.

    Reply
    1. K2

      Hi Jamie and all,

      Absolutely. When younger and much heavier, I had several classic PCOS symptoms, but was not diagnosed with it (was before PCOS was clearly defined). There is a lot of diabetes in my family, too.

      Just yesterday I had received the results of my first hba1c test: 5.7. The ADA says that’s the low end of pre-diabetes. I’m 5’3.5″ and 116 lbs. Also, I’ve been running for 39 years.

      I’ve gone back and forth between low carb and higher, “plant based” carb, because I thought given my activity and BMI (20.5), I was “safe” despite my genetics. Nope.

      Still waiting for the doctor to respond to my question about the test results. You can bet my action will be no meds and a low-carb-real-food way of eating.

      Thanks so much, Tom, for the sanity, insight and humor you bring to all of us.

      K2

      Reply
  17. Trevor

    And let’s not forget all the meat taxes that are being proposed to lower consumption rates. Supposedly its good for the planet, with it being a large portion of our carbon emissions. It sounds more like they’re trying to use force since consumption of beef and pork haven’t fallen fast enough to suit these advocates.

    Reply
    1. Zachary

      Hey, at least the 90% fat ground beef is cheaper because it’s the “less healthy” meat to buy.

      Reply
  18. Dianne

    Ai yi yi yi yi. The people who write and publish such articles must simply assume that they’ll be read and accepted completely uncritically — or they know that they will, and that they can get away with saying just about anything. Once again I wish that “Guides to Straight Thinking,” that wonderful old book about logic fallacies by Stuart Chase, were required reading in every high school. But then, educational systems are under the direction of the government, and if there’s anything politicians don’t want, it’s for people to think straight and to be able to spot illogical arguments and conclusions. The idea probably wouldn’t be too popular with the news media and talk shows, either.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      Unfortunately, it’s not just the government these days. Plenty of college professors don’t want students spotting illogical arguments either. Check out the tweets by @RealPeerReview.

      Reply
  19. Trevor

    And let’s not forget all the meat taxes that are being proposed to lower consumption rates. Supposedly its good for the planet, with it being a large portion of our carbon emissions. It sounds more like they’re trying to use force since consumption of beef and pork haven’t fallen fast enough to suit these advocates.

    Reply
  20. Dianne

    Ai yi yi yi yi. The people who write and publish such articles must simply assume that they’ll be read and accepted completely uncritically — or they know that they will, and that they can get away with saying just about anything. Once again I wish that “Guides to Straight Thinking,” that wonderful old book about logic fallacies by Stuart Chase, were required reading in every high school. But then, educational systems are under the direction of the government, and if there’s anything politicians don’t want, it’s for people to think straight and to be able to spot illogical arguments and conclusions. The idea probably wouldn’t be too popular with the news media and talk shows, either.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Unfortunately, it’s not just the government these days. Plenty of college professors don’t want students spotting illogical arguments either. Check out the tweets by @RealPeerReview.

      Reply
  21. Jan

    To be fair, I’m certain that vegan gurus like Ornish and McDougall never intend for their followers to eat processed fake foods like Toona any more than Paleo and low carb experts intend for people to eat diets filled with crazy treats. But McDoufuss has said he’d rather people eat plain white sugar than a drop of fat, and sees nothing wrong with blood sugars in the 300’s.

    Meanwhile I shake my head every time I hear how 7th day Adventists have their own blue zone. I live in a community with a large Adventist population. In the 80’s there were shelves in the store devoted to processed fake meats marketed to Adventist adherents–really disgusting soy “hot dogs” canned in brine and things like that (very big into fake meats in the 80’s). And when I worked at a nearby Adventist hospital, regular fare in the cafeteria was deep fried soy fish and chicken substitutes (fake shrimp, scallops, chicken nuggets). Nom Nom longevity food!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      Sure, many of the vegan gurus stress the importance of eating whole, unprocessed foods. It’s the way they lump meat and eggs (whole, unprocessed foods) in with bread and sugar that annoys me.

      Reply
    2. Evin

      Having been raised Adventist but never vegetarian, there are a few things I can tell you. First, not all of them are vegetarians. One of my aunts is a vegetarian and told me that when she was younger, it was hard to go to church potluck because hardly anything was vegetarian. Second, several studies have shown Mormons to have similar health advantages to Adventists, despite not being vegetarian. This is most likely due to their abstinence from tobacco and alcohol. Third, Ellen G. White, the prophetess of the Adventist church, long advocated veganism and lived to be 87. Her nephew, Frank Belden, was an Adventist evangelist and hymnwriter. While I don’t know if he was vegetarian or not, he also died at 87, the same age as his aunt. I can name many different people who weren’t vegetarians and lived past 87, and not necessarily people I personally know.

      Reply
  22. Jan

    To be fair, I’m certain that vegan gurus like Ornish and McDougall never intend for their followers to eat processed fake foods like Toona any more than Paleo and low carb experts intend for people to eat diets filled with crazy treats. But McDoufuss has said he’d rather people eat plain white sugar than a drop of fat, and sees nothing wrong with blood sugars in the 300’s.

    Meanwhile I shake my head every time I hear how 7th day Adventists have their own blue zone. I live in a community with a large Adventist population. In the 80’s there were shelves in the store devoted to processed fake meats marketed to Adventist adherents–really disgusting soy “hot dogs” canned in brine and things like that (very big into fake meats in the 80’s). And when I worked at a nearby Adventist hospital, regular fare in the cafeteria was deep fried soy fish and chicken substitutes (fake shrimp, scallops, chicken nuggets). Nom Nom longevity food!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Sure, many of the vegan gurus stress the importance of eating whole, unprocessed foods. It’s the way they lump meat and eggs (whole, unprocessed foods) in with bread and sugar that annoys me.

      Reply
    2. Evin

      Having been raised Adventist but never vegetarian, there are a few things I can tell you. First, not all of them are vegetarians. One of my aunts is a vegetarian and told me that when she was younger, it was hard to go to church potluck because hardly anything was vegetarian. Second, several studies have shown Mormons to have similar health advantages to Adventists, despite not being vegetarian. This is most likely due to their abstinence from tobacco and alcohol. Third, Ellen G. White, the prophetess of the Adventist church, long advocated veganism and lived to be 87. Her nephew, Frank Belden, was an Adventist evangelist and hymnwriter. While I don’t know if he was vegetarian or not, he also died at 87, the same age as his aunt. I can name many different people who weren’t vegetarians and lived past 87, and not necessarily people I personally know.

      Reply
      1. Chris Hansen

        Why did you design a space ship to look like male genitals? And then put it in a children’s book?

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton

          If your male genitals look like The Nautilus spaceship in the book, please go see a doctor immediately. Something is very, very wrong with your anatomy.

          Reply
      1. Chris Hansen

        Why did you design a space ship to look like male genitals? And then put it in a children’s book?

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          If your male genitals look like The Nautilus spaceship in the book, please go see a doctor immediately. Something is very, very wrong with your anatomy.

          Reply
          1. Walter

            There is a shrink joke that is apropos.

            A man is taking a Rorschach test and comes up with lots of obscene responses. The psynk says, my you seem to be obsessed with sex. The man replies, but you’re the man with the dirty pictures.

            Reply
  23. June

    I wish I had know about the benefits of a plant-based diet for Type 2 Diabetes sooner. Here I’ve been maintaining an A1C of 6.1 on a crummy low carb/high fat diet and at my last check-up it had dropped to 5.8. Think of what it would be if only I was eating Vegan Toona.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      Well, you could always try cat food. Based on the Amazon reviews, you wouldn’t know the difference.

      Reply
      1. Walter

        But don’t feed it to your cat. That would be animal abuse, especially if the cat is not getting some meat in addition.

        Reply
  24. June

    I wish I had know about the benefits of a plant-based diet for Type 2 Diabetes sooner. Here I’ve been maintaining an A1C of 6.1 on a crummy low carb/high fat diet and at my last check-up it had dropped to 5.8. Think of what it would be if only I was eating Vegan Toona.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Well, you could always try cat food. Based on the Amazon reviews, you wouldn’t know the difference.

      Reply
      1. Walter

        But don’t feed it to your cat. That would be animal abuse, especially if the cat is not getting some meat in addition.

        Reply
  25. Heather Lapaille

    I’m currently trying to sit through “What the Health” (well, it’s taken me 2 days to get halfway through because my head hurts from pounding it against the wall). Have you watched or heard about this. I just can’t even wrap my head around everything they are telling people. It doesn’t even make sense! Just eat a plant based diet because meat and animal fats cause cancer. *insert sarcasm here*

    Reply
  26. Heather Lapaille

    I’m currently trying to sit through “What the Health” (well, it’s taken me 2 days to get halfway through because my head hurts from pounding it against the wall). Have you watched or heard about this. I just can’t even wrap my head around everything they are telling people. It doesn’t even make sense! Just eat a plant based diet because meat and animal fats cause cancer. *insert sarcasm here*

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      My girls once asked me to grow a mustache (no beard) just to see how it looked. Not a good look. Very ’70s porn actor look.

      Reply
      1. chris c

        I grew the beard as well, that worked. It’s going to have its 50th birthday soon. Sometimes it still reminisces about all the bits of tofu it used to catch, back in the day when I tried a vegan diet. And passed my first gallstone, and had my first attack of gout, and made my diabetes symptoms worse. Yup, real healthy diet.

        Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      My girls once asked me to grow a mustache (no beard) just to see how it looked. Not a good look. Very ’70s porn actor look.

      Reply
      1. chris c

        I grew the beard as well, that worked. It’s going to have its 50th birthday soon. Sometimes it still reminisces about all the bits of tofu it used to catch, back in the day when I tried a vegan diet. And passed my first gallstone, and had my first attack of gout, and made my diabetes symptoms worse. Yup, real healthy diet.

        Reply
          1. chris c

            It’s relieved I never subjected it to vegan tuna.

            Actually I still eat a vegan diet – with my meat. That works.

            Reply
  27. Robert

    Told to cut out meat, eggs, bread, cereal, potatoes, pasta. No I don’t see any confounding variables in this advice. It’s all the animal food’s fault. After watching “Science For Smart People,” I find myself looking for confounding variables in everything. That doctor’s advice fits right on with only spotting a-b correlations he wants to find

    Reply
  28. Robert

    Told to cut out meat, eggs, bread, cereal, potatoes, pasta. No I don’t see any confounding variables in this advice. It’s all the animal food’s fault. After watching “Science For Smart People,” I find myself looking for confounding variables in everything. That doctor’s advice fits right on with only spotting a-b correlations he wants to find

    Reply

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