The Long Knives Are Out For ‘Wheat Belly’

Look as if the grain-industry people have been trolling the internet attempting to trash Wheat Belly, the outstanding new book by Dr. William Davis.  How else do you explain an Amazon review written under the title The David Koresh of Medicine.   Notice that the review doesn’t dispute any of the facts or science presented in Wheat Belly:

The author has no credentials, no credibility, just a small cult of terriby misinformed followers. Don’t be fooled by the high volume screech against wheat and grains.

I have to admit, it didn’t occur to me when I recommended Wheat Belly that Dr. Davis has no credentials.  I assumed being a doctor who’s seen the benefits of a wheat-free diet in thousands of his own patients counted for something.  I also figured that after poring over hundreds of studies on wheat’s health effects and thoroughly researching the history and genetic structure of wheat, Dr. Davis was qualified to write on the topic.

Allegations of “secret ingredients in wheat” to make you eat more, or comparisons to cigerettes. Seriously?!

Apparently the wheat lobby doesn’t require its job applicants to pass a spelling test.  Are cigerettes similar to cigarettes?

Dr. Davis never claimed there are secret ingredients in wheat.  He didn’t (as far as I know) don a Ninja costume or disguise himself as a plumber and break into the headquarters of Wheat , Inc. to pilfer documents.  He simply described, based on published documents, how wheat has been modified during the past 50 years.

For over 8000 years wheat has sustained and grown human kind …

Eight-thousand years ago, humans (some of them, anyway) consumed Einkorn wheat.  The main similarity between Einkorn wheat and today’s mutant wheat is they’re both called “wheat.”  We also call both Thomas Jefferson and Adolph Hitler “humans,” but they produced rather different effects on other humans.  What we ate 8,000 years ago has nothing to with the health consequences of eating a highly modified variety of wheat that’s only been around for the past 50 years.

And wheat didn’t “grow”  humankind.  Wheat shrunk humankind.

… oh and it tastes good when mixed with a little water and yeast.

That explains why nearly every brand of bread includes high fructose corn syrup high on the list of ingredients.

Every nutritionist and serious medical professional will tell you that bread is the most economical and safe source of essential nutrients.

Every one, seriously?  That’s odd … I seem to recall a lot of conversations and interviews with nutritionists and medical professionals who agree wholeheartedly with Dr. Davis — who, despite having a good sense of humor, is a serious medical professional.  So serious that he wrote a book about wheat.

In fact, bread is handed out in natural disasters because it sustains life without food safety issues or requiring refrigeration.

Tell ya what:  if I’m ever starving because a tornado wiped out all the refrigerators within a 50-mile radius, I’ll eat some of the bread FEMA hands out.  But the fact that bread doesn’t require refrigeration doesn’t in any way prove it’s good for us.  Coca-Cola and heroin don’t require refrigeration either.

And now, suddenly it will kill you. Comical!

No, today’s mutant wheat doesn’t kill you suddenly.  It’s more like slow torture.

This book is such a bone headed, misinformed way to just scare people into not eating.

Now wait a minute, Buster!  Dr. Davis is 100% in favor of people eating.  He just doesn’t want them eating a mutant grain product that will make them fat and sick.

As for secret ingredients, humm, apparently the author is ignorant of the food laws that regulate everything that goes into food and on food labels.  Unlike some enforcement agencies, the FDA has some serious teeth behind its enforcement.

Well, that certainly negates all the studies demonstrating the negative effects of wheat that Dr. Davis cited in Wheat Belly.  If the USDA and FDA are on the beat, mutant wheat (which is heavily subsidized by the same government that funds the USDA and FDA) simply has to be safe.  That’s why they conducted all those tests on the stuff to make sure it wouldn’t cause any … no, wait a minute.  Nobody ever conducted tests on mutant wheat to see if it’s fit for human consumption. Okay then, we’ll just have faith the USDA and FDA can tell if a food product is safe by looking at it.  That works for me.

As for frankenwheat, again seriously?! Wheat, due to its ubiquitous presence in the world is treated as sacrosant from any GMO research or development.

I see.  So when wheat went from being a wispy plant that couldn’t be harvested until it was five feet tall to a short, stubby little plant that’s harvested when it’s two feet tall — all in just the past 50 years —  that was a natural mutation, was it?  Boy, evolution works really, really quickly.  I wonder what all those plant geneticists on the Monsanto payroll are doing all day.  They’re probably just sitting around, playing poker and thinking, “Geez, I wish they’d let us develop some kind of hybridized new seeds that the company could patent and then force farmers to buy by threatening to sue them if some of those seeds blow onto their farms and start growing even if the farmers didn’t want the seeds in the first place.”

If you need real, science based information on healthy eating, check out […] and leave this book and its cult in the compound.

I’ll try to read […], but when I searched for […] on Amazon, all that came up was a kids’ book titled “Dot and Dash play Dot-Dot-Dot.”

I was hoping the grain lobby wouldn’t find out about our cult.  For those of you who haven’t been recruited yet, we have a secret handshake that requires a lot of flexibility in the fingers — that keeps out the grain-lobby infiltrators who are suffering from wheat-induced arthritis.  At our meetings, Dr. Davis sacrifices a goat and then we all spend hours enjoying ritual dancing around a bonfire on our pain-free legs.  Sometimes we even dance naked.  It’s not a sexual thing, you understand … we just like showing off our rash-free skins.

I’m sure this campaign by the grain industry will succeed.  Any day now, Dr. Davis will have a conversation with a patient something like this:

“So how do feel after being wheat-free for the past two months?”

“Well, Dr. Davis, I lost 25 pounds, my psoriasis cleared up, my arthritis went away, I’m sleeping better, I’m not depressed anymore, I think more clearly, and I stopped wheezing.”

“Excellent!  So you’ll continue avoiding wheat?”

“Of course not.”

“But—“

“Wheat has been sustaining humans for 8,000 years, Dr. Davis, so it has to be good for us.  Besides, I don’t want to end up spending all day the airport banging on a tambourine and selling flowers to passengers.”

“But I never asked you to– why are you sticking your fingers in your ears?”

“What?”

“I said, WHY ARE YOU STICKING YOUR FINGERS IN YOUR EARS?”

“My de-programmers told me not to listen to you.”

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192 thoughts on “The Long Knives Are Out For ‘Wheat Belly’

  1. Ron K.

    This is just another case of ” If you can not attack the facts, attack the person”. Ridicule is a weak attempt to stop serious discussion of a topic and the person using it usually has no intention of debating the issue.

    Of course. Ad hominem attacks and appeals to authority are two good indicators that the debater can’t make a case with actual facts.

    Reply
  2. Peggy Cihocki

    I’m hopeful that, since it’s making all kinds of best seller lists, people actually ARE reading it and not listening to grain lobby trolls. I like Dr. Davis’ credentials just fine!

    Reply
  3. Mat

    Wasn’t David Korech the leader of a crazy cult (who thought he was the messiah) in Waco TX who ended up being stormed by the FBI?

    Or is that David Koresh I’m thinking of – Both appear to be / have been total ‘wheat-jobs’ (I refuse to call them nut-jobs as nuts are a pretty sensible food whereas wheat is a stupid ‘food’)

    Reply
  4. bec

    I’ve never heard of David Korech. I bet he’s a horrible murdering bastard.

    So was David Koresh, apparently.

    Karma at work: if I make fun of some troll’s spelling, you can bet I’ll make a typo or two in the same post.

    Reply
  5. inga

    If ever you’re starving because a tornado wiped out all the fridges you should really reach for the bacon and eggs. Both will survive a goodly time without refridgeration and an added bonus is the eggs can even be boiled in contaminated water without any side affects, or so I hear… try this one at your own risk. And of course, yours are crappy american eggs so they likely come to you contaminated anyway 😉

    PS: my spelling is crap too, I could work for the wheat lobby 😀

    By this time next year, we plan to be eating eggs from our own chickens.

    Reply
  6. Helen

    “As for frankenwheat, again seriously?! Wheat, due to its ubiquitous presence in the world is treated as sacrosant from any GMO research or development.”

    quote from member only article diggers.com.au
    Nine trials of GM wheat are currently being planted across five states and territories, with the Australian Government predicting it will have GM bread on supermarket shelves by 2015. As the head of a global NGO that campaigns on food security around the world, I am here to support Greenpeace Australia’s efforts to stop control of this crucial food staple from falling into the hands of transnational GM food companies.

    Oxfam reported in 2011 that a handful of manufacturers, producers and retailers already control 70 per cent of decisions made in the global food system.[1] The world’s top four seed companies – Monsanto, Dupont, Syngenta and Bayer – now control over half of the world’s seed sales. These are also the GM companies pushing for control of Australian wheat.
    As a native of South Africa, and someone who has seen first-hand starvation in Africa I am often asked how it is that I can be opposed to GM. This questioning assumes that GM leads to healthier, sustainable and more abundant crops – but this is far from the truth.

    In fact, GM has the potential to increase hunger around the globe. This of course jars with most people’s logic (and defies brilliant marketing campaigns by the GM industry) that the companies responsible for producing food globally could actually cause further food scarcity. It angers me that corporate scientists and global GM companies can still get away with making the bogus claim that their seeds will feed the poor, when in fact their only goal is greater profits.

    This is not just the opinion of Greenpeace. Last Monday, eight prominent international scientists wrote an open letter to the CSIRO questioning the ethics of GM wheat trials being run in conjunction with the French biotech company, Limagrain.

    Reply
  7. Helen

    So glad i don’t eat wheat any more. I just need to convince my family. Of course if I was starving I would eat it too as living unwell is preferable to dying.. I think.

    Reply
  8. Bex

    Even the Whole9ers are not enjoying Wheat Belly. That surprises me a little. I’ve ordered my copy, and the postman is late…..probably having trouble getting up the stairs after a breakfast of toast, no doubt!
    My experience of eating a tiny amount of wheat after nearly 4 weeks of abstention was a massive sugar crash. A day or two later, when I ate something sugary (meringue, the perfect wheat free cake), I had no such symptoms. Hmm….

    My experience with a tiny amount of wheat is a tiny return of arthritis.

    Reply
  9. Ron K.

    This is just another case of ” If you can not attack the facts, attack the person”. Ridicule is a weak attempt to stop serious discussion of a topic and the person using it usually has no intention of debating the issue.

    Of course. Ad hominem attacks and appeals to authority are two good indicators that the debater can’t make a case with actual facts.

    Reply
  10. Peggy Cihocki

    I’m hopeful that, since it’s making all kinds of best seller lists, people actually ARE reading it and not listening to grain lobby trolls. I like Dr. Davis’ credentials just fine!

    Reply
  11. Mat

    Wasn’t David Korech the leader of a crazy cult (who thought he was the messiah) in Waco TX who ended up being stormed by the FBI?

    Or is that David Koresh I’m thinking of – Both appear to be / have been total ‘wheat-jobs’ (I refuse to call them nut-jobs as nuts are a pretty sensible food whereas wheat is a stupid ‘food’)

    Reply
  12. eddie watts

    no surprise though was it?
    the response that is. and also the lack of anything to back their assertions other than “because we say so”

    Reply
  13. bec

    I’ve never heard of David Korech. I bet he’s a horrible murdering bastard.

    So was David Koresh, apparently.

    Karma at work: if I make fun of some troll’s spelling, you can bet I’ll make a typo or two in the same post.

    Reply
  14. inga

    If ever you’re starving because a tornado wiped out all the fridges you should really reach for the bacon and eggs. Both will survive a goodly time without refridgeration and an added bonus is the eggs can even be boiled in contaminated water without any side affects, or so I hear… try this one at your own risk. And of course, yours are crappy american eggs so they likely come to you contaminated anyway 😉

    PS: my spelling is crap too, I could work for the wheat lobby 😀

    By this time next year, we plan to be eating eggs from our own chickens.

    Reply
  15. Alexandra

    I buy plenty of books from Amazon but I’ve never posted a review, guess it’s time to start…

    Give it a whirl.

    Reply
  16. Helen

    “As for frankenwheat, again seriously?! Wheat, due to its ubiquitous presence in the world is treated as sacrosant from any GMO research or development.”

    quote from member only article diggers.com.au
    Nine trials of GM wheat are currently being planted across five states and territories, with the Australian Government predicting it will have GM bread on supermarket shelves by 2015. As the head of a global NGO that campaigns on food security around the world, I am here to support Greenpeace Australia’s efforts to stop control of this crucial food staple from falling into the hands of transnational GM food companies.

    Oxfam reported in 2011 that a handful of manufacturers, producers and retailers already control 70 per cent of decisions made in the global food system.[1] The world’s top four seed companies – Monsanto, Dupont, Syngenta and Bayer – now control over half of the world’s seed sales. These are also the GM companies pushing for control of Australian wheat.
    As a native of South Africa, and someone who has seen first-hand starvation in Africa I am often asked how it is that I can be opposed to GM. This questioning assumes that GM leads to healthier, sustainable and more abundant crops – but this is far from the truth.

    In fact, GM has the potential to increase hunger around the globe. This of course jars with most people’s logic (and defies brilliant marketing campaigns by the GM industry) that the companies responsible for producing food globally could actually cause further food scarcity. It angers me that corporate scientists and global GM companies can still get away with making the bogus claim that their seeds will feed the poor, when in fact their only goal is greater profits.

    This is not just the opinion of Greenpeace. Last Monday, eight prominent international scientists wrote an open letter to the CSIRO questioning the ethics of GM wheat trials being run in conjunction with the French biotech company, Limagrain.

    Reply
  17. Helen

    So glad i don’t eat wheat any more. I just need to convince my family. Of course if I was starving I would eat it too as living unwell is preferable to dying.. I think.

    Reply
  18. Bex

    Even the Whole9ers are not enjoying Wheat Belly. That surprises me a little. I’ve ordered my copy, and the postman is late…..probably having trouble getting up the stairs after a breakfast of toast, no doubt!
    My experience of eating a tiny amount of wheat after nearly 4 weeks of abstention was a massive sugar crash. A day or two later, when I ate something sugary (meringue, the perfect wheat free cake), I had no such symptoms. Hmm….

    My experience with a tiny amount of wheat is a tiny return of arthritis.

    Reply
  19. Onkel Kostja

    “… oh and it tastes good when mixed with a little water and yeast.”

    If you mix wheat, water and yeast, the result will probably taste yeast. Personally I don’t think yeast tastes good.

    I have to admit to enjoying the taste of Elmer’s glue as a child. I’m guessing the taste of wheat, water and yeast is similar.

    Reply
  20. Bill Davis

    The review you mentioned must have been removed as of Oct 1, 2011. I wanted to read it for myself and nada!

    Thanks though for a critical review of the critical review. Someone else must have thought it didn’t hold any nutritional value and pulled it from the shelves. FDA? USDA? Who knows?

    I just checked and it’s still there, unless I’m looking at a cached page.

    Reply
  21. Georgene Harkness

    “At our meetings, Dr. Davis sacrifices a goat and then we all spend hours enjoying ritual dancing around a bonfire on our pain-free legs. Sometimes we even dance naked.”

    Well, heck. Now I’m not sure whether I’m really looking forward to, or really dreading, the next LC Cruise. I guess it all depends on who’s doing the naked dancing. Maybe I won’t sit on the front row this time 🙂

    As always, Tom, you have me laughing out loud!

    Perhaps we can vote on who gets to dance naked.

    Reply
  22. Laurie-Avalanche

    Tom,
    As usual you have tackled the topic with great humour and levity but proving the point of the wheat lobby being utterly ridiculous in their claims against Dr. Davis and his bestselling book. I was literally “LOL”. Dang though…. I’d better dust off my tambourine! 😉

    I was talking about this very “cult” like subject with my mom this morning and she relented her previous claim that I am a zealot about low carbing. I told her if I can help the “Ted’s” of the world (a diabetic co-worker I’m presently coaching on low carbing… who’s doing awesome btw), then call me a zealot! It’s about getting healthy, helping people and improving quality of life. I think it’s my duty to “pay it forward” after regaining my own health.

    Thanks for starting my day with humour, my friend!
    Laurie

    Your friend is lucky you care and got involved.

    Reply
  23. Firebird

    Wait you ate glue? And here all I thought it was good for was sniffing. 🙂

    I sniffed the Elmer’s too, but it had little effect.

    Reply
  24. eddie watts

    no surprise though was it?
    the response that is. and also the lack of anything to back their assertions other than “because we say so”

    Reply
  25. Jason Helmes

    I stumbled on this blog due to a friend’s Facebook post. I watched the movie and read the testimonials. I decided to try it for myself.

    For years, the only way for me to be at a good weight was to run. A lot. Like 12-15 miles per week. If I didn’t do that, I was too flabby for my liking. And I felt hungry. All the time.

    I really didn’t get why I would eat a massive, mixing-bowl sized helping of Cheerios (presumably healthy) at around 8 and be starving/borderline shaking by 10. Shouldn’t that big, healthy meal keep me going? I’d head back for a granola bar to keep the blood sugar up.

    I’ve been LC, almost Paleo for 2 months. I’ve lost 14 pounds, almost all from my waist. I lift weights regularly. Have for years. And as I’ve lost 14 pounds, I’ve actually gotten around 15% STRONGER! Something that NEVER happened with my old diet. When I would lose my belly, I would lose some of my strength, even as I was religiously weight training.

    And the BEST change is my mental mindset. I’m a teacher, and under my old diet, at least 1-2 times per week, I would have a “foggy” day. My students would giggle as I would make math mistakes on the board. (Pre-Algebra. Fun times.) Well, this school year, I have had zero “foggy” days in a month. I thought I was just having a good streak for the first couple of weeks. Then, after some consideration, I realized that my wheat fog had lifted.

    I have a 1 year old girl at home. My in-laws look at me weird when they ask if they should feed my daughter a graham cracker or fruit and I say, “Neither. How about some ham and cheese?” I haven’t even tried to explain it to them. I just pretend I’m a bad father.

    Thanks so much for this blog, it has changed the way I view food, and my diet.

    I apologize for this not being immediately related to your post. I just wanted to share my story!

    I’m happy to hear your story, whichever post it appears under.

    Reply
  26. Alexandra

    I buy plenty of books from Amazon but I’ve never posted a review, guess it’s time to start…

    Give it a whirl.

    Reply
  27. Angel

    Tom, I bet the taste of Tinkertoys is probably closer to wheat, water and yeast than Elmer’s glue. I don’t remember eating glue, but I remember the taste of Tinkertoys. Initially woody with a little bit of a chemical taste from the paint, followed by a woodsy aftertaste. Mmmm.

    Tinkertoys are good if you serve them with the proper wine.

    Reply
  28. Bevie

    Be sure to have your marinade ready for when you sacrifice the goat. I recommend olive oil and lemon juice.

    We’ll give that a try at the next cult meeting.

    Reply
  29. Lisa

    @Bill Davis – Here’s the permalink to the comment:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R31C0R0YBG9ATA/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=1609611543&nodeID=&tag=&linkCode=

    I’m reading “Wheat Belly” now. I haven’t consumed wheat in many years and can only say that I am much better off for not eating it. 60 pounds lost, and rarely ill. Of course, I also follow a low carb/Paleo/primal lifestyle, but nothing effects me more adversely than wheat did when I tried it again after many months of abstinence. Wheat makes me bloated, swollen, and gassy, not to mention the BG crash.

    Reply
  30. David

    “My experience with a tiny amount of wheat is a tiny return of arthritis.”

    I hope you recognize the possibility of that being entirely psychosomatic. Wheat is supposedly killing us all, yet when I was a vegan I used to read such meaningless statements in regards to beef, eggs and milk. Thousands of vegans think they feel great eating tons of wheat, but when they realize a trace amount of milk was in their rye bread suddenly they’re arthritic, bloated and depressed.

    Stephan Guyenet – a real scientist, unlike you, with an interest in truth, not financial gain, unlike you – used to worry he had the same vague problems with wheat. So he conducted a controlled, blinded experiment on himself:

    http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2011/02/my-gluten-free-january.html

    What happened?

    “At the end of the month, I did a blinded wheat challenge using the method I described in a previous post, which uses gluten-free bread as the placebo (1). I recorded my blood sugar at 30 minute intervals after eating the bread, and recorded how I felt physically and emotionally for three days after each challenge.

    The result? I think the bread gave me gas, but that’s about it. I’m not even positive that was due to the wheat. My energy level was good, and I didn’t experience any digestive pain or changes in transit time. There was no significant difference in my blood glucose response between the bread and the gluten-free bread.”

    Until you conduct such an experiment on yourself, it is intellectual dishonesty to use you neurotic complaints as a case against wheat.

    Umm … what exactly is my financial interest in this debate? If somebody owes me a check, I’d like to know.

    It’s not psychosomatic, genius. I didn’t decide wheat would give me pains and then start experiencing them. I noticed, after repeated episodes, that eating wheat caused my arthritis to flare up — and that was when I still believed wheat was good food. But if you’d like to believe the hundreds of patients who reported to Dr. Davis that their arthritis went away after he advised them to give up wheat to manage diabetes — much to his surprise, as you’d know if you actually read the book before critiquing it — were all experiencing the same psychosomatic reaction, be my guest.

    Hey, I’m curious … do you believe the documented quadrupling of the rate of celiac disease in the past 50 years is caused by psychosomatic reactions?

    Reply
  31. Ellen

    Misinformation, it’s the classic tool of most organizations who don’t have a truly beneficial product to sell. Look at drug companies, they are masters at spinning bad data. The grain organizations must be taking lessons.

    Reply
  32. David

    And if people refuse to take Dr. Davis seriously, it isn’t because he has no credentials, it’s because he relies on pathetic science. I think Kurt Harris recently summed it up pretty well:

    “I believe Dr. Davis has diabetes, but I am not sure of which type. So if he looks a liitle metablolic that may be relevant

    This may also explain, but certainly does not excuse, his ridiculous and clinically unsupported hysteria about postprandial hyperglycemia.

    He has actually said that it is a reasonable goal to have ZERO elevation of blood glucose after every meal. Unless you are eating zero carb, this is rare if not physiologically impossible. There is absolutely nothing pathologic about mildly raised BG after a CHO rich meal. This is easily confirmed by spending 15 minutes on pubmed.

    He is scaring the shit out of people by having them monitor blood glucose levels and telling them levels in the 120s are glycating their proteins, etc.

    All this is simply the “fear of hyperinsulinemia of the CIH” squared.

    And I don’t know the current status of his diet recommendations, but a year or so ago he was recommending huge rancid PUFA from nuts in order to limit saturated fat from animals. Bass ackwards, IMO.

    Giant doses of fish oil for high trigs and treating any TSH above 1.5 as “hyperthyroid” in order to correct laboratory values that are “causing” ahterosclerosis is more pseudoscientific nonsense.

    I suppose I will be forced to read this book to see just how bad it is.

    But I suspect it will set back any real arguments against wheat substantially..

    I think drinking milk can make you overeat, but it helps no one to claim milk causes cancer like Loren Cordain still thinks.

    I believe that wheat flour can be minimized in the diet with nothing but beneficial effects, but I don’t get the acid argument.. Is he saying it leaches calcium? Phytic acid binding minerals yes, acid/base no.

    The pissing away your bones thing is nonsense, whether coming from the paleos or the vegans.”

    That was from the comments section on this CarbSanity post, which does a great job questioning Dr. Davis’ poor science:

    http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2011/09/wheat-belly-on-acid.html#comments

    I once questioned whether I was sensitive to wheat, so I eliminated it for a time. No improvements whatsoever, though I didn’t really have any problems to begin with. Eating wheat as part of my diet I maintain great energy, a good complexion and a lean physique. That’s all I need to know.

    Dr. Davis doesn’t offer the slightest shred of proper science. Just anecdotes from people who he convinced were sensitive to wheat after he improved their health with a low-carb, vegetable oil free, sugar free, junk-food free lifestyle that stresses exercise and numerous supplements.

    You can’t deny his faulty logic and scientific method. I don’t understand how a layman comedian can lefture people on “science for smart people’ and then willingly promote what any real scientist would consider to be bad science.

    Yet another review from someone who clearly hasn’t read the book, or even my review of the book. Wheat Belly does not rely strictly on anecdotes from his medical practice, although those are important. Dr. Davis cites scientific studies throughout.

    Reply
  33. Onkel Kostja

    “… oh and it tastes good when mixed with a little water and yeast.”

    If you mix wheat, water and yeast, the result will probably taste yeast. Personally I don’t think yeast tastes good.

    I have to admit to enjoying the taste of Elmer’s glue as a child. I’m guessing the taste of wheat, water and yeast is similar.

    Reply
  34. Bill Davis

    The review you mentioned must have been removed as of Oct 1, 2011. I wanted to read it for myself and nada!

    Thanks though for a critical review of the critical review. Someone else must have thought it didn’t hold any nutritional value and pulled it from the shelves. FDA? USDA? Who knows?

    I just checked and it’s still there, unless I’m looking at a cached page.

    Reply
  35. Georgene Harkness

    “At our meetings, Dr. Davis sacrifices a goat and then we all spend hours enjoying ritual dancing around a bonfire on our pain-free legs. Sometimes we even dance naked.”

    Well, heck. Now I’m not sure whether I’m really looking forward to, or really dreading, the next LC Cruise. I guess it all depends on who’s doing the naked dancing. Maybe I won’t sit on the front row this time 🙂

    As always, Tom, you have me laughing out loud!

    Perhaps we can vote on who gets to dance naked.

    Reply
  36. Don in Arkansas

    Even though ‘big wheat’ may be gunning for Dr. Davis it is significant to note that our of 70 reviews (as of this comment) 57 are 5 star and 8 are 4 star reviews. So, 65 out of 70 reviews are extremely positive. If I were an author, I would be very happy with those figures. Personally, no grains, no sugar works for me. To heck with the ‘bread guys’.

    Sure, you can’t put anything before the public without a few nuts showing up to trash you. I learned when I published my first humor articles 25 years ago.

    Reply
  37. Don in Arkansas

    Wait, am I reading this correctly? “At our meetings, Dr. Davis sacrifices a goat and then we all spend hours enjoying ritual dancing around a bonfire on our pain-free legs. Sometimes we even dance naked.” Is there a sign-up sheet? How much are the tickets? A goat? Very low-carb! I’m in!

    You’ll get a secret communique soon.

    Reply
  38. Dana

    “Eight-thousand years ago, humans (some of them, anyway) consumed Einkorn wheat. The main similarity between Einkorn wheat and today’s mutant wheat is they’re both called ‘wheat.'”

    Einkorn wheat damaged people too. Just ask a paleopathologist.

    I think people, including Dr. Davis, are still trying to acquit most high-starch and some high-sugar foods despite evidence they aren’t innocent either, letting modern wheat take the fall for every”one” else. I don’t think this is done out of malice, but rather out of ignorance of how various foods work in the human diet. I share that ignorance; I can only voice my suspicions.

    Dr. Price in the 1930s documented several traditional/indigenous groups’ diets and rates of dental caries alongside their corresponding “modernized” population groups. Today’s Weston A. Price Foundation extolls the virtues of grain foods properly processed with lactic acid. But if you look at Price’s numbers, the traditional group with the highest rates of dental caries was the bread-eating Swiss. Their rate of cavities was still far lower than that of their corresponding modernized group down in the city. I suspect that’s because they were eating protective foods as well, namely grass-fed dairy fat. They adored cheese and butter and ate plenty of both. They probably also ate beef and beef fat, which are also protective. (I need to read that chapter more thoroughly, I’m just guessing based on their general lifestyle.)

    “Paleo diet” followers point to the Kitavans as evidence that they can eat all the potatoes and rice they want if they run off the calories. Well, the Kitavans don’t exactly follow a daily fitness routine. They’re pretty laid-back, actually, aside from the labor they need to perform for subsistence purposes. The thing is, they also eat fish and coconut. If they’re anything like other traditional groups, the leftover bones and heads from that fish are made into fish broth, which is a protective food. Coconut is another protective food, especially the fat. Of course they get away with the starch. They’re nourished enough to fight off its effects.

    I do believe cutting carbs is the single best way to prevent, halt, or cure chronic disease because the effects of carbs, from what I can tell, are twofold:

    One, they undermine your nutritional status, causing your body to malfunction. They do this in a number of ways. For example, your body processing carbs has to burn up its B vitamins in order to get the job done. Certain plant foods mess with your gut lining, which in turn messes up your nutrient absorption. Certain plant foods contain antinutrients which mess up your nutrient absorption as well. And a plant-heavy diet is usually a low-fat diet, or at least a diet-not-high-enough-in-fat, which means your mineral absorption suffers.

    Two, once your underlying nutritional status is messed up, you start seeing the effects on blood sugar and insulin that you yourself documented in Fat Head. Elevated insulin leads to blood pressure elevation and a whole slew of other problems (it also encourages cell growth, so it’s probably implicated in cancer). Elevated glucose has the effect of chemically caramelizing tissues, aging you faster. Along with all the other unpleasant stuff that happens, like heart disease and diabetes.

    I would say to anyone who’s convinced plant foods are always healthy as long as Big Ag and Big Food Industry don’t mess with them: Start thinking of animal foods, particularly the organs, bones, and fat, as healthy again. They are best supportive of your overall health. Vegetables and fruit were seasonal *accompaniments* to meat for people in higher latitudes during our hunter-gatherer days. As for people nearer to the equator, they still weren’t anywhere near vegetarian, and they got lots more sunlight too. I’m pretty sure that mattered, whether or not I can yet explain why.

    My two cents, I suppose someone’s mileage will vary.

    If you read his book or follow his blog, you’ll see that Dr. Davis is no fan of sugar and starch.

    Reply
  39. Dana

    OH. Someone else’s comment made me think of this. Also? Our dependence on grains as “a vital food staple” leaves us wide open to starvation. A cultural group MUST be sedentary, meaning not nomadic, if they are farming grain. That means they CANNOT travel around looking for food, since the field must be tended and kept safe from raiders. So if the crop fails, they’re dead.

    There’s a reason it’s been claimed over and over that hunter-gatherers did not suffer famine as we understand it today. The same could be said for nomadic herders. When was the last time you saw a charity raising money to send food to Bedouins? Maybe settled Bedouins, but I’ve never seen an effort like that started for the traditional ones.

    And of course now we have this modern risk that some greedy biotech company wants to take control of the grain supply by polluting it with foreign genes. The funny thing about genetically modifying animals is that it’s pretty easy to tell something’s different about them. Usually they look weird and often they behave weirdly too. But you can’t necessarily tell anything’s been done to your plant foods. A lot of the changes are either invisible or they look like the changes wrought in traditional plant breeding.

    Something to think about. I’m not saying never eat plants again, but we need to seriously rethink what we mean when we say “food staple.”

    Indeed. If one of the chickens we plan to raise has three heads, I know not to eat it.

    Reply
  40. Laurie-Avalanche

    Tom,
    As usual you have tackled the topic with great humour and levity but proving the point of the wheat lobby being utterly ridiculous in their claims against Dr. Davis and his bestselling book. I was literally “LOL”. Dang though…. I’d better dust off my tambourine! 😉

    I was talking about this very “cult” like subject with my mom this morning and she relented her previous claim that I am a zealot about low carbing. I told her if I can help the “Ted’s” of the world (a diabetic co-worker I’m presently coaching on low carbing… who’s doing awesome btw), then call me a zealot! It’s about getting healthy, helping people and improving quality of life. I think it’s my duty to “pay it forward” after regaining my own health.

    Thanks for starting my day with humour, my friend!
    Laurie

    Your friend is lucky you care and got involved.

    Reply
  41. Firebird

    Wait you ate glue? And here all I thought it was good for was sniffing. 🙂

    I sniffed the Elmer’s too, but it had little effect.

    Reply
  42. John King

    I saw where Greenpeace mowed down a small crop of GM wheat – not a fan of Greenpeace, but this GM wheat was intended to have fewer carbs…and the experts say carbs aren’t bad for you??? Then why modify the wheat? Personally, I find that the best use of wheat is for paper mache’.

    Let’s start a huge paper mache trend so they’ll stop trying to get people to eat the stuff.

    Reply
  43. Jason Helmes

    I stumbled on this blog due to a friend’s Facebook post. I watched the movie and read the testimonials. I decided to try it for myself.

    For years, the only way for me to be at a good weight was to run. A lot. Like 12-15 miles per week. If I didn’t do that, I was too flabby for my liking. And I felt hungry. All the time.

    I really didn’t get why I would eat a massive, mixing-bowl sized helping of Cheerios (presumably healthy) at around 8 and be starving/borderline shaking by 10. Shouldn’t that big, healthy meal keep me going? I’d head back for a granola bar to keep the blood sugar up.

    I’ve been LC, almost Paleo for 2 months. I’ve lost 14 pounds, almost all from my waist. I lift weights regularly. Have for years. And as I’ve lost 14 pounds, I’ve actually gotten around 15% STRONGER! Something that NEVER happened with my old diet. When I would lose my belly, I would lose some of my strength, even as I was religiously weight training.

    And the BEST change is my mental mindset. I’m a teacher, and under my old diet, at least 1-2 times per week, I would have a “foggy” day. My students would giggle as I would make math mistakes on the board. (Pre-Algebra. Fun times.) Well, this school year, I have had zero “foggy” days in a month. I thought I was just having a good streak for the first couple of weeks. Then, after some consideration, I realized that my wheat fog had lifted.

    I have a 1 year old girl at home. My in-laws look at me weird when they ask if they should feed my daughter a graham cracker or fruit and I say, “Neither. How about some ham and cheese?” I haven’t even tried to explain it to them. I just pretend I’m a bad father.

    Thanks so much for this blog, it has changed the way I view food, and my diet.

    I apologize for this not being immediately related to your post. I just wanted to share my story!

    I’m happy to hear your story, whichever post it appears under.

    Reply
  44. Angel

    Tom, I bet the taste of Tinkertoys is probably closer to wheat, water and yeast than Elmer’s glue. I don’t remember eating glue, but I remember the taste of Tinkertoys. Initially woody with a little bit of a chemical taste from the paint, followed by a woodsy aftertaste. Mmmm.

    Tinkertoys are good if you serve them with the proper wine.

    Reply
  45. Bevie

    Be sure to have your marinade ready for when you sacrifice the goat. I recommend olive oil and lemon juice.

    We’ll give that a try at the next cult meeting.

    Reply
  46. Lisa

    @Bill Davis – Here’s the permalink to the comment:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R31C0R0YBG9ATA/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=1609611543&nodeID=&tag=&linkCode=

    I’m reading “Wheat Belly” now. I haven’t consumed wheat in many years and can only say that I am much better off for not eating it. 60 pounds lost, and rarely ill. Of course, I also follow a low carb/Paleo/primal lifestyle, but nothing effects me more adversely than wheat did when I tried it again after many months of abstinence. Wheat makes me bloated, swollen, and gassy, not to mention the BG crash.

    Reply

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