A Fond Farewell to Dr. Duane Graveline

      93 Comments on A Fond Farewell to Dr. Duane Graveline

I had another topic in mind for tonight’s post, but I would be remiss if I didn’t post a farewell to Dr. Duane Graveline, who I consider a modern medical hero.

I don’t remember exactly how I ended up coming across SpaceDoc.com, a site he created to educate people about the side-effects of statins.  I know it was during the research phase for Fat Head.  I was pretty well convinced by then that cholesterol doesn’t cause heart disease, which of course means statins are nearly worthless.  It was only after reading articles by Dr. Graveline that I began to see that statins are worse than worthless.  They cause actual damage to millions of unsuspecting people who are merely following doctor’s orders.

For those of you who don’t know, Dr. Graveline was an M.D., a flight surgeon in the Air Force, and a researcher for NASA.  In other words, the man knew his medical science.  So when he began experiencing strange side-effects after being prescribed Lipitor for his “high” cholesterol, he approached it as science problem.  He went on and off Lipitor a few times and tracked his symptoms.

Those symptoms weren’t pretty.  On two different occasions, his spent entire days in a state of profound confusion, unable to remember, say, anything since before medical school.  Then his memory would return.  The condition is known as transient global amnesia, and as Dr. Graveline discovered when he began investigating, it’s hardly an unknown experience among people on statins.

It was while reading those accounts that I had a major head-slapping, if-only-I-had-a-time-machine moment.  When my dad was in his late 50s (in other words, around my current age), he had two similar experiences.  He became confused and babbled nonsense.  He couldn’t remember my sister’s name as she talked to him and tried to figure out what the hell was happening to him.  On both occasions he was taken to a hospital … and on both occasions, doctors ran tests and told my mom they couldn’t find anything actually wrong with him.  Then the confusion cleared and his memory came back – exactly what Dr. Graveline experienced.

Naturally, it didn’t occur to any of the doctors examining my dad to ask if he was on Lipitor … which he was, and a high dose at that.  Although I can’t prove it, I’m convinced the Lipitor either triggered or accelerated my dad’s Alzheimer’s.   So instead of spending his well-deserved retirement playing golf, he spent most of it in a home for Alzheimer’s patients.

When my mom was on statins, she experienced nasty muscle and joint pains – which of course her doctor didn’t attribute to the statins.  But I did, thanks to the work of people like Dr. Graveline and Dr. Malcolm Kendrick.  Dr. Graveline, in fact, ended up with permanently damaged muscles as a parting gift from the makers of Lipitor.

The SpaceDoc site is chock-full of research on statins in particular and heart health in general.  I doubt many people in the Fat Head audience need convincing about the dangers of statins, but it’s worth visiting the site anyway just to see how much information Dr. Graveline gathered over the years in his one-man battle to educate an unsuspecting public.

Many of you have emailed or left comments to thank me for sounding the alarm about statins.  Don’t thank me.  Thank Dr. Graveline, who continued fighting the good fight all the way to age 85.  It’s largely because of his fight that some of us respond to “Your cholesterol is high.  We should put you on a statin” with “Doctor, I wouldn’t take a statin unless you held a gun to my head and I was convinced you’d pull the trigger.”

Godspeed, SpaceDoc.

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93 thoughts on “A Fond Farewell to Dr. Duane Graveline

  1. Galina L.

    Recently I’ve decided to re-start a hormone-replacement therapy, and the therapist, while discussing my blood test, made a scene of me refusing even discuss my “high” total cholesterol of 255(she ran behind me and started to listen to my heart with a concerned face, than ran back to her chair shaking her head in a mourning fashion), with the rest of numbers totally spectacular as they should be after low-carbing and eating good fats since 2007. She wanted me to buy some natural cholesterol-lowering remedy. I told her I didn’t come to her to discuss my metabolic numbers and I payed for the appointment to discuss female hormones supplementation. I remember one of your blog visitors complained in comments about a red yeasts extract made her into an almost crippled state. I think not only a Lipitor or Crestor deserve condemnation, but the whole idea of interfering with your own cholesterol production with pharma masterpieces or poisons found in Nature.

    Reply
    1. BobM

      Galina, I applaud you.

      As an aside, I recommend the following:

      https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/

      Start at What Causes Heart Disease Part I and read to part 20 (or XX if you like Roman numerals). I think this theory is likely correct, or at least a lot more correct than the lipid hypothesis.

      Reply
      1. Galina L.

        Thank you. When I was looking at the graphs of cardiovascular events at the times of change in two Baltic states it the link your provided, I couldn’t miss the fact that it correlated quite well with my father’s death at 1987 at the age 51(he was not a smoker or a drinker,and he was absolutely not fat), when it was a Perestroika time in Russia, and many disturbing facts were revealed.

        Reply
  2. Galina L.

    Recently I’ve decided to re-start a hormone-replacement therapy, and the therapist, while discussing my blood test, made a scene of me refusing even discuss my “high” total cholesterol of 255(she ran behind me and started to listen to my heart with a concerned face, than ran back to her chair shaking her head in a mourning fashion), with the rest of numbers totally spectacular as they should be after low-carbing and eating good fats since 2007. She wanted me to buy some natural cholesterol-lowering remedy. I told her I didn’t come to her to discuss my metabolic numbers and I payed for the appointment to discuss female hormones supplementation. I remember one of your blog visitors complained in comments about a red yeasts extract made her into an almost crippled state. I think not only a Lipitor or Crestor deserve condemnation, but the whole idea of interfering with your own cholesterol production with pharma masterpieces or poisons found in Nature.

    Reply
    1. BobM

      Galina, I applaud you.

      As an aside, I recommend the following:

      https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/

      Start at What Causes Heart Disease Part I and read to part 20 (or XX if you like Roman numerals). I think this theory is likely correct, or at least a lot more correct than the lipid hypothesis.

      Reply
      1. Galina L.

        Thank you. When I was looking at the graphs of cardiovascular events at the times of change in two Baltic states it the link your provided, I couldn’t miss the fact that it correlated quite well with my father’s death at 1987 at the age 51(he was not a smoker or a drinker,and he was absolutely not fat), when it was a Perestroika time in Russia, and many disturbing facts were revealed.

        Reply
  3. Linda

    Thank you so much for your tribute to Dr. Graveline! It is wonderful and I shed a few tears for that great man!. Don’t undersell yourself, though. I would have never found the wealth of info on spacedoc.com if I hadn’t been reading this blog. Thanks again for all you do!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      That’s how I see my role in things. I don’t generate the information, but I can help spread it around cyberspace.

      Reply
  4. Sally Myles

    The info you gave and the links you provided me with have made it possible for me to convince my very stubborn Mother that a statin would be literally poison for her.

    Her GP suggested one, as are his guidelines from the government, despite her cholesterol and risk factors not changing in the slightest, just the goalposts being moved again.

    She doesn’t normally listen to me, she trusts the white coats, but she trusts me on this. So thank you. She wouldn’t if it wasn’t for you giving me this info.

    Reply
  5. Linda

    Thank you so much for your tribute to Dr. Graveline! It is wonderful and I shed a few tears for that great man!. Don’t undersell yourself, though. I would have never found the wealth of info on spacedoc.com if I hadn’t been reading this blog. Thanks again for all you do!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      That’s how I see my role in things. I don’t generate the information, but I can help spread it around cyberspace.

      Reply
  6. Sally Myles

    The info you gave and the links you provided me with have made it possible for me to convince my very stubborn Mother that a statin would be literally poison for her.

    Her GP suggested one, as are his guidelines from the government, despite her cholesterol and risk factors not changing in the slightest, just the goalposts being moved again.

    She doesn’t normally listen to me, she trusts the white coats, but she trusts me on this. So thank you. She wouldn’t if it wasn’t for you giving me this info.

    Reply
  7. John_K

    Seen the latest study from University of Oxford’s Nuffield Department of Population Health
    showing how the poor misunderstood statin is actually wonderful, Tom?

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      I love it when statin-pushing doctors quote studies conducted by statin-makers as proof that statins are wunnerful, wunnerful drugs.

      Reply
  8. Rob

    Ive a friend at work (aged 48 ) who was advised to take this ” New statin drug ” because his cholesterol was “Too high ” .. After 6 months he started complaining that his knees were cracking when he went upstairs or squatted down ,, after months of trying to convince him to stop taking the ” Life saving drug ” he finally told the Doc he wanted out ! .. 3 months later his knees have miraculously stopped clicking and hurting ,, mind you .. he might die 4 days earlier !!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      Amazing, isn’t it? The statin-pushers insist side effects are rare, and yet every other person I know who’s tried statins has had one of those rare side effects.

      Reply
      1. KidPsych

        One of the advantages that statin makers have is that the drug is so often prescribed to the elderly, who often do struggle with a decline in memory and muscle strength. My FIL historically has wielded an impressive memory (he’s even a three time Jeopardy winner), but as he’s hit his 75th birthday, he is really struggling to recall facts and details. He’s also shown signs of muscle pain.

        I’m in an awkward position because I’m not an MD (I’m a psychologist), so I am careful not to overstep my scope of practice, but I have implored him to talk to his doctor about these concerns.

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton

          Yup, you take the drug, you get the memory and muscle problems, and the doc says it’s because you’re old.

          Reply
  9. John_K

    Seen the latest study from University of Oxford’s Nuffield Department of Population Health
    showing how the poor misunderstood statin is actually wonderful, Tom?

    Reply
  10. Dianne

    The man was one of the heroes of medicine — but so are you for gathering so much valuable information together and making it accessible.

    A couple of weeks ago I went to my doctor’s office to get the results of some blood tests, and my doctor’s young PA tried to convince me to take a statin. When I refused she assured me that the life-saving benefits of statins outweigh any side effects they might have. I want to put together a small packet of material to try to convince her otherwise. Are there two or three readable studies you’d recommend? I plan to give her a copy of The Great Cholesterol Con by Malcolm Kendrick, but maybe if I can give her a few pages of solid information with it, it might convince her I haven’t fallen victim to medical quackery and might lure her into reading the book. I know you’ve done at least one post on how to read statistics and how numbers can be made to lie, or at least to trick us, and how that applies to statins. I definitely want to dig that out and print it off for her.

    Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      The SpaceDoc site is actually an excellent resource for studies on statins. So is healthydietsandscience.blogspot.com.

      You can make the effort, of course, but don’t be surprised if the PA isn’t convinced.

      Reply
      1. Dianne

        Well, if I don’t at least try, then the bad advice she gives is partly on my head. If I try and she doesn’t listen, then the bad advice she gives is on her head. But since I’ve seen what statins can do to people (“rare” side effects my foot), I need to try. Maybe if nothing else I’ll plant a seed.

        Meantime, thank you for your recommendations.

        Reply
  11. Rob

    Ive a friend at work (aged 48 ) who was advised to take this ” New statin drug ” because his cholesterol was “Too high ” .. After 6 months he started complaining that his knees were cracking when he went upstairs or squatted down ,, after months of trying to convince him to stop taking the ” Life saving drug ” he finally told the Doc he wanted out ! .. 3 months later his knees have miraculously stopped clicking and hurting ,, mind you .. he might die 4 days earlier !!

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Amazing, isn’t it? The statin-pushers insist side effects are rare, and yet every other person I know who’s tried statins has had one of those rare side effects.

      Reply
      1. KidPsych

        One of the advantages that statin makers have is that the drug is so often prescribed to the elderly, who often do struggle with a decline in memory and muscle strength. My FIL historically has wielded an impressive memory (he’s even a three time Jeopardy winner), but as he’s hit his 75th birthday, he is really struggling to recall facts and details. He’s also shown signs of muscle pain.

        I’m in an awkward position because I’m not an MD (I’m a psychologist), so I am careful not to overstep my scope of practice, but I have implored him to talk to his doctor about these concerns.

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          Yup, you take the drug, you get the memory and muscle problems, and the doc says it’s because you’re old.

          Reply
  12. Dianne

    The man was one of the heroes of medicine — but so are you for gathering so much valuable information together and making it accessible.

    A couple of weeks ago I went to my doctor’s office to get the results of some blood tests, and my doctor’s young PA tried to convince me to take a statin. When I refused she assured me that the life-saving benefits of statins outweigh any side effects they might have. I want to put together a small packet of material to try to convince her otherwise. Are there two or three readable studies you’d recommend? I plan to give her a copy of The Great Cholesterol Con by Malcolm Kendrick, but maybe if I can give her a few pages of solid information with it, it might convince her I haven’t fallen victim to medical quackery and might lure her into reading the book. I know you’ve done at least one post on how to read statistics and how numbers can be made to lie, or at least to trick us, and how that applies to statins. I definitely want to dig that out and print it off for her.

    Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      The SpaceDoc site is actually an excellent resource for studies on statins. So is healthydietsandscience.blogspot.com.

      You can make the effort, of course, but don’t be surprised if the PA isn’t convinced.

      Reply
      1. Dianne

        Well, if I don’t at least try, then the bad advice she gives is partly on my head. If I try and she doesn’t listen, then the bad advice she gives is on her head. But since I’ve seen what statins can do to people (“rare” side effects my foot), I need to try. Maybe if nothing else I’ll plant a seed.

        Meantime, thank you for your recommendations.

        Reply
        1. Tom Naughton Post author

          Sure, it’s worth a try. But some medical types aren’t open to being convinced by mere laypersons, no matter what research we dig up. Either way, good on you for making the effort.

          Reply
        1. pam

          i feel so sorry for him & his wife for his struggle in the last 15 years. impressed what he had accomplished despite his condition.

          just imagine he & your dad & many elderly could enjoy much much more in their golden years. sigh

          RIP

          Reply
    2. The Older Brother

      Try “Statins Toxic Side Effects” by David Evans (it’s got an introduction by some Tom Naughton guy). It provides summaries of 500 studies across a range from anecdotal to clinical covering all sorts of manifestations of statin effects. Many of the citations are from med pubs that your local statin pusher would have to acknowledge as authoritative. Refer the PA to a couple and ask her to address them before asking you to take them.

      Cheers

      Reply
  13. Bruce

    Thank you and thank you Dr. Graveline. My insurance provider had sent me an email that I had an important message. I checked my online account with them. What popped up was a reminder to “discuss statins with my doctor”
    I ignored it, but 5 days later it emailed me again, checked again, same message. I had to delete the message as if it was something I accomplished. Nice racket.

    Reply
      1. Walter Bushell

        And that’s just the cost of the statins. Just think of all the diabetes treatments and supplies, treatment for early dementia etcetera.

        Reply
  14. Bruce

    Thank you and thank you Dr. Graveline. My insurance provider had sent me an email that I had an important message. I checked my online account with them. What popped up was a reminder to “discuss statins with my doctor”
    I ignored it, but 5 days later it emailed me again, checked again, same message. I had to delete the message as if it was something I accomplished. Nice racket.

    Reply
      1. Walter Bushell

        And that’s just the cost of the statins. Just think of all the diabetes treatments and supplies, treatment for early dementia etcetera.

        Reply
  15. cub

    My previous pcp wanted to push statins on me until I told him one day that if high cholesterol was bad how come folks with high cholesterol live longest.

    Reply
      1. cub

        He didn’t say a word. What could he say? But next time he started again with the well scripted statins’ rant and I dropped him.

        Reply
  16. cub

    My previous pcp wanted to push statins on me until I told him one day that if high cholesterol was bad how come folks with high cholesterol live longest.

    Reply
      1. cub

        He didn’t say a word. What could he say? But next time he started again with the well scripted statins’ rant and I dropped him.

        Reply
  17. Linda

    Dianne- About three years ago, when I became crippled by statin drugs…at that time, I couldn’t walk at all and was in a wheel chair. My PA didn’t believe the statins had done this, but they had. After much self-inflicted physical therapy and taking massive doses of beef collagen, and a lot of research into diet, I managed to get to the point of being able to walk with a walker. Spend some time on spacedoc.com as I did. But, just a tip- don’t give her web sites to investigate. Just make copies of pertinent articles and you stand a chance of it being read. “The Great Cholesterol Con” is a great book to give! Go to Dr. Kendrick’s site and type in “statin side effects” in the search bar and it will bring up other great articles. End result is that my PA actually believes what I gave her about statins and no longer prescribes them- took two years. She passed all the info along to the doc she works under and sort of has that doc’s approval. It’s slow and agonizing to convince medical people. I think I might have been listened to just a wee bit more because I’m a retired RN, but still…. It’s a long slow battle, but I applaud you for making the effort to convince your PA!

    Reply
    1. Dianne

      Thank you, Linda. I’m checking out Malcolm Kendrick’s site — some good stuff there about statin side effects and tricky statistics, among other things. I’m still looking for something specific about statins and women, but am sure I’ll find it. Will also return to Dr. Graveline’s site as well. I think I’ll also print out this item from the Weston A. Price Foundation http://www.westonaprice.org/modern-diseases/dangers-of-statin-drugs-what-you-havent-been-told-about-popular-cholesterol-lowering-medicines/. I did think at first about giving my PA some website addresses, but decided it would be much better to print out the articles — no effort on her part involved.

      I’m sorry you had to come by your first-hand knowledge of the dangers of statins in such a drastic and life-changing way. Bless you for hanging in there and trying to keep what happened to you from happening to others. Your being a retired nurse probably does lend weight to your words, but at least there is now a small but growing number of statin skeptics in the medical profession — hopefully the word will spread. Alas, there are also some docs who know the possible side effects but have believed the lie that they are rare and worth the risk. Even as she was pushing statins at me, my doctor was saying that she wouldn’t recommend them for my husband because he already had enough memory problems with his Alzheimer’s. Sighhhhh.

      Reply
  18. Linda

    Dianne- About three years ago, when I became crippled by statin drugs…at that time, I couldn’t walk at all and was in a wheel chair. My PA didn’t believe the statins had done this, but they had. After much self-inflicted physical therapy and taking massive doses of beef collagen, and a lot of research into diet, I managed to get to the point of being able to walk with a walker. Spend some time on spacedoc.com as I did. But, just a tip- don’t give her web sites to investigate. Just make copies of pertinent articles and you stand a chance of it being read. “The Great Cholesterol Con” is a great book to give! Go to Dr. Kendrick’s site and type in “statin side effects” in the search bar and it will bring up other great articles. End result is that my PA actually believes what I gave her about statins and no longer prescribes them- took two years. She passed all the info along to the doc she works under and sort of has that doc’s approval. It’s slow and agonizing to convince medical people. I think I might have been listened to just a wee bit more because I’m a retired RN, but still…. It’s a long slow battle, but I applaud you for making the effort to convince your PA!

    Reply
    1. Dianne

      Thank you, Linda. I’m checking out Malcolm Kendrick’s site — some good stuff there about statin side effects and tricky statistics, among other things. I’m still looking for something specific about statins and women, but am sure I’ll find it. Will also return to Dr. Graveline’s site as well. I think I’ll also print out this item from the Weston A. Price Foundation http://www.westonaprice.org/modern-diseases/dangers-of-statin-drugs-what-you-havent-been-told-about-popular-cholesterol-lowering-medicines/. I did think at first about giving my PA some website addresses, but decided it would be much better to print out the articles — no effort on her part involved.

      I’m sorry you had to come by your first-hand knowledge of the dangers of statins in such a drastic and life-changing way. Bless you for hanging in there and trying to keep what happened to you from happening to others. Your being a retired nurse probably does lend weight to your words, but at least there is now a small but growing number of statin skeptics in the medical profession — hopefully the word will spread. Alas, there are also some docs who know the possible side effects but have believed the lie that they are rare and worth the risk. Even as she was pushing statins at me, my doctor was saying that she wouldn’t recommend them for my husband because he already had enough memory problems with his Alzheimer’s. Sighhhhh.

      Reply
  19. K2

    Thanks for posting such a nice tribute, Tom, as well as the other great information you share. And a belated thanks for Dr. Graveline for his work. I’ve heard of his work and website in the past, but failed to take advantage of it.

    On the topic of cholesterol and statins, my coworker is fighting to lower their cholesterol on their own to avoid going on statins. This person is also very fair and uses very high SPF before ever going out the front door. I shared a theory I have had for a while, somewhat strengthened by references to studies about it in a book I recently read titled “Survival of the Sickest” (an interesting read about what makes us sick now are things that allowed our ancestors to get through an event to reproduce, not for long-term survival). My theory is that warnings to avoid the sun at all costs, low Vit D levels and high cholesterol all kind of track together. Since cholesterol is used in the making of Vit D when unprotected skin is exposed to the sun, it makes sense – to me, anyway – that our levels of Vit D and “healthy” cholesterol might both easily be met by spending time outside in the sun. The book points to higher levels of cholesterol in the winter and lower levels in tanning bed users.

    Correlation, not causation, certainly, but I find it intriguing. And honestly, it fits with the way we were designed to live.

    Again, thank you for your work and blog. I love the farm reports, as I am planning to live a similar lifestyle within the next few years. You and your family are an inspiration!

    Take care.

    K2

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      “Yet there’s another, more effective way to lower glucose levels: Eat less of it.”

      It’s amazing that anyone has to be told this.

      Reply
    2. DELMEM

      Dr Sarah Hallberg (Indiana University) co-wrote the article, she has a small collection of videos on YouTube concerning treatment of diabetes with a low carb diet, weight loss, etc.

      No surprise a few high carb advocates have posted videos insulting her – my favorite is a vegan that points out that carbs are needed to burn fat. Weird that fasting studies (0 carb and 0 everything else for that matter) show a significant amount of fat loss. As Tom’s mentioned before, with some people it doesn’t matter what’s scientifically true, only what they believe.

      Reply
        1. Fede

          Sorry but my n=1 experiment says NO.

          Try to do a ketogenic diet with very limited amounts of proteins and see your muscle disappear.

          Reply
  20. K2

    Thanks for posting such a nice tribute, Tom, as well as the other great information you share. And a belated thanks for Dr. Graveline for his work. I’ve heard of his work and website in the past, but failed to take advantage of it.

    On the topic of cholesterol and statins, my coworker is fighting to lower their cholesterol on their own to avoid going on statins. This person is also very fair and uses very high SPF before ever going out the front door. I shared a theory I have had for a while, somewhat strengthened by references to studies about it in a book I recently read titled “Survival of the Sickest” (an interesting read about what makes us sick now are things that allowed our ancestors to get through an event to reproduce, not for long-term survival). My theory is that warnings to avoid the sun at all costs, low Vit D levels and high cholesterol all kind of track together. Since cholesterol is used in the making of Vit D when unprotected skin is exposed to the sun, it makes sense – to me, anyway – that our levels of Vit D and “healthy” cholesterol might both easily be met by spending time outside in the sun. The book points to higher levels of cholesterol in the winter and lower levels in tanning bed users.

    Correlation, not causation, certainly, but I find it intriguing. And honestly, it fits with the way we were designed to live.

    Again, thank you for your work and blog. I love the farm reports, as I am planning to live a similar lifestyle within the next few years. You and your family are an inspiration!

    Take care.

    K2

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      “Yet there’s another, more effective way to lower glucose levels: Eat less of it.”

      It’s amazing that anyone has to be told this.

      Reply
    2. DELMEM

      Dr Sarah Hallberg (Indiana University) co-wrote the article, she has a small collection of videos on YouTube concerning treatment of diabetes with a low carb diet, weight loss, etc.

      No surprise a few high carb advocates have posted videos insulting her – my favorite is a vegan that points out that carbs are needed to burn fat. Weird that fasting studies (0 carb and 0 everything else for that matter) show a significant amount of fat loss. As Tom’s mentioned before, with some people it doesn’t matter what’s scientifically true, only what they believe.

      Reply
        1. Fede

          Sorry but my n=1 experiment says NO.

          Try to do a ketogenic diet with very limited amounts of proteins and see your muscle disappear.

          Reply
  21. Linda

    I’m amazed and touched that Dr. Graveline’s wife had the courage to do a final update on “My Statin Story!” In my opinion, the whole thing, beginning to end, should be required reading in all medical schools! It’s going to take a lot of ink and paper, but I’m going to print the whole thing to give to a very dear, but stubborn (“my doctor is God”) friend who has just had her statin dose upped. She wonders why she’s having muscle aches, difficulty sleeping and occasional memory lapses!!

    Reply
  22. Linda

    I’m amazed and touched that Dr. Graveline’s wife had the courage to do a final update on “My Statin Story!” In my opinion, the whole thing, beginning to end, should be required reading in all medical schools! It’s going to take a lot of ink and paper, but I’m going to print the whole thing to give to a very dear, but stubborn (“my doctor is God”) friend who has just had her statin dose upped. She wonders why she’s having muscle aches, difficulty sleeping and occasional memory lapses!!

    Reply
  23. Arthur H Hazeldine

    Thanks Tom, you are helping to change the world’s unsuspecting populations’ ideas on health.
    Nothing sharpens the mind like experience, I thank my lucky stars every day for guys like Dr Graveline, his information helped me to pull back from the brink of, who knows what, when I dumped the meds in the bin. My story is on dietdoctor.com under success stories.

    Reply
  24. Arthur H Hazeldine

    Thanks Tom, you are helping to change the world’s unsuspecting populations’ ideas on health.
    Nothing sharpens the mind like experience, I thank my lucky stars every day for guys like Dr Graveline, his information helped me to pull back from the brink of, who knows what, when I dumped the meds in the bin. My story is on dietdoctor.com under success stories.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      That’s why I love the internet and the Wisdom of Crowds effect. Back in the day, a lot of us would have just followed doctor’s orders.

      Reply
  25. Hanes Worthy

    Two minor corrections to your fine article.

    First, the adverse reactions that Dr. Graveline experienced and were NOT merely limited to those on “high dose” statins; just the opposite: according to his testimony, his first dosage of Lipitor was only 10 mg, and his second dosage (after he was persuaded to go back on Lipitor) was 5 mg. In other words, his doses were virtually as low as one can go.

    Second, (and at the risk of seeming overly pedantic) the memory impairment Dr. Graveline suffered is actually called Transient Global Amnesia (TGA), not global transient amnesia. Not critical, but worth noting for the record.

    I am perhaps unusually sensitive to these details as I, too, suffered an almost identical statin-induced case of TGA, as well as subsequent debilitating muscle and joint pains and weakness. That tends to focus your attention.

    Thanks again for your fine tribute to a great and courageous man.

    Reply
  26. Hanes Worthy

    Two minor corrections to your fine article.

    First, the adverse reactions that Dr. Graveline experienced and were NOT merely limited to those on “high dose” statins; just the opposite: according to his testimony, his first dosage of Lipitor was only 10 mg, and his second dosage (after he was persuaded to go back on Lipitor) was 5 mg. In other words, his doses were virtually as low as one can go.

    Second, (and at the risk of seeming overly pedantic) the memory impairment Dr. Graveline suffered is actually called Transient Global Amnesia (TGA), not global transient amnesia. Not critical, but worth noting for the record.

    I am perhaps unusually sensitive to these details as I, too, suffered an almost identical statin-induced case of TGA, as well as subsequent debilitating muscle and joint pains and weakness. That tends to focus your attention.

    Thanks again for your fine tribute to a great and courageous man.

    Reply

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