Odds and Ends …

      111 Comments on Odds and Ends …

On the Carbohydrates Can Kill Show – first of four

In the previous few weeks, I recorded four Q & A sessions with Dr. Robert Su and some Fat Head fans for the Carbohydrates Can Kill podcast.   It was fun having a chance to actually talk with people I mostly know only from the comments section of the blog.

The first of those podcasts is now available on Dr. Su’s site.

Shipping DVDs again tomorrow

Well, ya’ll gave us a good problem to have:  we ran through our stock of Fat Head DVDs earlier this week.  When we moved to our temporary residence in an apartment after buying the mini-farm, we brought along what we thought was a sufficient supply of DVDs and put the rest in storage.

When we went to fill orders on Tuesday, we realized we’d emptied our last box in the apartment.  Chareva made arrangements with the PODS facility to bring a POD out of storage, and I met one of our movers there this morning to partially unload the POD and retrieve more DVDs.

Did I say partially?  It was closer to completely.  As Murphy’s Law would dictate, the boxes of DVDs were all the way at the front of the POD — I mean literally up against the front wall.  So we pretty much unloaded and reloaded the whole thing.

We’ll get caught up on all of this week’s orders tonight and tomorrow.  I appreciate the strong and ongoing support for the film from all of you, even if it occasionally means I get dust on my clothes from moving boxes and furniture.

Speaking of support, a reader spotted my complaints about our international distributor in the comments section and emailed to ask if buying more copies of the international Fat Head DVD would just be putting money in their pockets instead of mine.

Nope.  The Fat Head International DVD we sell on the blog is the one we produced ourselves – precisely because the international distributor hasn’t done diddly and is, if anything, preventing Fat Head from receiving wider distribution.  (I may write more about that later.)  When you order the DVD from the blog, you’re ordering it from me, not them.

Meanwhile, the U.S. distributor that first put Fat Head on Amazon and in some stores has filed for bankruptcy.  That’s why there’s no U.S.-only version anymore.  Unfortunately, they’re going bankrupt while owing us nearly two years’ worth of royalties.  Poof … gone.

If cereal boxes were truthful

My nephew Eric  (the one whose doctor wants him on statins despite high HDL and low triglycerides) alerted me to this picture of an artist’s rendition of cereal boxes.

I love it.  An online news article about the cereal boxes had this to say:

If you live in the Los Angeles area and happen to be perusing the cereal aisle at the Venice location of mega-supermarket Ralph’s, you may find yourself confused. Gawker reports the manufacturer’s boxes have been replaced with contemporary artist Ron English’s “propaganda.”

… His attack on the products isn’t falling on deaf ears. The Wall Street Journal reported that General Mills is vigorously attempting to reformulate its cereals to reduce the sugar content.

Great.  If they can find a way to remove the sugar and the grains entirely, they might have a decent product to sell.

However, reducing sugar poses certain challenges: “Not only do the cereal’s frosted oats need to taste sweet enough to keep kids clamoring, they have to float in milk for at least three minutes,” states the article.

The goal for parents shouldn’t be to have kids who clamor.  The goal should be to have kids who are healthy.  My girls had sausage and eggs this morning and enjoyed them.  It didn’t occur to us to see if those foods will float in milk.

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111 thoughts on “Odds and Ends …

  1. Nowhereman

    @ Dave and Tom

    I suspect one of the big factors, if what Dave is saying is true, is nitrates laden and smoked meats. Processed foods are still processed, even on a low-carb diet.

    Reply
  2. Nowhereman

    @ Nickie

    At what point did you get up and go explain to that guy why he was wrong about butter, eggs, and sausage? Maybe you should arrange for a special showing of “Fat Head” at a future Cub Scout meeting.

    Hear, hear!

    Reply
  3. Firebird

    @ John Doe, I am familiar with the book, thank you for bringing it up. I never needed to read it because I was a nutrasweet junkie and noticed some things it was doing to me, especially cognitive stuff. I can’t blame all of that on nutrasweet, but I can include it in the conversation. I don’t think the damage is reversible, either.

    To paraphrase Woody Allen in “Annie Hall”: I use to be an aspartame addict, now I’m a stevia addict.”

    Reply
  4. Firebird

    @ John Doe, I am familiar with the book, thank you for bringing it up. I never needed to read it because I was a nutrasweet junkie and noticed some things it was doing to me, especially cognitive stuff. I can’t blame all of that on nutrasweet, but I can include it in the conversation. I don’t think the damage is reversible, either.

    To paraphrase Woody Allen in “Annie Hall”: I use to be an aspartame addict, now I’m a stevia addict.”

    Reply
  5. Nickie

    Nowhereman, that’s a good idea! It was my first ever meeting and my son’s second. We just moved to this (rural) town a couple of months ago and don’t know many people yet. We are still trying to convert my family.

    Reply
  6. Charles-Andre Fortin

    Nice pictures! My girlfriend finally eliminate wheat completely at breakfast for her and her daughter. Instead now, they eat eggs with bacon/saussage (without wheat).

    That’s a big change for her because no so long ago, she almost only eat pasta, sandwich, etc.

    And also here a funny fact, since she eat a LCHF diet, she says that she never have so many vegetable in her frig even when she was a vegetarian!;)

    Reply
  7. Nickie

    Nowhereman, that’s a good idea! It was my first ever meeting and my son’s second. We just moved to this (rural) town a couple of months ago and don’t know many people yet. We are still trying to convert my family.

    Reply
  8. Steve

    — leave it to su to have listeners prepared with interesting questions… looking forward to the rest in the series.

    — lmao… TWO YEARS worth of royalties??? talk about restricted calories.

    I’m always impressed by how well-informed the readers are.

    Reply
  9. Underground

    Ok, my brain is full of… a word I won’t use here. I’ve been trying to go through the source studies used to propose the USDA dietary guidelines. What a load. Controls? We don’t need ’em. You get the answers you want when you only ask the same questions over and over again and taior those to your preconceptions.

    I think my favorite quote was how this USDA director (in fine bureaucratic fashion) answered the question without answering the question posed in this Scientific American article. I mean who cares ‘what’ you’re eating as long as you’re eating less of it right? Pfft.

    “Will the more recent thinking on fats and carbs be reflected in the 2010 federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans, updated once every five years? It depends on the strength of the evidence, explains Robert C. Post, deputy director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Findings that “have less support are put on the list of things to do with regard to more research.” Right now, Post explains, the agency’s main message to Americans is to limit overall calorie intake, irrespective of the source. “We’re finding that messages to consumers need to be short and simple and to the point,” he says. Another issue facing regulatory agencies, notes Harvard’s Stampfer, is that “the sugared beverage industry is lobbying very hard and trying to cast doubt on all these studies.”

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=carbs-against-cardio

    Reply
  10. Dave

    Subsidy Free Lifestyle should be your next book/movie Tom. If the USA subsidizes it, stop using/ingesting it.

    btw, anyone going as the guy from CSPI for Halloween?

    No, we want to scare the kids, not terrorize them.

    Reply
  11. gallier2

    What I find quite perplexing about the carb reintroducers like Jaminets or Dr.Kurt Harris. No, let me rephrase that, it’s not them that are perplexing, because their arguments are right and true, but the low-carbers that are surprised by it. Have they not read their litlerature correctly? The pioneers of low-carb eating, be they Dr.Atkins or Dr.Lutz all had no problem with reintroducing carbs after some time on low-carb. Maintenance phase (phase 4) on Atkins allowed as much starch as could be tolerated without weight gain, this meant around the quantity Dr. Paul Jaminet proposes. Dr.Lutz had even a section in his book were he explained why you should never go below 74 g/day. Even Dr.Eades does not recommend a ketogenic diet for long term.
    So the whole critic against Dr.Jaminet is uncalled for, his recommendation is perfectly aligned with low-carb.

    I believe we can re-introduce carbs up to our individual tolerance level. I also believe we don’t need to re-introduce them if we feel fine without them.

    Reply

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