Archive for April, 2017

Well, one of the nice things about having a book released is that I get to be a return guest on podcast shows I enjoyed the first time.

Back in November, I had the pleasure of talking to Brian Williamson on his Ketovangelist podcast show.  The book was rounding the bend towards completion at the time, so he invited to come back after the release.

You can listen to the new episode here.

Share

Comments 2 Comments »

Last month I was a guest on the Cameron J. English podcast show.  We of course talked about the book, but I don’t believe Cameron had a copy at the time.

He has a copy now, and he wrote a review that provides an excellent summary of the book, both the content and the tone.  Here’s a quote:

The quality I like most about this book is that the Naughtons don’t condescend to their young audience. To be sure, there are colorful graphics and helpful characters (like Mr. Spot and Dr. Fishbones, the science officer and medical officer of the Nautilus, respectively) who help make the subject of the book more comprehensible. But as a science writer, I say without hesitation that the nutrition and food chemistry covered in Fat Head Kids is more comprehensive than anything you’d read in a typical New York Times editorial about obesity–or even many undergraduate nutrition textbooks.

Share

Comments 4 Comments »

Well, this is a great way to start a Friday …

Dr. William “Wheat Belly” Davis posted a very nice review of Fat Head Kids on his Wheat Belly blog.  Here’s a bit of the review:

Even though intended for kids, this book is also perfect for any adult who also wishes to understand why we persist in hearing such dietary fictions such as “Move more, eat less” or “Cut your fat and cholesterol.” Anyone who reads Fat Head Kids will come away with a clear understanding of healthy eating and why following advice like the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans is a recipe for disaster. Imagine Tom’s book became required reading in school–you might just witness a marvelous transformation in their health, appearance, weight, and learning.

Since the book slams the USDA dietary guidelines, I doubt it will ever be required reading in schools.  But we can dream …

Share

Comments 23 Comments »

I was the guest recently (very recently … as in yesterday evening) on Dr. Ron Hoffman’s Intelligent Medicine podcast show.  The episode is available here.

We talked about the book, the Tim Noakes witch-hunt, and other stuff.  Enjoy.

Share

Comments 3 Comments »

Isn’t it nice to wake up in the morning and learn that sanity can still prevail — even when government committees are involved?

Tim Noakes, the victim of an inquisition triggered by an idiot dietician, was found not guilty of unprofessional conduct yesterday.  Here are some quotes from a report by News24 in South Africa:

Professor Tim Noakes has been found not guilty of misconduct, a professional conduct committee found on Friday.

That’s the good news.  Excellent news, in fact.  The bad news is that Noakes was dragged before a committee in the first place.  Read on to see just how ridiculous this entire episode was.

Noakes – whose book The Real Meal Revolution promotes a low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diet – was charged with giving unconventional medical advice via Twitter two years ago after he advised a breastfeeding mother to wean her baby onto LCHF.

Charged with giving unconventional advice … riiiight, because the conventional dietary advice handed down since the 1970s has done such a bang-up job of improving people’s health worldwide.

The independent committee made its finding following a protracted hearing into a complaint by the former president of the Association for Dietetics in South Africa, Claire Julsing-Strydom. She had complained about Noakes giving advice relating to his LCHF diet on Twitter to a mother.

And why did Julsing-Strydom (the idiot dietitian) feel the need to bring charges?  Was Noakes going around giving unsolicited, unconventional advice?  Was he sneaking into people’s homes and feeding their kids an “unconventional” diet when the parents weren’t looking?

The mother’s tweet read: “@ProfTimNoakes @SalCreed is LCHF eating ok for breastfeeding mums? Worried about all the dairy + cauliflower = wind for babies?? [sic]” Noakes advised her to wean her child onto LCHF foods, which he described as “real” foods.

His tweet read: “Baby doesn’t eat the dairy and cauliflower. Just very healthy high-fat breast milk. Key is to ween [sic] baby onto LCHF.”

So there’s the basis for the witch hunt:  a mother SPECIFICALLY ASKED NOAKES FOR ADVICE on Twitter, and he replied.  His reply went against the arterycloggingsaturatedfat! and hearthealthywholegrains! nonsense promoted by the Axis of Incompetence, so one of its members decided she’d try to ruin his life and his career.

Earlier in the hearing, which started in 2015, witnesses for the HPCSA said a consultation was required before any advice could be given or diagnosis made.

A mother asks Noakes for advice online, and he’s supposed to tell her sorry, we need to have a consultation in my office?  And what the @#$% kind of diagnosis is required in this situation?  The mom didn’t say her baby had a strange rash and ask for an online prescription.  She asked a question about diet … and since she asked Noakes, it means she obviously respects his opinion on the matter.

Noakes questioned why Leenstra, who ostensibly could have suffered harm, did not lay the charge. He argued he did not give advice on breastfeeding, but on weaning.

BINGO!!  The mother who asked for advice didn’t complain.  A dietitian who had nothing to do with the situation complained.  This is, of course, what The Anointed are all about: restricting other people’s speech and freedoms — for their own good, of course.

Noakes alleged that Julsing-Strydom’s complaint was not centred on breastfeeding, but on the diet he advocates in his book, of which she did not approve.

Of course that was the basis of her complaint.

The HPCSA argues that Noakes gave unconventional and unscientific advice, and was unprofessional in his conduct for dispensing the advice via social media.

You want to see unscientific advice? Look no further than arterycloggingsaturatedfat! and hearthealthywholegrains!

As for giving advice via social media being unprofessional … does any sane person believe Julsing-Strydom and the other dietary fascists would have gone after a doctor who advised the mother to wean her baby on hearthealthywholegrains?

Out of curiosity, I just checked Twitter to see if The American Heart Association tweets dietary advice.  Yup.  I guess somebody needs to drag them before a committee for engaging in unprofessional conduct … you know, giving out advice online without a proper consultation and all that.

Two international witnesses testified in his defence – diet and health researcher Dr Zoe Harcombe from London, and investigative journalist Nina Teicholz from New York, who is the author of The Big Fat Surprise, which “explains the politics, personalities, and history of how we came to believe that dietary fat is bad for health”.

And bless you both, ladies.

Professor Willie Pienaar, a psychiatrist and part-time bioethicist, during the hearing said that doctors cannot give expert advice without consultation. He argued that Noakes had the opportunity to refer the mother to a general practitioner, and pointed out that he didn’t ask the age or health status of the baby.

“Professor Noakes, what foods should I feed my baby?”

“I’m sorry, Mom, I’ll have to refer you to a general practitioner who will give advice I believe with all my heart and soul is completely wrong.”

He said his main concern was that Noakes had given specialist advice via social media and that consultation was key to giving the correct diagnosis.

Again, exactly what kind of diagnosis is required when a mother asks for general dietary advice? What diagnosis does the American Heart Association make before going online and telling people to replace butter with corn and canola oil?

Expert witness Professor Este Vorster, a former president of the Nutrition Society of SA, said Noakes could not give convincing evidence that his was the optimal diet for lactating mothers.

The Anointed can’t give convincing evidence that vegetable oils and grains are the optimal diet.  But they’ll keep pushing them and occasionally conduct a witch-hunt when a prominent doctor dares to disagree.  Thank goodness The Anointed lost this round.  Let’s hope they lose many, many more.

In the meantime, let’s celebrate the decision — even though there never should have been a trial in the first place — and applaud Tim Noakes for having the backbone to stand up to these bullies.

Share

Comments 77 Comments »

Another podcast about the book for kids: I was recently interviewed on the Cameron J. English podcast show.

Cameron writes blog posts and does podcasts about science, public policy and politics.  He’s a very bright and well-read guy with libertarian leanings, so of course I’m a fan of his work.

Share

Comments 17 Comments »