Guest Host On ‘The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show’

I’m the guest host for today’s edition of The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show With Jimmy Moore.  (Jimmy has been taking time off to finish his next book.)

The topic, which was suggested by Jimmy, is Feeding Kids For Health.  Since feeding our girls is mostly Chareva’s responsibility, I brought her into the episode, followed by the girls themselves.  I think you’ll enjoy their insights on how to get kids to eat vegetables.

You can download and/or listen to the episode here.

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76 thoughts on “Guest Host On ‘The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show’

  1. Clint

    Didn’t want to apear like fanatics? I love that, I need to tone it down, I tend to be out spoken.
    Your daughter is so right, vegetables vs nothing, mothers don’t give in, my niece always gives in, children really know how to manipulate, I sure did.
    I also like that you let your daughters enjoy the birthday parties they go to, I rarely go out to eat, but when I do, it’s with family (parents, brother, and nieces) and altho I would like to just no worry about it and cheat since 95% of the time eat paleo/primal, in front of my family, I feel I need to set an example, so I am very selective at restaurants.
    Thank you Tom for a GREAT podcast!!

    Thanks for listening.

    Reply
  2. Rocky Angelucci

    Awesome podcast! Your daughters are wonderful.

    I played sections of it for my seven year old daughter. Even though most of our family and friends have improved their diets, most of her school peers have not, making her stand out a bit at lunchtime. I think she was reassured hearing other kids her age talking about appreciating a better diet while sometimes feeling different around their peers.

    As an aside, my daughter took the book I wrote (Don’t Die Early) to school a while back and her teacher borrowed it off of my daughter’s desk during recess. The teacher contacted me some weeks later and said that she had purchased her own copy of the book and it had compelled her to change her diet. “The less wheat I eat, the better I feel,” she wrote in her email.

    At least that’s one teacher who won’t be shoving grains at the students nor confiscating their whole-fat yogurt.

    One at a time adds up.

    Reply
  3. Jillian

    Totally enjoyed your family interview. Kudos to y’ll for getting such a great jump start on a healthy life for your girls.

    Reply
  4. MITBeta

    Great show, cute kids (“I break the cookie in half…”). I suffered from “tonsil stones” throughout my 20s but never could find any specific cause. I, too, have not had one in years.

    I’m inspired to start cutting more refined carbs from my kids’ diet. I’ve been almost gluten free for about 1.5 years and recently got very serious about eliminating other carbs, like rice, potato, etc. from my own diet. I’ve seen the results on the scale and in other ways. I’ve always scratched my head about the dilemma of serving my kids something that I find to be unhealthy for myself. Some meals, however, find my youngest eaters passing up the meat and veggies on their plates (cooked in butter, or coconut oil, no less) in favor of plain. white. rice. (sigh).

    I guess there simply comes a time to stop serving rice and let them eat veggies and meat or go hungry, no?

    Sure, but rice wouldn’t be on my hit-list for kids, unless they’re going crazy on the stuff and ignoring the other items on their plates. I feel the same about white potatoes for kids: if they’re not already fat or showing signs of metabolic damage, I don’t believe potatoes as part of a meal will hurt them. I don’t eat them, but that’s because they give me glucose spikes.

    Reply
  5. Denise

    I thoroughly enjoyed this charming interview with your family. Your girls are very smart and well able to express themselves, but I loved it the most when they dissolved into giggles. What a happy sound!

    They’re happy kids and giggle a lot. I love that sound.

    Reply
  6. Clint

    Didn’t want to apear like fanatics? I love that, I need to tone it down, I tend to be out spoken.
    Your daughter is so right, vegetables vs nothing, mothers don’t give in, my niece always gives in, children really know how to manipulate, I sure did.
    I also like that you let your daughters enjoy the birthday parties they go to, I rarely go out to eat, but when I do, it’s with family (parents, brother, and nieces) and altho I would like to just no worry about it and cheat since 95% of the time eat paleo/primal, in front of my family, I feel I need to set an example, so I am very selective at restaurants.
    Thank you Tom for a GREAT podcast!!

    Thanks for listening.

    Reply
  7. labrat

    Interesting interview with one of the SDHS investigators came out on Medscape today.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/780949?src=wnl_edit_specol&uac=77126EK

    plus they have a bunch of articles on the latest Med diet study.

    This is fun: Pritikin advocate defends lo-fat against the latest Med diet study.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/780941

    The links take me to pages that ask for a password, but I have no doubt the Pritikin advocates are denying the evidence.

    Reply
  8. MITBeta

    Great show, cute kids (“I break the cookie in half…”). I suffered from “tonsil stones” throughout my 20s but never could find any specific cause. I, too, have not had one in years.

    I’m inspired to start cutting more refined carbs from my kids’ diet. I’ve been almost gluten free for about 1.5 years and recently got very serious about eliminating other carbs, like rice, potato, etc. from my own diet. I’ve seen the results on the scale and in other ways. I’ve always scratched my head about the dilemma of serving my kids something that I find to be unhealthy for myself. Some meals, however, find my youngest eaters passing up the meat and veggies on their plates (cooked in butter, or coconut oil, no less) in favor of plain. white. rice. (sigh).

    I guess there simply comes a time to stop serving rice and let them eat veggies and meat or go hungry, no?

    Sure, but rice wouldn’t be on my hit-list for kids, unless they’re going crazy on the stuff and ignoring the other items on their plates. I feel the same about white potatoes for kids: if they’re not already fat or showing signs of metabolic damage, I don’t believe potatoes as part of a meal will hurt them. I don’t eat them, but that’s because they give me glucose spikes.

    Reply
  9. Trish

    Your daughters made me giggle madly, particularly when they chastised their mother for having a heavy hand with the sour cream in the spinach. Alana’s sarcastic “as long as you don’t overdo the sour cream, MOM” literally made me snort with laughter. If they’re this awesome at nine and almost eight, they’ll be women to be reckoned with. Thank you for letting us listen to your very awesome family. Oh, yeah–and you’re totally boxing outside your weight with Chareva. 😉

    I thought the same when I started dating Chareva, but she married me anyway. The girls are already a force to be reckoned with.

    Reply
  10. labrat

    Interesting interview with one of the SDHS investigators came out on Medscape today.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/780949?src=wnl_edit_specol&uac=77126EK

    plus they have a bunch of articles on the latest Med diet study.

    This is fun: Pritikin advocate defends lo-fat against the latest Med diet study.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/780941

    The links take me to pages that ask for a password, but I have no doubt the Pritikin advocates are denying the evidence.

    Reply
  11. Trish

    Your daughters made me giggle madly, particularly when they chastised their mother for having a heavy hand with the sour cream in the spinach. Alana’s sarcastic “as long as you don’t overdo the sour cream, MOM” literally made me snort with laughter. If they’re this awesome at nine and almost eight, they’ll be women to be reckoned with. Thank you for letting us listen to your very awesome family. Oh, yeah–and you’re totally boxing outside your weight with Chareva. 😉

    I thought the same when I started dating Chareva, but she married me anyway. The girls are already a force to be reckoned with.

    Reply
  12. labrat

    Tom, Medscape requires registration – but it’s free. The interview with Dr. Ramsden is a quite enlightening. He’s a rarity in my book. A fairly honest researcher. My favorite quote from the article.

    For a little perspective, if you eat a diet from foods that are raised naturally — it doesn’t matter if it is predominantly vegetable-based or meat-based — as everybody would have done up until about 100 years ago, you are going to consume something like 2%-3% of calories from linoleic acid. So with that perspective, the burden of proof would seem to be on the group advocating changes from what you would get in a natural diet, rather than vice versa.

    Reply
  13. labrat

    Tom, Medscape requires registration – but it’s free. The interview with Dr. Ramsden is a quite enlightening. He’s a rarity in my book. A fairly honest researcher. My favorite quote from the article.

    For a little perspective, if you eat a diet from foods that are raised naturally — it doesn’t matter if it is predominantly vegetable-based or meat-based — as everybody would have done up until about 100 years ago, you are going to consume something like 2%-3% of calories from linoleic acid. So with that perspective, the burden of proof would seem to be on the group advocating changes from what you would get in a natural diet, rather than vice versa.

    Reply
  14. Dave

    Listening to you and your family, I couldn’t help thinking about a documentary of a raw vegan family that I saw a few years ago. How very lucky your girls are to be raised by parents who don’t equate animal foods and cooking with ‘junk food’!!

    If animals are junk food, I guess our paleo ancestors were junk-food addicts.

    Reply
  15. Dave

    Listening to you and your family, I couldn’t help thinking about a documentary of a raw vegan family that I saw a few years ago. How very lucky your girls are to be raised by parents who don’t equate animal foods and cooking with ‘junk food’!!

    If animals are junk food, I guess our paleo ancestors were junk-food addicts.

    Reply
  16. George Wilson

    I have often wondered (happily) why our boys don’t have the same weight problems as my wife and I. It finally occurred to me that the root was my wife making baby food from scratch. Real food, not processed. Later we were the opposite of our parents who went by the ‘clean plate’ doctrine. “Eat, don’t eat”, was our philosophy. They never went hungry, they just didn’t eat to be eating

    I think it’s silly to order kids to eat everything on their plates — unless they try to get away with skipping dinner and then filling up later on junk.

    Reply
  17. George Wilson

    I have often wondered (happily) why our boys don’t have the same weight problems as my wife and I. It finally occurred to me that the root was my wife making baby food from scratch. Real food, not processed. Later we were the opposite of our parents who went by the ‘clean plate’ doctrine. “Eat, don’t eat”, was our philosophy. They never went hungry, they just didn’t eat to be eating

    I think it’s silly to order kids to eat everything on their plates — unless they try to get away with skipping dinner and then filling up later on junk.

    Reply
  18. Rae F.

    You know I used to have the throat crud too. But, I never attributed it to eating bread before this. Makes sense. Also glad to know that I wasn’t the only one.

    Reply
  19. Rae F.

    You know I used to have the throat crud too. But, I never attributed it to eating bread before this. Makes sense. Also glad to know that I wasn’t the only one.

    Reply
  20. Lynda

    Hello Tom and Chareva

    My husband and I listened to your podcast last night while travelling away in the car. I loved it! My children are grown but I have two grandsons and luckily they are not being bought up like I was – my blood sugar is like yours, I’m fine as long as I stay away from potatoes etc.

    What I really enjoyed was you relaxed attitude about your eating. There are so many “paleo police” out there who say if you’re not doing this or that then you are not right. For me it is about a total lifestyle and we have been wheat free now for 18 months. I’ve commented here before about how watching Fathead was the “lightbulb” moment for us but it too “Wheat Belly” to make it click even more.

    Your family is delightful and it was lovely to hear your lovely wife. Thank you again for changing my life, for that is what you did.

    Thank you, Lynda. I agree with Mark Sisson (and others) that the key is to do it right most of the time. We don’t want the girls to feel as if they’re living in dietary straightjackets and rebel as soon as they leave home.

    Reply
  21. Lynda

    Hello Tom and Chareva

    My husband and I listened to your podcast last night while travelling away in the car. I loved it! My children are grown but I have two grandsons and luckily they are not being bought up like I was – my blood sugar is like yours, I’m fine as long as I stay away from potatoes etc.

    What I really enjoyed was you relaxed attitude about your eating. There are so many “paleo police” out there who say if you’re not doing this or that then you are not right. For me it is about a total lifestyle and we have been wheat free now for 18 months. I’ve commented here before about how watching Fathead was the “lightbulb” moment for us but it too “Wheat Belly” to make it click even more.

    Your family is delightful and it was lovely to hear your lovely wife. Thank you again for changing my life, for that is what you did.

    Thank you, Lynda. I agree with Mark Sisson (and others) that the key is to do it right most of the time. We don’t want the girls to feel as if they’re living in dietary straightjackets and rebel as soon as they leave home.

    Reply

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