The Older Brother goes back to grade school

Hiya, Fatheads!

Bad news.

Tom is hard at work on that book/DVD project he’s been teasing us with for the last year or so, which is good. But it’s taking a bit more time and effort for this phase than he’d planned, so you all are stuck with me for another week or so. It should be worth it in the end, so let’s all, as Lone Watie said in the classic “The Outlaw Josey Wales” (played by Chief Dan George) —

“endeavor to persevere.”

BTW, if you’re too young to get that reference, you need to watch that movie. If you don’t have that kind of patience, or if Josey has ended up on the non-PC list, or if you’d just like a reminder of one of the great scenes in movies:

Okay, enough about the first Americans put on a government-run welfare program.

Back here in the present day, I’ve pointed out before the adage that “grandchildren are your reward for not strangling your children when they’re teenagers.” The Wife and I got an invitation to go to breakfast with The Oldest Reward (1st grader) yesterday at her school’s Grandparents Day. It was fun, and well attended.

Of course, you knew this had to be there:

You want to indoctrinate kids when they’re young. Otherwise, they may start thinking for themselves and we all know how messy that can get. Here’s something I never saw posted on the wall in the school cafeteria when I was a kid:

I never saw it, because hypoglycemia is associated with diabetes. Type I (juvenile) diabetes is rare and kids with it don’t need a poster to be aware of it. The other is Type II diabetes, but when we were kids, that didn’t exist. The condition did, of course, but it hadn’t been renamed to Type II diabetes. It was called “Adult Onset diabetes,” because almost no one got it until they were well past school age, usually mid-life and later.

It’s no puzzle to any Fatheads on how you create an unprecedented epidemic of insulin resistance in children. It’s simple. You just feed them breakfasts like this:

Didn’t manage to capture the other offerings in the picture, but you could balance your plate out with oatmeal and/or a plastic wrapped muffin, also. Not a drop of the fat kids need for their brains in sight, and the only protein available was a few grams in the milk. Fat Free!, of course. Ugh. The menu was missing one of last year’s offerings:

Thanks a lot, Michelle Obama.

Leah picked out what she thought looked good, and ate about half of it.

The Wife and I passed on the meal and just enjoyed being with her and her multitude of buddies. I was still fuming over the whole raw milk thing (or as the grandkids call it — “creamy milk!”) and took a look at the label on the fat-free chocolate milk:

Interesting that the FDA, USDA, CDC, and the Illinois State Medical Society are conducting a jihad against raw milk, but don’t seem to have anything but praise for the folks who bring our kids milk concocted with alkali, cornstarch, salt, artificial flavors, and carrageennan. Note also that the label does warn the consumer that this product “CONTAINS: MILK.” You know, just in case anyone was worried about there being milk in their milk.

It was fun being with the Oldest Grandkid, and we got to meet her teacher and see some of the school before she blasted off to the playground to squeeze in some playtime with her buddies before the bell started the school day. But the wife and I were a bit hungry so we stopped on the way to work and picked up a much higher quality breakfast to start our own workdays:

(Heh, heh. Just making sure Tom keeps getting those royalty checks from Ronald McDonald!)

Have a great weekend. Like it or not, I’ll have a few more things to say next week.

Cheers!

The Older Brother

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70 thoughts on “The Older Brother goes back to grade school

  1. Ulfric Douglas

    When I see photos (terrible photos in this case, but hey its 2014) of school food like this my brain just shouts “Where’s the FOOD?”, ‘cos there isn’t any. No food. Nothing but sugar and crap. Thanks for the writeup, I think “Grandparents” day is a great idea and should be monthly.

    Reply
  2. Bryan Harris

    What is the whole raw milk thing? I remember they were trying to add legislation which would put small farmers out of business, did they get away with that?

    Reply
  3. j

    Yo dawg..I heard you like milk..so we put some milk in your milk so you can milk while youre milking.
    (Sorry if no one gets that reference)

    All I saw on that tray was sugar sugar and sugar. Also, it’s getting harder to find any dairy products without carrageennan in it..which is a shame when one is looking for some heavy whipping cream.

    Reply
  4. Linda

    Hi Older Brother,

    Another week or so of your offerings is always welcome! Not that I don’t follow Tom every day when he’s at the helm. Your items about grandparents’ day reminded me of when my granddaughter was in first grade. (I raised her since she lost both parents at age 6 months.)

    I don’t know the occasion, but I went to one with parents invited and we got to eat lunch with the kids. I was appalled and grateful that I had started packing my granddaughter’s lunch in kindergarten. The offerings on this special day were something like: pizza, mac and cheese, biscuits or corn muffins, chocolate cake, bananas, and some canned veggie like corn. I, too was saying, “where’s the food???” I home-schooled my granddaughter from second grade on, for a lot of reasons.

    Today, I happened to drive by that school, just two blocks from our house, and what, to my wondering eyes should appear? Not reindeer, folks! A giant poster affixed to the school fence saying that they were proudly part of our county’s “Clean up [My Plate]” program. The poster had a giant picture of “my plate” on it! I nearly ran off the road.

    All I can say is I’m thankful I’m not raising a child in school now! They would certainly confiscate her lunches now, because, even before I became aware of LCHF, I fed this child real food, little or no sugar, and low carbs. Her lunches contained things like slices of roast chicken from the night before, carrot sticks, cherry tomatoes from my garden, cheese sticks, and some berries. She grew up extremely healthy and now at age 22, is still the specimen of health, who cannot stand sugary food or very many starchy carbs. As the saying goes, “give me a child when young….” It truly saddens me to see what is being done to this generation in school

    Thanks for all your work, along with Tom!

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      Bless you for taking on the task of raising a grandchild. The Wife was quizzing ours on the way to school — “What’s your favorite lunch?”
      “Spaghetti! They had it yesterday but I missed it.”
      “How come?”
      “I had cold lunch.”
      “What’s cold lunch?”
      “Dad makes me a sandwich. That’s what I usually have.”

      When Tom and I were kids, “cold lunch” was just “lunch.” We had hot lunch once in awhile — that’s when we walked the four blocks home for lunch period. But those were in the unenlightened days where if people had children, it was assumed that they could also be depended upon to feed them. (sigh)

      The Older Brother

      Reply
  5. Linda

    PS: One of the things I like about McDonald’s is if I skip breakfast, I can go through there on the way to the grocery and get an order of scrambled eggs and sausage in a container and some of their excellent coffee! I don’t eat much else from there, though.

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      Yeah, I like their breakfast sausage, but they kind of lost me at Pink Slime.

      The Older Brother

      Reply
      1. Bret

        I think both the media and the public blew the pink slime thing way out of proportion. It seems to me that pink slime is merely a dysphemism for tendons, cartilage, and sinew, which add at least some unique nutrients compared to muscle meat and fat.

        Of course, the media’s and public’s reaction was unsurprising, given that most people have no appreciation for the value of nose-to-tail eating.

        It’s not without down sides, of course. That same Wikipedia link describes an unappetizing sterilization process of heating and chemical treatment. But on the other hand, I figure that such processing is par for the course in the entire chain of the industrial food system, from the “farm” it originates at all the way to the “restaurant” it is served in.

        Reply
      2. Elle

        McDonalds hasn’t used pink slime for three years now.

        But you can still find pink slime in school lunches.

        Reply
  6. Ed

    I have come up with a new hypothesis. Government is the major cause of high blood pressure. That can be taken to mean various things….all correct.

    Reply
  7. mlantenac

    Hell, the symptoms on that hypoglycemia poster, I think it was being in school that caused all those symptoms in me….

    Reply
  8. Ulfric Douglas

    When I see photos (terrible photos in this case, but hey its 2014) of school food like this my brain just shouts “Where’s the FOOD?”, ‘cos there isn’t any. No food. Nothing but sugar and crap. Thanks for the writeup, I think “Grandparents” day is a great idea and should be monthly.

    Reply
    1. Walter Bushell

      In the Modest Proposal Category.

      Crap would probably be a nutritional improvement. It’s a fermented food after all with lots of vitamin B12, protein and other nutrients. Think of the money local governments could save.

      It’s the dog’s breakfast!

      Reply
  9. Bryan Harris

    What is the whole raw milk thing? I remember they were trying to add legislation which would put small farmers out of business, did they get away with that?

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother Post author

      Got embarrassed last year when people got wind of it before they could sneak the business-killing regs in. So, as I predicted, the laid low for a little over a year before taking another bite at the apple. The bureaucrats get paid to do it, and eventually, they’ll either wear the victims down into submission or catch them when they aren’t paying attention. After all, any time small producers spend attending meetings and fighting the good fight is expensive time away from their occupation. This round is currently in process with a comment period ending mid-October.

      The Older Brother

      Reply
      1. Bret

        Wouldn’t it also be nice if we had a media willing to fulfill its purpose, part of which is to hold government accountable? That might spare some of those small-cap entrepreneurs the time and money of constantly showing up and fighting at these town hall meetings.

        But the FCC and state-level versions of it guarantee that media sources show the blob its due respect. So incorporated journalists spend most of their time decrying corporations and calling for a watered-down, euphemistic version of communism. I weep for the future, where the same gatekeeping will be imposed on blogs and other internet outlets.

        That necessarily brings fairly steady criticism of Republicans (loathsome, crony-capitalist politicians, no doubt), but none of the Democrats, except for the occasional[ly covered] scandal. Sigh.

        Reply
        1. The Older Brother Post author

          journalism sold its soul decades ago, when there was a paradigm shift from the ideal of objective reporting to advocating for “the good.”

          Much like school is now about indoctrinating children with the “correct” attitudes instead of teaching computational, composition, and reasoning skills.

          Cheers

          Reply
          1. Bret

            They’ve also got quite the noticeable chubby for our current commie savior in chief.

            Their only complaint about him is that he doesn’t go far enough.

            Reply
  10. Pat

    In the first food picture, what is between the juice boxes (sugar) and the bananas (sugar)?

    What a lot of sugar!

    Reply
    1. B35

      It contributes to greater IQ, self awareness, consideration of what they buy at supermarkets, and using common sense. All horrible, horrible things.

      Reply
  11. j

    Yo dawg..I heard you like milk..so we put some milk in your milk so you can milk while youre milking.
    (Sorry if no one gets that reference)

    All I saw on that tray was sugar sugar and sugar. Also, it’s getting harder to find any dairy products without carrageennan in it..which is a shame when one is looking for some heavy whipping cream.

    Reply
  12. Linda

    Hi Older Brother,

    Another week or so of your offerings is always welcome! Not that I don’t follow Tom every day when he’s at the helm. Your items about grandparents’ day reminded me of when my granddaughter was in first grade. (I raised her since she lost both parents at age 6 months.)

    I don’t know the occasion, but I went to one with parents invited and we got to eat lunch with the kids. I was appalled and grateful that I had started packing my granddaughter’s lunch in kindergarten. The offerings on this special day were something like: pizza, mac and cheese, biscuits or corn muffins, chocolate cake, bananas, and some canned veggie like corn. I, too was saying, “where’s the food???” I home-schooled my granddaughter from second grade on, for a lot of reasons.

    Today, I happened to drive by that school, just two blocks from our house, and what, to my wondering eyes should appear? Not reindeer, folks! A giant poster affixed to the school fence saying that they were proudly part of our county’s “Clean up [My Plate]” program. The poster had a giant picture of “my plate” on it! I nearly ran off the road.

    All I can say is I’m thankful I’m not raising a child in school now! They would certainly confiscate her lunches now, because, even before I became aware of LCHF, I fed this child real food, little or no sugar, and low carbs. Her lunches contained things like slices of roast chicken from the night before, carrot sticks, cherry tomatoes from my garden, cheese sticks, and some berries. She grew up extremely healthy and now at age 22, is still the specimen of health, who cannot stand sugary food or very many starchy carbs. As the saying goes, “give me a child when young….” It truly saddens me to see what is being done to this generation in school

    Thanks for all your work, along with Tom!

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother Post author

      Bless you for taking on the task of raising a grandchild. The Wife was quizzing ours on the way to school — “What’s your favorite lunch?”
      “Spaghetti! They had it yesterday but I missed it.”
      “How come?”
      “I had cold lunch.”
      “What’s cold lunch?”
      “Dad makes me a sandwich. That’s what I usually have.”

      When Tom and I were kids, “cold lunch” was just “lunch.” We had hot lunch once in awhile — that’s when we walked the four blocks home for lunch period. But those were in the unenlightened days where if people had children, it was assumed that they could also be depended upon to feed them. (sigh)

      The Older Brother

      Reply
  13. Linda

    PS: One of the things I like about McDonald’s is if I skip breakfast, I can go through there on the way to the grocery and get an order of scrambled eggs and sausage in a container and some of their excellent coffee! I don’t eat much else from there, though.

    Reply
      1. Bret

        I think both the media and the public blew the pink slime thing way out of proportion. It seems to me that pink slime is merely a dysphemism for tendons, cartilage, and sinew, which add at least some unique nutrients compared to muscle meat and fat.

        Of course, the media’s and public’s reaction was unsurprising, given that most people have no appreciation for the value of nose-to-tail eating.

        It’s not without down sides, of course. That same Wikipedia link describes an unappetizing sterilization process of heating and chemical treatment. But on the other hand, I figure that such processing is par for the course in the entire chain of the industrial food system, from the “farm” it originates at all the way to the “restaurant” it is served in.

        Reply
        1. The Older Brother Post author

          The questions re: the pink slime controversy are much more about honesty and integrity more than nutrition.

          The process uses ammonium hydroxide as to sterilize the meat in question as it is more prone to contamination, which is then ostensibly removed. According to some reports, “the USDA employee responsible for approving LFTB [the industry term for the product] was Undersecretary Jo Ann Smith. Smith, after leaving public service, reportedly made about $1.2 million over 17 years serving on the board of directors of IBP Inc., which became Tyson Fresh Meats, and which has, for years, been one of BPI’s principal suppliers of preprocessed meat.”

          Safety, “ewwww” factor, and conflicts of interest aside, if I go to McDonald’s and order a hamburger, I should be safe to assume it’s made of hamburger, not a USDA-approved, laboratory-created lookalike. McD’s, Burger King, etc. get this — that’s why they all dropped it right before it hit the public’s consciousness. Naturally, the government required school lunch programs to keep ordering it.

          The Older Brother

          Reply
          1. Bret

            The only disagreement I have with your remarks above is that I don’t see the pink slime as a “lookalike” ingredient. I see it as just a different part of the cow added in. It’s treated in an unpleasant way, as you said, but again, I see the chemical treatment stuff all across the board — pink slime being but one such area among many.

            In any case, it is amusing to hear that the USDA kept ordering it for lunches. That detail of course did not make it into the news reports, to return to our earlier topic of discussion, where the intended focus was, evidently, on how those evil, god awful corporations used to put pink slime into people’s food. The fact that wise, benevolent, supreme Government is still doing it seems to have slipped those journalists’ minds, if it was ever noticed in the first place.

            Reply
        1. The Older Brother Post author

          Yep, because McDonalds has to pay attention to what its customers want. Kids and schools aren’t the USDA’s customers — politicians and the food suppliers are.

          The Older Brother

          Reply
        2. The Older Brother Post author

          Yep, because McDonalds has to pay attention to what its customers want. Kids and schools aren’t the USDA’s customers — politicians and the food suppliers are.

          The Older Brother

          Reply
  14. Ed

    I have come up with a new hypothesis. Government is the major cause of high blood pressure. That can be taken to mean various things….all correct.

    Reply
  15. mlantenac

    Hell, the symptoms on that hypoglycemia poster, I think it was being in school that caused all those symptoms in me….

    Reply
  16. Kristin

    For the record I love that movie. It was one of my father’s favorites and since he was a conservative Republican and I a hippie liberal it was something we could enjoy together.

    I’m finding myself recoiling at the food your progeny found to be the best they could do. Sigh. At this point I’m arguing that we should not be trying to take our kids from a chicken nuggets and fries diet to a salad bar. Heck, I didn’t even eat much veg when I was a kid and I had those proper sit down meals with meat, starch and vegetable (green beans please.) If we could just get back to full fat milk and meat and maybe a starch with plenty of butter it would be light years away from what these poor kids endure. Fruit would be fine at that point since they would not be otherwise eating an all sugar all time meal.

    Soooo, what is between the fruit juice boxes and the bananas? Looks like gerbils to me. Probably not gerbils since that would be too healthy.

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      Depending on which part of the plate, it would be either banana peel or oatmeal you’re looking at. It is amazing what passes for foods these days. Seems the idea of a carton of milk that says “Ingredients: milk” is outside the realm of possibilities.

      The Older Brother

      Reply
    1. B35

      It contributes to greater IQ, self awareness, consideration of what they buy at supermarkets, and using common sense. All horrible, horrible things.

      Reply
      1. The Older Brother Post author

        Exactly. Next thing you know, they’ll be thinking they can decide what’s best for themselves, and then what would happen to the economy if all of the $100k a year bureaucrats lost their jobs?

        Sounds like I’m joking, but when our current as yet unindicted governor announced they were gong to fire the last 50 or so patronage hacks his Dept of Transportation hired (ignoring the previous 200 they hired, then quickly moved into civil-service protected slots), the big argument against wasn’t that these turds provided actual value to taxpayers; it was that laying off that many people would hurt the local economy.

        The Older Brother

        Reply
  17. Kristin

    For the record I love that movie. It was one of my father’s favorites and since he was a conservative Republican and I a hippie liberal it was something we could enjoy together.

    I’m finding myself recoiling at the food your progeny found to be the best they could do. Sigh. At this point I’m arguing that we should not be trying to take our kids from a chicken nuggets and fries diet to a salad bar. Heck, I didn’t even eat much veg when I was a kid and I had those proper sit down meals with meat, starch and vegetable (green beans please.) If we could just get back to full fat milk and meat and maybe a starch with plenty of butter it would be light years away from what these poor kids endure. Fruit would be fine at that point since they would not be otherwise eating an all sugar all time meal.

    Soooo, what is between the fruit juice boxes and the bananas? Looks like gerbils to me. Probably not gerbils since that would be too healthy.

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother Post author

      Depending on which part of the plate, it would be either banana peel or oatmeal you’re looking at. It is amazing what passes for foods these days. Seems the idea of a carton of milk that says “Ingredients: milk” is outside the realm of possibilities.

      The Older Brother

      Reply
  18. B35

    I remember at the school that I am in they have little bags of apples that say on the back that natural sugar increases your metabolism. Obviously since it was written on the back of a bag of apples it is therefore true. Way to go USDA.

    Reply
  19. B35

    I remember at the school that I am in they have little bags of apples that say on the back that natural sugar increases your metabolism. Obviously since it was written on the back of a bag of apples it is therefore true. Way to go USDA.

    Reply
  20. Amy L.H.

    I’m late to this party, but wanted to chime in, please.

    I’m saddened by the school breakfast offerings, but probably even more sad that kids are eating breakfast at school, rather than at home…that’s another story for another day, I suppose. Kids in before-care from 6:30 am to 8:20 am, then after-care from 3:00 pm-6:00 pm – talk about a captive audience. I feel terrible for kids in that situation, despite being able to recognize that some people find it necessary to work such long hours and depend on the school for this service. It’s still sad, to be away from your parents or caregivers for so long.

    Breakfast time in my house is almost a non-event on school mornings. Dinner, every night, consists of grilled or slow-cooked venison or chicken, some kind of buttered green veggie, potatoes or rice, or buttered bread. Sometimes they’ll have fruit or a yogurt afterwards for dessert. My kids don’t wake up hungry, and it was driving me nuts that they wouldn’t eat breakfast.

    So, I decided I would wait and see when they started to get hungry, and it was usually around 10 or 11 am. Seemed like dinner was holding them over long enough. Breakfast is more of a habit than a need, I think, for my children. Lunch is a sammie with cheese and some meat, veggies and fruit, homemade whole milk yogurt with some honey or fruit preserves, and maybe a cookie if it’s a special day. It doesn’t seem like a lot of food, but it’s all homemade, wholesome, and filling.

    I am not a carb-demonizer, especially for children* who seem to thrive on them – but quality counts. Bananas and grapes? Big yes. Sugary skim milk, cereal, or donuts? Heck NO a thousand times. Take those bananas and serve them with some full-fat yogurt or scrambled eggs and you’ve got a breakfast. Everything else is just junk, not food.

    *special populations who require therapeutic dietary interventions excepted.

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      Never too late.

      You hit the nail on the head. The real underlying problem isn’t that schools — because of budgetary and regulatory constraints — serve terrible food to kids. The real underlying problem is that the schools are full of kids whose parents believe it’s the school’s job to feed their kids. This is where you immediately break ranks with the majority of the population.

      Like all government programs, it started with lunches for “the poor,” then expanded to subsidizing school lunches generally, then after-school programs, then breakfasts, after-school programs, and now in some places, dinner, too.

      After all, if you’re going to set up a system where over half of all kids are born directly onto the Medicaid rolls — meaning the mother has made a declaration that she can’t afford to have kids — then that system is going to end up having to feed and babysit them. And as that system’s main function is now taking money from people who earned it and passing it out to people who didn’t, it has infinite demands on its resources. So, its decisions are going to be balanced between political pressure and cost, not parents’ wishes and quality. Period. It doesn’t matter to “The Blob,” as long as they can keep them healthy enough to make it to the voting booth.

      Cheers

      Reply
  21. Amy L.H.

    I’m late to this party, but wanted to chime in, please.

    I’m saddened by the school breakfast offerings, but probably even more sad that kids are eating breakfast at school, rather than at home…that’s another story for another day, I suppose. Kids in before-care from 6:30 am to 8:20 am, then after-care from 3:00 pm-6:00 pm – talk about a captive audience. I feel terrible for kids in that situation, despite being able to recognize that some people find it necessary to work such long hours and depend on the school for this service. It’s still sad, to be away from your parents or caregivers for so long.

    Breakfast time in my house is almost a non-event on school mornings. Dinner, every night, consists of grilled or slow-cooked venison or chicken, some kind of buttered green veggie, potatoes or rice, or buttered bread. Sometimes they’ll have fruit or a yogurt afterwards for dessert. My kids don’t wake up hungry, and it was driving me nuts that they wouldn’t eat breakfast.

    So, I decided I would wait and see when they started to get hungry, and it was usually around 10 or 11 am. Seemed like dinner was holding them over long enough. Breakfast is more of a habit than a need, I think, for my children. Lunch is a sammie with cheese and some meat, veggies and fruit, homemade whole milk yogurt with some honey or fruit preserves, and maybe a cookie if it’s a special day. It doesn’t seem like a lot of food, but it’s all homemade, wholesome, and filling.

    I am not a carb-demonizer, especially for children* who seem to thrive on them – but quality counts. Bananas and grapes? Big yes. Sugary skim milk, cereal, or donuts? Heck NO a thousand times. Take those bananas and serve them with some full-fat yogurt or scrambled eggs and you’ve got a breakfast. Everything else is just junk, not food.

    *special populations who require therapeutic dietary interventions excepted.

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother Post author

      Never too late.

      You hit the nail on the head. The real underlying problem isn’t that schools — because of budgetary and regulatory constraints — serve terrible food to kids. The real underlying problem is that the schools are full of kids whose parents believe it’s the school’s job to feed their kids. This is where you immediately break ranks with the majority of the population.

      Like all government programs, it started with lunches for “the poor,” then expanded to subsidizing school lunches generally, then after-school programs, then breakfasts, after-school programs, and now in some places, dinner, too.

      After all, if you’re going to set up a system where over half of all kids are born directly onto the Medicaid rolls — meaning the mother has made a declaration that she can’t afford to have kids — then that system is going to end up having to feed and babysit them. And as that system’s main function is now taking money from people who earned it and passing it out to people who didn’t, it has infinite demands on its resources. So, its decisions are going to be balanced between political pressure and cost, not parents’ wishes and quality. Period. It doesn’t matter to “The Blob,” as long as they can keep them healthy enough to make it to the voting booth.

      Cheers

      Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      No, Virginia. I’m sorry, but there is no Santa Claus. My bet is that these are either districts that already had money, or they are being funded with grants that won’t continue past the first or second year of “look how great we can feed these kids” photo ops.By then, they will have turned into programs run by bureaucrats.

      The Older Brother

      Reply
    1. The Older Brother Post author

      No, Virginia. I’m sorry, but there is no Santa Claus. My bet is that these are either districts that already had money, or they are being funded with grants that won’t continue past the first or second year of “look how great we can feed these kids” photo ops.By then, they will have turned into programs run by bureaucrats.

      The Older Brother

      Reply
  22. Jim

    About the most nutritious thing they could give kids is some regular ol’ whole milk. Now it has to be skim, but because that is unpalatable, they add chocolate and sugar! Crazy!

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      Not going to do that. It goes against the official jihad against fat.

      The Older Brother

      Reply
  23. Jim

    About the most nutritious thing they could give kids is some regular ol’ whole milk. Now it has to be skim, but because that is unpalatable, they add chocolate and sugar! Crazy!

    Reply

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