296 thoughts on “Victory!

  1. CeeBee

    I’m pleased to see this, but there is still much to be done. We just got back from a vacation that included time with my husband’s cousin, a charming man in his early 80’s. He was telling us that he is taking the largest dose of Lipitor that is recommended in order to keep his cholesterol down. His doctor wants his LDL cholesterol to be 75. He’s been able to keep it at 75 for a couple of years now. While we were visiting he was telling us about how little energy he has, how he spends most of his days in his easy chair, and that he sleeps much later now than he ever used to. He’s convinced that the Lipitor is helping him stay alive, I’m convinced that his cholesterol levels are dangerously low for a person of his age and that the Lipitor is actually a factor in his decreased energy level.

    Reply
    1. Justin B

      That’s one of the big issues though, isn’t it? People who are overweight or have a disease are so scared to change anything, because they’re afraid that they may die or make it worse if they do. A large portion probably believe that it would be worse if they weren’t doing what they’re doing, whether it be pills, low fat, etc.

      Reply
    2. Walter Bushell

      And his mental acuity. That level of cholesterol is dangerous for anybody. IIUC total mortality is lowest around 220, but its a very broad minimum. Below 170 you start being more likely to die by violence, perhaps by being annoying to those around you.

      Most people don’t know that some people are prescribed cholesterol. Few because if you can’t make enough cholesterol, you’re unlikely to be born even.

      From Dr. Gravline site quoting Malignant Medical Myths by Joel M. Kauffman

      This is an excellent confirmation that high total cholesterol and LDL-C ( low density lipoprotein cholesterol ) levels are beneficial, certainly in the elderly who are most likely to be prescribed a statin drug. The emphasis on the value of lowering LDL-C, rather than lowering total cholesterol, taken by Big Pharma in the last few years, is invalidated by this study. LDL-C is not bad cholesterol; it is an essential form!

      Reply
  2. Nate

    Jeez, I’m late for the party! The article is better than I expected. He quoted many LCHF experts, which tickled my ego as I almost know them, well, maybe not know them but I’ve read their names many times. Anyway, another treat was that he slammed refined carbs almost as much as he vindicated fats.

    I agree with Tom that we’ve won our first battle. However, I must say that Dr. Oz was the first skirmish that we won. He was a vocal vegetarian with the backing of a very wealthy and vocal supporter. Oprah. Then, out of the blue, he had Gary Taubes on his show. Even though Oz gave him a hard time, Oz must have listened and read his book. Because soon after Taubes was on his show, several other LCHF experts were featured.

    Reply
  3. B35

    I just realized that this magazine may be the reason they are pushing so many kids to be brainwashed into the low-fat diet. They know they are running out of options because of the new studies that are coming out and more scientists agreeing with us. They are trying to preserve the low-fat diet of doom.

    Long Live Fatheads!!!

    Reply
  4. CeeBee

    I’m pleased to see this, but there is still much to be done. We just got back from a vacation that included time with my husband’s cousin, a charming man in his early 80’s. He was telling us that he is taking the largest dose of Lipitor that is recommended in order to keep his cholesterol down. His doctor wants his LDL cholesterol to be 75. He’s been able to keep it at 75 for a couple of years now. While we were visiting he was telling us about how little energy he has, how he spends most of his days in his easy chair, and that he sleeps much later now than he ever used to. He’s convinced that the Lipitor is helping him stay alive, I’m convinced that his cholesterol levels are dangerously low for a person of his age and that the Lipitor is actually a factor in his decreased energy level.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Yup, it will take awhile for the Lipid Hypothesis to die. It’s merely been wounded.

      Reply
    2. Justin B

      That’s one of the big issues though, isn’t it? People who are overweight or have a disease are so scared to change anything, because they’re afraid that they may die or make it worse if they do. A large portion probably believe that it would be worse if they weren’t doing what they’re doing, whether it be pills, low fat, etc.

      Reply
    3. Walter Bushell

      And his mental acuity. That level of cholesterol is dangerous for anybody. IIUC total mortality is lowest around 220, but its a very broad minimum. Below 170 you start being more likely to die by violence, perhaps by being annoying to those around you.

      Most people don’t know that some people are prescribed cholesterol. Few because if you can’t make enough cholesterol, you’re unlikely to be born even.

      From Dr. Gravline site quoting Malignant Medical Myths by Joel M. Kauffman

      This is an excellent confirmation that high total cholesterol and LDL-C ( low density lipoprotein cholesterol ) levels are beneficial, certainly in the elderly who are most likely to be prescribed a statin drug. The emphasis on the value of lowering LDL-C, rather than lowering total cholesterol, taken by Big Pharma in the last few years, is invalidated by this study. LDL-C is not bad cholesterol; it is an essential form!

      Reply
  5. ruth

    Is anybody else surprised at how fast this change is happening? Of course it’s early days yet, but still.

    I had thought that fat-phobia would last for another decade or two, but I can see that the dominoes have started to fall now. When this story makes the cover of Time magazine, it indicates to me that the message that “saturated fat is good” has entered the mainstream and will stay in the mainstream.

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      Fast is how these things happen. It’s a “paradigm shift.” It’s a rapid, fundamental shift in what the average person considers as an “oh, everybody knows that” fact of life.

      It can only happen suddenly — once the little boy exclaimed that the emperor wasn’t wearing any cloths, people didn’t gradually come to the same conclusion over a period of months or years.

      It’s rapid because there is no real understanding of what the actual facts are. Joy Bauer is just as ignorant of science now that she’s saying “fat is ok” as she was last week when she was pimping for hearthealthywholegrains and decrying arterycloggingsaturatedfats.

      This was as every bit as certain to happen, and to happen in this way, as it was impossible to accurately predict WHEN it was going to happen. I assumed it was due well inside of 10 years because we can’t afford another decade’s worth of diabetes, IBS, dementia, etc. etc. but there was no way to know it would’ve happened last week instead of 3 or 4 years from now.

      This is where the “global warming as settled science,” the welfare state (Social Security, Medicare, government pensions) and the American dollar are headed. Inevitable, but with no date certain. Wheeeeeee!

      Cheers

      Reply
      1. Bret

        Your optimism on those latter issues is inspiring, Jerry. I don’t see how we as a nation are going to solve Medicare and Social Security in a constructive or intelligent way. I chat with seniors about this issue each week (online, but still counts, right?), and they seem resolute to keep screaming ‘we paid in, so we earned it!’ while keeping a white-knuckled grip on their benefits at the polls. And in voter turnout they always seem to kick every other demographic’s ass.

        Unless we are blessed with some sensible politicians in the next 10 years (I suppose lady luck owes us one or two, given the last 13 1/2 years), I am afraid our spoiled, pampered, arrogant ‘leaders’ will continue to procrastinate this problem, while pretending there is no problem, until push comes to shove, and they are forced under threat of default to compromise with a combination of lower benefits and higher taxes.

        Reply
  6. ruth

    Is anybody else surprised at how fast this change is happening? Of course it’s early days yet, but still.

    I had thought that fat-phobia would last for another decade or two, but I can see that the dominoes have started to fall now. When this story makes the cover of Time magazine, it indicates to me that the message that “saturated fat is good” has entered the mainstream and will stay in the mainstream.

    Reply
    1. The Older Brother

      Fast is how these things happen. It’s a “paradigm shift.” It’s a rapid, fundamental shift in what the average person considers as an “oh, everybody knows that” fact of life.

      It can only happen suddenly — once the little boy exclaimed that the emperor wasn’t wearing any cloths, people didn’t gradually come to the same conclusion over a period of months or years.

      It’s rapid because there is no real understanding of what the actual facts are. Joy Bauer is just as ignorant of science now that she’s saying “fat is ok” as she was last week when she was pimping for hearthealthywholegrains and decrying arterycloggingsaturatedfats.

      This was as every bit as certain to happen, and to happen in this way, as it was impossible to accurately predict WHEN it was going to happen. I assumed it was due well inside of 10 years because we can’t afford another decade’s worth of diabetes, IBS, dementia, etc. etc. but there was no way to know it would’ve happened last week instead of 3 or 4 years from now.

      This is where the “global warming as settled science,” the welfare state (Social Security, Medicare, government pensions) and the American dollar are headed. Inevitable, but with no date certain. Wheeeeeee!

      Cheers

      Reply
      1. Bret

        Your optimism on those latter issues is inspiring, Jerry. I don’t see how we as a nation are going to solve Medicare and Social Security in a constructive or intelligent way. I chat with seniors about this issue each week (online, but still counts, right?), and they seem resolute to keep screaming ‘we paid in, so we earned it!’ while keeping a white-knuckled grip on their benefits at the polls. And in voter turnout they always seem to kick every other demographic’s ass.

        Unless we are blessed with some sensible politicians in the next 10 years (I suppose lady luck owes us one or two, given the last 13 1/2 years), I am afraid our spoiled, pampered, arrogant ‘leaders’ will continue to procrastinate this problem, while pretending there is no problem, until push comes to shove, and they are forced under threat of default to compromise with a combination of lower benefits and higher taxes.

        Reply
  7. Jeff

    The interesting thing to watch now will be if the federal government will admit they were wrong by flipping the so-called food pyramid upside-down.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton

      Sure, that’ll happen. Just give it 15 or 20 years. In the meantime, they’ll continue imposing low-fat diets on kids in schools.

      Reply
      1. Bret

        I agree with that prediction, Tom. I’ve been treated to military dining facilities recently, and there is not one single shred of butter in sight. Everything that would serve such a purpose is in fact vegetable oil spread, and they have bins of melted margarine for waffles/pancakes. Gross, gross, gross.

        Also, by the recurring bowel complaints I experience and hear almost everyone else experiencing (sorry for the TMI), I am about 99.6% sure that all the meat, vegetables, potatoes, etc are cooked in soybean oil or some other nasty, chemically processed vegetable oil.

        Reply
  8. Jeff

    The interesting thing to watch now will be if the federal government will admit they were wrong by flipping the so-called food pyramid upside-down.

    Reply
    1. Tom Naughton Post author

      Sure, that’ll happen. Just give it 15 or 20 years. In the meantime, they’ll continue imposing low-fat diets on kids in schools.

      Reply
      1. Bret

        I agree with that prediction, Tom. I’ve been treated to military dining facilities recently, and there is not one single shred of butter in sight. Everything that would serve such a purpose is in fact vegetable oil spread, and they have bins of melted margarine for waffles/pancakes. Gross, gross, gross.

        Also, by the recurring bowel complaints I experience and hear almost everyone else experiencing (sorry for the TMI), I am about 99.6% sure that all the meat, vegetables, potatoes, etc are cooked in soybean oil or some other nasty, chemically processed vegetable oil.

        Reply
        1. Walter Bushell

          Don’t worry about the TMI, a lot of us have been taking up resistant starch and are playing the bas trombone.

          Reply
          1. Bret

            Funny you should mention that, Walter. Because I started my potato starch fairly soon after I started eating chow hall food exclusively. I can’t quite tell which is causing the bloating, gas, etc, if not both together.

            It’s subsiding now, gratefully. So either I have adjusted to the extreme excess of omega-6 or the RS. Or both. 🙂

            Reply
  9. Willa Jean Dooley

    Did you hear her say, “butter is no longer the enemy”?
    I guess butter learned it’s lesson and switched sides,, huh?

    Reply
  10. Willa Jean Dooley

    Did you hear her say, “butter is no longer the enemy”?
    I guess butter learned it’s lesson and switched sides,, huh?

    Reply

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