51 thoughts on “Fat Head Kids’ Club: Sugar and Concentration

  1. Laurie

    Ba ha ha! This is the best one yet, girls! Great explanations of blood sugar regulation & very entertaining! Keep them coming; they’re Grrrrrreat! 😉

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  2. Lisa

    Thanks for that! I am a third grade teacher, and I have decided that I am going to start next year focusing on nutrition with the students (be damned Common Core!). I am definitely going to show your Fat Head Kids’ Club videos, and find a way to take 27 children into our school garden so they can see where food comes from. I’ll make sure I have Time magazine and National Geographic by my side, should any parents decide to challenge my curriculum 🙂 I really enjoy your site Tom.

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  3. Cate

    Absolutely the best yet. So hilarious I laughed out loud (LOL for the kids.) You girls are getting your ACTING! on. (pls translate Jon Lovitz)

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  4. Khyleen Schwarzenberger

    Thank you….great job, a perfect way to get the message across! I am not so sure that most adults don’t need to see this….especially parents! Look forward to seeing more and I plan to share your “Fat Heads Kids Club” with my 26 grandchildren and their parents!

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  5. NM

    The previous editions were cute and amusing. But this episode doesn’t need any sort of patronising or “very good, considering they’re kids..” condescension. They perform their material magnificently: their timing, comprehension of the subject and interaction are top notch. They seem to have found their feet as consummate performers. I hope there are more episodes to come, because my daughter will soon be old enough to want to understand why we don’t let her have “juice” at her nursery-school. And your daughters may be just the team to explain it.

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  6. Dave

    Do their school teachers know about this? I mean, this is excellent stuff and the kind of thing that educators (used to?) make as assignments for science classes. I can imagine them using this video in a science fair, perhaps with some self experimental data based on easily measured hard data like blood sugar and blood pressure along with some more subjective data like puzzle solving times during the periods under test. Of course, that might mean actually eating sugar-coated corn flakes and orange juice just to show what kind of effect these supposedly good breakfast foods have on children.

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      1. Debbie

        Interesting that their teachers don’t follow your blog. I look up the parents of my students-Google and Facebook. Sometimes I learn some very interesting things about them. 😉

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  7. Tim Moore

    Excellent job on the video, Tom and kids. Should be required viewing in schools. (Like that will ever happen in the current climate!)

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  8. Ed

    Fantastic! I did have to watch it twice though. The first time I was laughing too hard to actually get most of the message.

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  9. Bernardo

    Hey congratulations!! Specially compared to the first one this one is amazing! Very funny and informative, much more well finished too! Really good and profession! Well done girls, mom and dad!

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  10. Martha

    These are great! I had my kids watch and they loved them. We are new to this and could use some help in making lunches without bread. How about a video with suggestions for packing lunches?

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  11. MsJake

    I need to show this to my kids (and maybe my husband!) so they really understand why Mom won’t let them have cereal for breakfast anymore!
    I think they get the whole “sugar is bad for you” message I am trying to get through to them, but maybe not the why.

    Great video Alana and Sara!

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    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      I think it’s good for people who don’t have a weight problem to understand that sugar and flour can affect their mood and ability to concentrate. This isn’t all just about body composition by any means.

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  12. Amberly

    My 4 kids loved this … even the 2 year old! We watched it before bed several times and the first thing they wanted to do the next morning was watch all the episodes over again.

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  13. Linda

    Absolutely great! Your girls are terrific! I have just forwarded it on to a friend of mine, obviously adult. He slogged through some reading I sent and the light bulb didn’t go off. This is to the point and I think he’ll get it this time around! Thank you girls and Tom!

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  14. June K

    My sister taught 3rd grade for over 30 years. Every year at Christmas dinner we got caught up with the most ‘interesting’ students she had that year. Lets see: Bouncing off the wall, check. Falling asleep before lunch, check. Kids getting ‘hangry’ in the afternoon, oh yes. I’m sure most teachers would love it if kids came to school after eating a breakfast of bacon and eggs instead of a big bowl of sugar whammies.

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  15. Jill

    Best and easiest-to-understand explanation of what high-sugar does to you and your system I’ve ever seen!! Talk about mood disorder!

    Thanks be to you and you kids! 🙂

    Not so funny to think that because of lousy breakfasts/lunches many kids are put on Ritalin and similar drugs to deal with “misbehaviour”. 🙁

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    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Yup. Feed kids a lousy breakfast, note lousy behavior afterwards, put them on drugs. Quite a racket.

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  16. B35

    Today was the day, we learned about nutrition. A dietitian from Cal-Poly came to our school to show a PowerPoint on what we should eat. She confirmed that we were supposed to have 300grams of carbage and denounced saturated fat as unhealthy. I myself, wanting to keep my A, did ask two questions. The first one was that since carbs turn to sugar in your digestive tract, and since sugar raises blood sugar, I asked that if we eat 300grams of carbs, then aren’t we ingesting more sugar? The response was that carbs were our main energy source and that it turns to fat when we don’t use the energy. In short, she dodged the question.

    Also, I asked what made saturated fat so bad, after all she gave little view on the subject. The dietitian replied that saturated fat clogged up arteries, which desperately made me want to point out that current false dietary science says it is cholesterol that clogs arteries up. In short, she made a slip-up of a slip-up.

    The dietitian said that carbs were our main source of energy and that we need to not sat much saturated fat. I bet she thought that I was one of those freaky paleo guys who hates the USDA guidelines. The dietitian is right, I am.

    It wasn’t all doom and gloom even though she probably convinced 50 kids into going along with the USDA guidelines and limiting saturated fat to 20grams per day. One of my friends who sat next to me I explained why carbs were not good and told him to check out this website.

    So thanks Mr.Naughton for keeping me from going along with the government diet agenda and I hope that soon these low-fat diet guidelines will be thrown on the junk pile of history.

    End of rant.

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