Chareva’s Kitchen: Spinach Your Kids Will Eat

The first time we made this spinach dish, the girls snapped up their portions and then were outraged to learn they couldn’t have seconds — it was all gone.  So now we make it with two boxes of spinach.

Ingredients:

  • 2 ten-ounce boxes of frozen spinach
  • 4 TB (half a stick) of butter
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • Salt to taste

Steps:

Microwave the spinach for 10 minutes, then press out most of the liquid.


Put drained spinach in a dish and stir in the butter, then stir in the parmesan so it melts.

Stir in the remaining ingredients.

Adjust the spices to taste.  Sometimes I use a little garlic salt in place of some of the garlic powder, but you can always add salt later.  I also like extra nutmeg now and then.

Enjoy.

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82 thoughts on “Chareva’s Kitchen: Spinach Your Kids Will Eat

  1. Amy Dungan

    I will personally vouch that this recipe is amazing. It’s the only way my hubby and kids will eat spinach as a side dish. Thanks again Tom!

    If I remember correctly, you told me later you’d never seen your son take seconds on spinach before.

    Reply
  2. Angel

    Hey Ron – there’s nothing to be envious about – some people are just a lot more sensitive to the bitter compounds in veggies than others. I think most veggies taste bitter too. I go weeks on end without touching any, and I’m doing just fine. Eat some liver a few times a month, and nutritionally you’ll be doing just as well, if not better, than the people eating loads of rabbit food. 🙂

    Having said that … I’ve heard that home grown veggies raised in rich soil without artificial chemicals usually aren’t as bitter as store-bought conventionally produced ones (fresh or canned). My personal experience with that has been mixed, but it’s something to consider if you are trying to develop a taste for veggies.

    Reply
  3. Galina L.

    Another piece of food related news – Paula Dean comments on having been diagnosed with D2 a while ago. She told it was not her diet to blame because she eats everything in moderation. The media sources mentioned that there were a lot of cheese and butter in her unhealthy cooking (nobody noticed any sugar and flower, probably because it is as natural in the food as air).

    In our neighborhood it is normal to knock into your neighbor’s door if you suddenly run out of salt, for example. If I run out of fresh garlic, I am in trouble – NO ONE ever has it, even the lady who buys everything organic and natural, has just a little jar of organic chopped garlic. I use natural garlic mostly because it is how I cook, and I think if the recipe requires a dried garlic – so be it. It has a particular flavor, different from the fresh or cooked one. I keep both types in my pantry in use both but not interchangeably.

    When I saw that news, I checked her recipe site. Yes, lots of butter and cheese … also lots of sugar and flour.

    Reply
  4. Nickie

    That looks so good! I will try it when the kids get off their GF/CF diet.

    My version is simple: Spinach + a brick of cream cheese+ onion salt. Yours looks super yummy.

    Reply
  5. Monica

    Make this a little on the saucy side and toss with spaghetti squash. Add diced cooked chicken and a some bacon. Pour into a buttered casserole dish and top with a bit more cheese. Bake at 350 until cheese is melted and bubbly. This can be assembled ahead and refrigerated until needed. It’s an easy baked “pasta” dish with none of the bad stuff.

    Reply
  6. Marilyn

    Yes, Chareva. There’s the financial consideration for many. There’s also the reality that any possible tiny extension of one’s life due to any possible tiny improvement in food quality could well be offset by additional time in preparing the food, additional time needed to work to make the extra money to buy the better quality food. . . well, you get the picture. 🙂

    Reply
  7. Angel

    Hey Ron – there’s nothing to be envious about – some people are just a lot more sensitive to the bitter compounds in veggies than others. I think most veggies taste bitter too. I go weeks on end without touching any, and I’m doing just fine. Eat some liver a few times a month, and nutritionally you’ll be doing just as well, if not better, than the people eating loads of rabbit food. 🙂

    Having said that … I’ve heard that home grown veggies raised in rich soil without artificial chemicals usually aren’t as bitter as store-bought conventionally produced ones (fresh or canned). My personal experience with that has been mixed, but it’s something to consider if you are trying to develop a taste for veggies.

    Reply
  8. Galina L.

    Another piece of food related news – Paula Dean comments on having been diagnosed with D2 a while ago. She told it was not her diet to blame because she eats everything in moderation. The media sources mentioned that there were a lot of cheese and butter in her unhealthy cooking (nobody noticed any sugar and flower, probably because it is as natural in the food as air).

    In our neighborhood it is normal to knock into your neighbor’s door if you suddenly run out of salt, for example. If I run out of fresh garlic, I am in trouble – NO ONE ever has it, even the lady who buys everything organic and natural, has just a little jar of organic chopped garlic. I use natural garlic mostly because it is how I cook, and I think if the recipe requires a dried garlic – so be it. It has a particular flavor, different from the fresh or cooked one. I keep both types in my pantry in use both but not interchangeably.

    When I saw that news, I checked her recipe site. Yes, lots of butter and cheese … also lots of sugar and flour.

    Reply
  9. Nickie

    That looks so good! I will try it when the kids get off their GF/CF diet.

    My version is simple: Spinach + a brick of cream cheese+ onion salt. Yours looks super yummy.

    Reply
  10. Amy Dungan

    It was acutally John that had never asked for seconds. He just doesn’t like the stuff, but he’s always happy when I make this. Rachel loves it, which is also unusual. It used to just be Matt and I that like spinach.

    Tell John if he ends up as strong as Popeye, he owes me one.

    Reply
  11. Marilyn

    Yes, Chareva. There’s the financial consideration for many. There’s also the reality that any possible tiny extension of one’s life due to any possible tiny improvement in food quality could well be offset by additional time in preparing the food, additional time needed to work to make the extra money to buy the better quality food. . . well, you get the picture. 🙂

    Reply
  12. Amy Dungan

    It was acutally John that had never asked for seconds. He just doesn’t like the stuff, but he’s always happy when I make this. Rachel loves it, which is also unusual. It used to just be Matt and I that like spinach.

    Tell John if he ends up as strong as Popeye, he owes me one.

    Reply
  13. Sol y Sombra

    I am beginning to suspect you have a Bulgarian heritage – we have an almost identical recipe in Bulgarian cuisine, only we use feta cheese instead of parmesan and no cream. But those are certainly good ideas. And yes, this was a great way to trick us kids into eating spinach.

    One more thing – we didn’t have microwave ovens when I was a kid, so my mom always boiled the spinach first (and it was always fresh, never frozen, ah, those were the days), then she put it into a baking pan with the cheese and butter, baked it until almost ready and then cracked eggs on top and put red pepper and baked it a little more until the eggs were done. I still enjoy this dish, I have reintroduced it into my menu now, since it is fully primal.

    And I’d like to take the opportunity and thank you for your movie and for the wonderful information you post on your blog. Thanks, Tom!

    That sounds delicious.

    Reply
  14. Sol y Sombra

    I am beginning to suspect you have a Bulgarian heritage – we have an almost identical recipe in Bulgarian cuisine, only we use feta cheese instead of parmesan and no cream. But those are certainly good ideas. And yes, this was a great way to trick us kids into eating spinach.

    One more thing – we didn’t have microwave ovens when I was a kid, so my mom always boiled the spinach first (and it was always fresh, never frozen, ah, those were the days), then she put it into a baking pan with the cheese and butter, baked it until almost ready and then cracked eggs on top and put red pepper and baked it a little more until the eggs were done. I still enjoy this dish, I have reintroduced it into my menu now, since it is fully primal.

    And I’d like to take the opportunity and thank you for your movie and for the wonderful information you post on your blog. Thanks, Tom!

    That sounds delicious.

    Reply
  15. Sarah

    I’m trying this tonight, with fresh garlic because that’s what I have on hand. And I pinned it to Pinterest to spread the love.

    And can I just say I love how you all dress up for dinner. I will have to hunt down a tiara or two for my daughter and me and get my husband to put on a tie! 😀

    The girls do enjoy a good round of dress-up.

    Reply
  16. Sarah

    I’m trying this tonight, with fresh garlic because that’s what I have on hand. And I pinned it to Pinterest to spread the love.

    And can I just say I love how you all dress up for dinner. I will have to hunt down a tiara or two for my daughter and me and get my husband to put on a tie! 😀

    The girls do enjoy a good round of dress-up.

    Reply
  17. Mie

    So you got your kids to eat spinach – by adding plenty of butter and cream and cheese into it. Eh … you do realize that most people would eat bark, shoe soles or sponge if prepared with butter, cream and cheese, right? 🙂

    I don’t recommend the shoe soles. They’re too chewy.

    Reply
  18. Mie

    So you got your kids to eat spinach – by adding plenty of butter and cream and cheese into it. Eh … you do realize that most people would eat bark, shoe soles or sponge if prepared with butter, cream and cheese, right? 🙂

    I don’t recommend the shoe soles. They’re too chewy.

    Reply
  19. Kim C.

    Okay, made this two nights in a row and it was delicious. Thanks for posting the actual recipe. I had heard you talk about it on the Carbohydrates Can Kill podcast, but wasn’t sure of the ratios, so I just held off trying it.

    It was a big hit with my husband, but my 2 year old son wouldn’t even try it, as he is suspicious of all things green (except for baked kale chips – which make use of coconut oil/bacon grease and cheese). He only ate those after watching a friend’s toddler eat them. Gotta love peer pressure! I’m going to have to bring my friend’s kiddo over to eat this now, so my son will give it a try.

    Thanks again for the recipe, the movie, the blog, and the general awesomeness that you share with all of us!

    If someone comes up with red spinach, you’re in business.

    Reply
  20. Kim C.

    Okay, made this two nights in a row and it was delicious. Thanks for posting the actual recipe. I had heard you talk about it on the Carbohydrates Can Kill podcast, but wasn’t sure of the ratios, so I just held off trying it.

    It was a big hit with my husband, but my 2 year old son wouldn’t even try it, as he is suspicious of all things green (except for baked kale chips – which make use of coconut oil/bacon grease and cheese). He only ate those after watching a friend’s toddler eat them. Gotta love peer pressure! I’m going to have to bring my friend’s kiddo over to eat this now, so my son will give it a try.

    Thanks again for the recipe, the movie, the blog, and the general awesomeness that you share with all of us!

    If someone comes up with red spinach, you’re in business.

    Reply
  21. Diana

    I made this tonight and was skeptical as to whether we would like it, but it was a BIG hit. I didn’t even have fresh Parmesan!

    And they say kids don’t like vegetables. Sure they do, if you add the tasty fats.

    Reply
  22. Diana

    I made this tonight and was skeptical as to whether we would like it, but it was a BIG hit. I didn’t even have fresh Parmesan!

    And they say kids don’t like vegetables. Sure they do, if you add the tasty fats.

    Reply
  23. Emmalydia

    Just made this tonight! SOOOOO GOOD! I have never liked spinach because i always thought it looked like seaweed but even seaweed would taste good with butter and garlic! Yummy =) (to this recipe not seaweed lol)

    Reply
  24. Emmalydia

    Just made this tonight! SOOOOO GOOD! I have never liked spinach because i always thought it looked like seaweed but even seaweed would taste good with butter and garlic! Yummy =) (to this recipe not seaweed lol)

    Reply
  25. Lisa

    Thank you for posting this. I struggle to find easy to make dishes for a lowcarb diet, especially side dishes. I made this and it was easy and delicious. I’ve purchased a couple of paleo cookbooks but the dishes are always too complicated for me to make. I am a very simple cook and need simple dishes.

    Reply
  26. Lisa

    Thank you for posting this. I struggle to find easy to make dishes for a lowcarb diet, especially side dishes. I made this and it was easy and delicious. I’ve purchased a couple of paleo cookbooks but the dishes are always too complicated for me to make. I am a very simple cook and need simple dishes.

    Reply
  27. Bridgetta

    I made this a few years ago after watching Fathead and it is, hands down, my favorite way to eat spinach.

    Reply
  28. Trish B

    I’ve made this for several years now. Best way *ever* to eat spinach, I want to thank you for the recipe. We make a double batch and if there ever are any leftovers they are jealously guarded for someone’s lunch the next day.

    I’ve brought it to holiday gatherings, it gets plowed through (and is a nice alternative to the ubiquitous green bean casserole). A little shredded parmesan melted on top makes a nice presentation, and it reheats well, so you can make it ahead.

    Reply
  29. Trish B

    I’ve made this for several years now. Best way *ever* to eat spinach, I want to thank you for the recipe. We make a double batch and if there ever are any leftovers they are jealously guarded for someone’s lunch the next day.

    I’ve brought it to holiday gatherings, it gets plowed through (and is a nice alternative to the ubiquitous green bean casserole). A little shredded parmesan melted on top makes a nice presentation, and it reheats well, so you can make it ahead.

    Reply

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