This Is What We’re Up Against, Part Five

      194 Comments on This Is What We’re Up Against, Part Five

Here are more “this is what we’re up against” items from the news sent to me by readers:

The Diabetic Diet

By the diabetic diet, I of course mean a diet that will help you become a diabetic … even though that’s not quite what the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse had in mind when designing it.

In case you somehow overlooked it among the many other federal health agencies, the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse (NCD) is a division of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), which is a division of National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is a division of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Ya know, I think what would really improve the nation’s health (NH) would be to add a few more layers (FML) to the federal government’s health bureaucracy (FGHB).  After all, they’ve done such a bang-up job (BUJ) reversing obesity and diabetes over the years.

Anyway, here’s how NCD (a division of NIDDK) is telling people to eat to manage their diabetes:

Healthful eating helps keep your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, in your target range. Physical activity and, if needed, diabetes medicines also help. The diabetes target range is the blood glucose level suggested by diabetes experts for good health. You can help prevent health problems by keeping your blood glucose levels on target.

So far, so good.  But what exactly is the target glucose level suggested by experts?

Target Blood Glucose Levels for People with Diabetes
Before meals: 70 to 130
1 to 2 hours after a meal: less than 180

Well, there you have it, folks:  Diabetics should aim for post-meal glucose levels that are well into the “diabetic” range.  I guess that “if needed, diabetes medicines also help” statement is more like a prediction than a suggestion.  Of course, you pretty much have to set high blood sugar targets when your recommended diet looks like this:

Choose this many servings from these food groups to have 2,000 to 2,400 calories a day:

  • 10 starches
  • 4 vegetables
  • 5 to 7 ounces meat and meat substitutes
  • 2 milks
  • 4 fruits
  • up to 5 fats

Ten starches and four fruits.  Good luck keeping your blood sugar below 180 if you’re already battling diabetes or pre-diabetes.  For the diabetics who are more visually oriented, the NCD (a division of NIDDK) provided this helpful graphic as well:

Well, I can see why they grouped fats and sweets in the same category.  They have nearly opposite effects on your blood sugar, but the important thing is that they both have an S and a T in their names.  Put a couple more letters in between those, and you can spell out what I think of the advice handed out by NCD (a division of NIDDK).

Heart UK’s Ultimate Diet Plan

Britain’s equivalent (I guess) of the American Heart Association refers to itself in press releases as Heart UK – UK’s leading cholesterol charity.  I was of course pleased to see that description.  There are millions of people around the world who can’t afford foods high in cholesterol, and I’m all in favor helping them out.  I’ll happily donate 100 dozen eggs.

Unfortunately, it turns out the cholesterol charity is anti-cholesterol, and they’re promoting a diet to lower cholesterol levels.  Here’s their plan to “revolutionize heart health in the UK”:

Step 1 – Motivational behaviour strategies to drive dietary success and reverse negative consumption patterns.

Here’s the behavior strategy you need to adopt:  go to the pantry and throw out everything that includes sugar or white flour.  Then walk to the fridge and find some meat and eggs.  Cook the eggs and meat and eat them.  Then you’ll feel motivated.

Step 2 – Reducing saturated fat without compromising on treats and taste. Swapping a chocolate éclair for a hot cross bun is not life changing but the 93% saturated fat drop makes the life-saving recommendation to drop our saturated fat intake so much more achievable.

So a chocolate éclair is the key to avoiding heart disease, is it?  Next you’ll be telling me to eat soy.

Steps 3, 4, 5, 6 – A pick ‘n’ mix of four cholesterol-busting foods!

  • Soya foods e.g. soya milk and yogurt alternatives
  • Products with plant sterols/stanols e.g. Alpro soya plus milk alternative, cholesterol ­lowering spreads, cholesterol-lowering yogurts.
  • Nuts
  • Soluble fibre from oats, other whole grain foods and beans and pulses.

 

They should’ve listed “nuts” last -– as a polite commentary on everything above it.  Still, one out of four ain’t a bad hit-to-miss ratio for the typical do-gooder health charity.  (I’m assuming the nuts weren’t roasted in some horrible vegetable oil.)  As for the soy, absolutely, go for it … because what the world needs now is more men with boobs –- they’ll be more understanding when their daughters start puberty.

I must say, though, I can’t help but wonder why Heart UK – the cholesterol charity is so high on soy milk.

The UCLP Ultimate Teaching Tool is available to all health professionals free of charge. The UCLP has been funded by an educational grant from Alpro soya UK.

Boy, it’s really generous of Alpro soya UK to provide health professions with free literature recommending Alpro soya UK products to their patients.  But if they were really smart, they’d team up with whichever company  finally manufactures the manssiere.

Over the Counter Lipitor?

Surprise, surprise … now that the patent on Lipitor is due to expire, Pfizer is hoping to sell the stuff over the counter.

Selling a version of the drug to consumers without a prescription would allow Pfizer to retain some of the $11 billion in annual revenue that Lipitor has been generating.

However, a nonprescription version would not be available immediately after the patent on Lipitor expires because Pfizer would first have to convince the Food and Drug Administration that consumers could take the drug without a doctor’s supervision.

That’s a bit like worrying that heroin addicts may shoot up without a drug-dealer’s supervision.

An over-the-counter version of Lipitor would no doubt be welcomed by insurers because it would cost less.

I can see the advantage there.  Ruining your muscles and your memory shouldn’t be expensive.  You’ll need to save as much money as possible to pay for the walkers and the Alzheimer’s care.

In the past, the F.D.A. advisers have been concerned that over-the counter versions of statins could not be used safely, that some patients who did not need the drugs would take them.

I’d be worried about that too.  It’s much better to have doctors prescribe cholesterol-lowering drugs to people who don’t need them.

Since high cholesterol is a symptomless condition, consumers would not know whether the drug was working without having their cholesterol checked periodically.

Don’t be silly … of course consumers will know if the Lipitor is working.  They’ll wake up in the morning and say, “Holy crap, my muscles and joints are killing me!  It must be the … the … Honey, what’s the name of that stuff I’ve been taking?”

MSN – the More S@#$ Network

MSN Health is, in my opinion, one of the worst offenders when it comes to handing out lousy dietary advice.  Here are a couple of gems from a recent online article titled Get a Grip! 9 easy ways to help lower your cholesterol right now:

5. Double cholesterol whammy.  Dietary cholesterol can elevate your blood cholesterol levels, but saturated fat has an even worse effect. However, the two are often found in the same foods, including meat, butter and full-fat dairy. So by limiting your intake of foods rich in saturated fat, you’ll also help reduce your intake of cholesterol.

Even Ancel Keys, the Grand Poopah of Lipophobes, admitted that dietary cholesterol has no effect on the cholesterol level if your blood.  As for saturated fat, yes, it will raise your cholesterol … specifically, your HDL and your large, fluffy LDL.  Those are both beneficial.

9. Check for tropical oils. Lots of products are now “trans-fat free” but in some cases, these fats are being replaced with saturated fats, such as palm and coconut oils. You may have heard that palm and coconut oils do not negatively affect cholesterol levels, but the research isn’t conclusive and palm kernel oil contains 80 percent saturated fat. Instead, look for products that use polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, which help lower LDL cholesterol.

Hey, now there’s a technique all the bad scientists can applaud:  if a study doesn’t show what you want it to show, simply label the results as “inconclusive.”  I’ve got news for you:  if palm kernel oil and coconut oil did raise cholesterol, the results of those studies would be conclusive.

The Coconut Oil Supermodel

At least someone who spends a lot of time in her underwear knows not to fear coconut oil.

When a Victoria’s Secret runway model confesses her beauty secret, women will undoubtedly listen. Coconut oil is the new buzz in the beauty world, and now it’s been revealed that supermodel Miranda Kerr swears by it. She says that her shiny hair, perfect skin, and svelte body are the results of healthy living and daily use of this good oil.

Miranda Kerr, who famously bounced back to her pre-baby body just weeks after giving birth to her first child with actor Orlando Bloom, confesses in Daily Mail that her beauty secret is coconut oil. The supermodel says she dilutes the oil either in green tea or drizzles it over salads to keep her glowing. “I’ve been drinking it since I was 14 and it’s the one thing I can’t live without,” she tells Daily Mail.

For everyday beauty, coconut oil can be used as an all-over moisturizer, hair conditioner, and as a gentle eye make-up remover.

We’ll just pause here for a moment so the men in the audience can enjoy the idea of a Victoria’s Secret model using coconut oil as an all-over moisturizer.

Okay, guys, that’s enough.  Naturally, the anti-saturated-fat hysterics had to reply to Ms. Kerr’s beauty advice:

US experts yesterday warned against consuming large amounts of coconut oil after Australian supermodel Miranda Kerr said the high-fat oil was the key to her clear skin, shiny hair and trim figure.

The World Health Organization has also warned the oil could contribute to an increased risk of coronary heart disease if taken to excess.

Keith Ayoob, director of the nutrition clinic at the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, said the oil will not give you the body of a supermodel.

It won’t?  Rats!  I’ve been sitting here spreading coconut oil all over myself hoping to look good in a bikini next summer.

“I can’t say I’d want people consuming lots of coconut oil. You should use it sparingly,” Ayoob said.  “You want to cut back on saturated fats in your diet. I don’t know what benefit it would have for weight management because it has just as many calories as any other fat.”

Well, allow me to explain to you, Ayoob the Boob:  the type of fat in coconut oil –- medium-chain triglycerides —  is actually difficult to store in your adipose tissue, so you tend to burn it off instead.  It’s also good for your mood and helps curb your appetite.

Kerr’s dose of four tablespoons a day adds up to about 460 calories, which Ayoob said was too much saturated fat for most people. “She’s getting two and a half times the amount of saturated fat I would recommend for a person consuming 2,000 calories per day,” he said.

Ah, well, if you don’t recommend saturated fat, that proves it’s bad for us.  Sorry I didn’t recognize the logic in that sooner.  I must’ve been distracted by the Ayoobs.

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194 thoughts on “This Is What We’re Up Against, Part Five

  1. The Older Brother

    Buongiorno from Florence, Italy.

    Albert Einstein College of Medicine? How sad that something named after one of the foremost scientific minds ever now means “Freakin’ Liars College of Medicine.”

    Salute!

    Einstein is rolling over in his parallel universe.

    Reply
  2. Barry

    “But if they were really smart, they’d team up with whichever company finally manufactures the manssiere.”

    Actually, it’s called a “bro.”

    Please correct the blog post.

    -Kramer

    If recall, that argument ended (and I do ENDED) badly for Mr. Costanza.

    Reply
  3. LXV

    I float half a tablespoon of coconut oil on my morning tea. It’s fantastic stuff. The slightly sweet coconut taste on top of a yerba mate tea is fantastic.

    And this is what we’re fighting for:
    I devoured Wheat Belly the day it came out (yay Kindles!). My mom was visiting that weekend and I told her about it. Today my dad called me just to say thank you. They each bought a copy of the book and have been wheat free for a week now. He says he feels so much better.

    My sweets and bread loving husband agreed to give up wheat for the month with me. He volunteered to give up sugar last week. He’s feeling great, with no more dips in energy or bouts of hypoglycemia.

    I need to start placing orders for this book and Fathead in bulk to give everyone for Xmas.

    We will happily ship in time for Christmas.

    Reply
  4. Roby

    I just finished reading Wheat Belly, Great book! I wish other people would be more open minded. I just got laughed at last weekend… “You’re eating fat to lose fat?! hahaha” “so it’s a bacon diet?” …/sigh

    I noticed that a lot of low carbers don’t talk about cooking with lard. Whats the deal with that? Do people just not like it? or is there something that i missed on it? I started cooking with lard a little while ago since it lasts us a long time.

    Also, In wheat belly he says to limit Butter… how come?

    I asked him about his position on saturated fat in the next list of questions. As for lard, it’s not easy to find in many areas these days.

    Reply
  5. Robert

    Why is it every time I get worked up about food evangelists or any of the other BS you bring to light on here, I somehow end up spendmy afternoon watching videos of Ron Paul?

    I think there may be a correlation here!

    Probably because you know Ron Paul would leave you alone.

    Reply
  6. Paul Bourret

    Every nutritionist and nurse that I have worked with since I was diagnosed with T2 diabetes has tried to get me to eat something like 225 g/day of carbs. For years, all this bought me was higher blood sugar, more weight and more meds. This past spring, I finally started cutting out the carbs. Since then, my sugar levels have been more stable and lower. My weight has dropped, my A1C is down, and I feel great.

    T2 diabetes is a disease of carbohydrate intolerance…..the only solution is to cut out the carbs.

    Thanks for the info on the coconut oil…..I am filling my bathtub with it now!

    Be careful not to slip on the way out.

    Reply
  7. Nancy

    The American Diabetes Association and everyone that promotes the Diabetic diet should be charged with attempted murder. They KNOW this diet is causing health and death. Because they get zillions of dollars from pharmaceutical and food manufacturers to endorse your products, etc.

    Reply
  8. TonyNZ

    “She tells us that babies and growing children need lots of fats and cholesterol in their diets.”

    My 7-month old gets cranky without getting some meat in the day.

    Interesting as well, I’ve noticed a lot of “experts” recently describing calorie-dense foods as being “saturated with calories”.

    Sounds like they might be trying to instil some onomatophobia (fear of certain words) into the public psyche.

    Reply
  9. Alexandra

    @Bevie I think I may have to give that concoction a try… you have that as breakfast, right? How many hours of satiety?

    Reply
  10. Dragonmamma/Naomi

    Andrea, I use it in pretty much EVERYTHING, including daily “fat bombs”, which are frozen blobs of coconut oil, cocoa and stevia. It lasts me and my husband about 8 months. “Normal” people would probably be better off ordering it by the single gallon or the quart.

    Reply
  11. sharon

    Finally something my mom is right about! She’s been using coconut oil for frying her eggs, moisturizer, and conditioner for years now.

    Does she look like a supermodel?

    Reply
  12. Sid Mannluv

    I don’t understand the message with the supermodel. If I use coconut oil I will end up looking like her (which wouldn’t be so bad) or I will get to date a beautiful woman? Kind of like beer commercials where you drink the right beer and you get all the women.

    I can tell you from experience that the beer-drinking method of getting all the beautiful women doesn’t work.

    Reply
  13. Patricia

    Number one for coconut oil is, I agree, Tropical Traditions. If I’m short on funds, I’ll order from VitaCost.com (54 oz for about $20). Got the 5 gal size from TT and it lasted the two of us over a year, using it everyday in smoothies, etc. I use ghee for most of my frying cuz I don’t get the refined coco oil and don’t like the coconut flavor in my meat and eggs.

    You know, I may not look like a supermodel, but I sure do feel like one. When you’re leaner, have more energy, great skin, clear eyes, shiny hair and a clear, sharp mind it is sooooooo attractive to people. I wish I could develop the art of the quick comeback, tho, when people tell me I’m crazy to eat so much fat and eliminating grains isn’t healthy. All I’ve mastered is looking at them cross-eyed with the definitely witty “Whatever!”

    Reply
  14. bec

    I’m mainly impressed that Miranda Kerr can actually stomach four tablespoons a day. The stuff I have is quite nice but to be perfectly honest eating it is a bit like noshing on a tropical scented candle (it’s only virgin, not refined). If I get past a teaspoon in the morning it’s a miracle, but then I haven’t done this since I was fourteen as she has.

    Just put some in a cup of green tea (not because I have any burning desire to look like Kerr but mainly because I want to be able to get more MCTs into my diet). When it cools a bit, I’ll drink it. Here goes nothing.

    Reply
  15. Sid Mannluv

    I don’t understand the message with the supermodel. If I use coconut oil I will end up looking like her (which wouldn’t be so bad) or I will get to date a beautiful woman? Kind of like beer commercials where you drink the right beer and you get all the women.

    I can tell you from experience that the beer-drinking method of getting all the beautiful women doesn’t work.

    Reply
  16. Dave

    For those who have troubling finding coconut oil, a good place to look is in asian stores, which most cities should have. An example price here is 3,50 euro / 500 gram or ml.

    What you don’t want is (fully) hydrogenated (thus 100% saturated) coconut “butter”, may be labeled differently, carried sometimes by supermarkets intended for baking, which is a solid block at room temperature where you can’t even really cut it but need to chip pieces off.

    Real coconut oil sits between liquid and solid at room temperature, depending on your room temperature of course. When liquid it is fully clear, when solid (still soft) it is milky white. And it’s great! 🙂

    Reply
  17. Patricia

    Number one for coconut oil is, I agree, Tropical Traditions. If I’m short on funds, I’ll order from VitaCost.com (54 oz for about $20). Got the 5 gal size from TT and it lasted the two of us over a year, using it everyday in smoothies, etc. I use ghee for most of my frying cuz I don’t get the refined coco oil and don’t like the coconut flavor in my meat and eggs.

    You know, I may not look like a supermodel, but I sure do feel like one. When you’re leaner, have more energy, great skin, clear eyes, shiny hair and a clear, sharp mind it is sooooooo attractive to people. I wish I could develop the art of the quick comeback, tho, when people tell me I’m crazy to eat so much fat and eliminating grains isn’t healthy. All I’ve mastered is looking at them cross-eyed with the definitely witty “Whatever!”

    Reply
  18. Lizzy

    @Stephanie Have a look around for cheaper coconut flour. Google! Also you can’t just swap it in wheat flour recipes as it has a different consitency. You need to look up specific recipes for coconut flour. It absorbs lots more liquid than wheat flour for one thing.

    Reply
  19. bec

    I’m mainly impressed that Miranda Kerr can actually stomach four tablespoons a day. The stuff I have is quite nice but to be perfectly honest eating it is a bit like noshing on a tropical scented candle (it’s only virgin, not refined). If I get past a teaspoon in the morning it’s a miracle, but then I haven’t done this since I was fourteen as she has.

    Just put some in a cup of green tea (not because I have any burning desire to look like Kerr but mainly because I want to be able to get more MCTs into my diet). When it cools a bit, I’ll drink it. Here goes nothing.

    Reply
  20. Dave

    For those who have troubling finding coconut oil, a good place to look is in asian stores, which most cities should have. An example price here is 3,50 euro / 500 gram or ml.

    What you don’t want is (fully) hydrogenated (thus 100% saturated) coconut “butter”, may be labeled differently, carried sometimes by supermarkets intended for baking, which is a solid block at room temperature where you can’t even really cut it but need to chip pieces off.

    Real coconut oil sits between liquid and solid at room temperature, depending on your room temperature of course. When liquid it is fully clear, when solid (still soft) it is milky white. And it’s great! 🙂

    Reply
  21. Firebird

    I tried to buy lard in the grocery store and wouldn’t you know it, it had partially hydrogenated oil in it! Not pure lard at all.

    Reply
  22. James

    While I agree with many of the radical concepts in nutrition you illuminate, I just have one question after watching the video segments.

    Just exactly how much did McDonald’s pay you?

    You repeatedly mentioned all their products. You repeatedly shilled for them by saying how they didn’t force you to eat there. You hustled the super-size items. And the best thing: you crowed about how you lost weight by eating McDonald’s food. They could not have invented a better viral commercial if they tried.

    Nicely done.

    McDonald’s paid me nothing, and in fact it took quite a bit of convincing to let me shoot in their restaurants. I produced Fat Head by working long hours as a contract programmer and sinking every dime I had (and many more that I borrowed) into the film.

    Spurlock made an entertaining but completely illogical film blaming McDonald’s for causing the obesity epidemic. Now, this may come as a shock to you, but there are people in the world (like me) who are offended when a corporation is publicly accused of a crime it didn’t commit and are willing to point out the flaws in those accusations without being paid to do so. As I believer in personal responsibility (another radical concept), I found Super Size Me’s message (“it’s McDonald’s fault!!”) so inane, I was inspired to reply.

    Also, if you truly care about public health, you should want the blame for the rise in obesity placed where it belongs. You don’t solve a problem by shooting at the wrong target, and McDonald’s is the wrong target.

    Reply
  23. Lizzy

    @Stephanie Have a look around for cheaper coconut flour. Google! Also you can’t just swap it in wheat flour recipes as it has a different consitency. You need to look up specific recipes for coconut flour. It absorbs lots more liquid than wheat flour for one thing.

    Reply
  24. Ailu

    We go thru a gallon of coconut oil every few months here at the house, we use it for almost everything (and inconclusively, our blood panels are better than when we were in our 20’s).

    One warning: Do not use coconut oil as a moisturizer if you are in any way, shape or form, prone to breakouts. Myself and a couple of my girlfriends learned this about a month after using it as such. We looked like we’d been attacked by 20 zillion mosquitoes. lol It does wonders as a hair conditioner, however. 🙂

    Reply
  25. Nowhereman

    “Also, if you truly care about public health, you should want the blame for the rise in obesity placed where it belongs. You don’t solve a problem by shooting at the wrong target, and McDonald’s is the wrong target.”

    Tom, we have an interesting article here about a woman who’s taking up a 31 day McDonalds diet marathon:

    http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/eat-only-mcdonalds-for-a-month-and-run-a-marathon-one-womans-crazy-challenge-2556030/?posted=1

    For once they interviewed an “expert” that understands TRANSfats from vegetable oils are bad for you. But the writer is also a little too enamored of Spurlock’s crap to understand that not only have you eaten at McDonalds and not gotten fat, but several others have as well.

    Most journalists never bothered to ask themselves how Spurlock managed to put away 5,000 calories per day at McDonald’s, which takes some real effort.

    Reply
  26. Firebird

    I tried to buy lard in the grocery store and wouldn’t you know it, it had partially hydrogenated oil in it! Not pure lard at all.

    Reply
  27. James

    While I agree with many of the radical concepts in nutrition you illuminate, I just have one question after watching the video segments.

    Just exactly how much did McDonald’s pay you?

    You repeatedly mentioned all their products. You repeatedly shilled for them by saying how they didn’t force you to eat there. You hustled the super-size items. And the best thing: you crowed about how you lost weight by eating McDonald’s food. They could not have invented a better viral commercial if they tried.

    Nicely done.

    McDonald’s paid me nothing, and in fact it took quite a bit of convincing to let me shoot in their restaurants. I produced Fat Head by working long hours as a contract programmer and sinking every dime I had (and many more that I borrowed) into the film.

    Spurlock made an entertaining but completely illogical film blaming McDonald’s for causing the obesity epidemic. Now, this may come as a shock to you, but there are people in the world (like me) who are offended when a corporation is publicly accused of a crime it didn’t commit and are willing to point out the flaws in those accusations without being paid to do so. As I believer in personal responsibility (another radical concept), I found Super Size Me’s message (“it’s McDonald’s fault!!”) so inane, I was inspired to reply.

    Also, if you truly care about public health, you should want the blame for the rise in obesity placed where it belongs. You don’t solve a problem by shooting at the wrong target, and McDonald’s is the wrong target.

    Reply
  28. Ailu

    We go thru a gallon of coconut oil every few months here at the house, we use it for almost everything (and inconclusively, our blood panels are better than when we were in our 20’s).

    One warning: Do not use coconut oil as a moisturizer if you are in any way, shape or form, prone to breakouts. Myself and a couple of my girlfriends learned this about a month after using it as such. We looked like we’d been attacked by 20 zillion mosquitoes. lol It does wonders as a hair conditioner, however. 🙂

    Reply
  29. Nowhereman

    “Also, if you truly care about public health, you should want the blame for the rise in obesity placed where it belongs. You don’t solve a problem by shooting at the wrong target, and McDonald’s is the wrong target.”

    Tom, we have an interesting article here about a woman who’s taking up a 31 day McDonalds diet marathon:

    http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/eat-only-mcdonalds-for-a-month-and-run-a-marathon-one-womans-crazy-challenge-2556030/?posted=1

    For once they interviewed an “expert” that understands TRANSfats from vegetable oils are bad for you. But the writer is also a little too enamored of Spurlock’s crap to understand that not only have you eaten at McDonalds and not gotten fat, but several others have as well.

    Most journalists never bothered to ask themselves how Spurlock managed to put away 5,000 calories per day at McDonald’s, which takes some real effort.

    Reply
  30. Brooke

    On a related subject, I happened to turn on Dr. Oz (maybe I should rephrase that!) the other day where the topic was women at the age of 40 and weight-gain. (like THE day they turn the big 4-0 they magically gain 20lbs???)

    Anyway, there were a few Oz (and his guest MD.)recommendations for losing those extra pounds..including “exercising more” and “consuming 100 calories less each day”. As a perfect example, there’s a cheeseburger on the table in front of Oz. What does he do? He lifts up the BUN and REMOVES THE CHEESE!!!! I literally SCREAMED at the TV!!! If there were a desk present I would have caused serious damage to my head… but not even CLOSE to the type of damage that Dr. Oz and others like him cause the general population…

    Dr. Oz has probably popularized more bad information than anyone, thanks to Oprah.

    Reply
  31. Lila

    I somehow missed exactly WHY soy is bad. I searched your website but didn’t find much so I “yahooed” it and found this website:

    http://www.foodrenegade.com/dangers-of-soy/

    Is this accurate? If not, could you explain or send me a better link? Thanks!

    On a second note – where did the cavemen get all of this coconut oil to stay healthy (paleo)?

    Outside of areas where coconuts grow, they didn’t. Info on soy:

    http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert

    Reply
  32. Beowulf

    I’m sure the Brits would like me to swap my daily small glass of coconut milk (yep, straight from the can) for a chocolate éclair.

    Reply
  33. J. B. Rainsberger

    @Andrea, since most of our flights fall on the weekend, and we haven’t successfully found suitable food in airports (less concerned about airlines), so rather than sweat it, we’ll just cheat on the days we find ourselves in airports.

    @Tom, I understand about almonds on flights. I don’t think I can spend 12 hours traveling eating only almonds. I need meat.

    Reply
  34. C

    We need more than a supermodel on our side. We need singers, actors, and a heck of a lot more athletes. We need Disney Channel to stop running “The Magic of Healthy Living” where people try and figure out the correct portion sizes for stuff and then Michelle Obama comes and tells them pasta and frozen yogurt is healthy.

    We need all the help we can get — but not from Michelle Obama. She means well, but she’s been fed the same old nonsense about diet.

    Reply
  35. Brooke

    On a related subject, I happened to turn on Dr. Oz (maybe I should rephrase that!) the other day where the topic was women at the age of 40 and weight-gain. (like THE day they turn the big 4-0 they magically gain 20lbs???)

    Anyway, there were a few Oz (and his guest MD.)recommendations for losing those extra pounds..including “exercising more” and “consuming 100 calories less each day”. As a perfect example, there’s a cheeseburger on the table in front of Oz. What does he do? He lifts up the BUN and REMOVES THE CHEESE!!!! I literally SCREAMED at the TV!!! If there were a desk present I would have caused serious damage to my head… but not even CLOSE to the type of damage that Dr. Oz and others like him cause the general population…

    Dr. Oz has probably popularized more bad information than anyone, thanks to Oprah.

    Reply
  36. C

    @Dragonmamma/Naomi

    OMG I love those! I make them with butter when I don’t have coconut oil and call them “chocolate buttercreams”. My little sister loves them.

    Reply
  37. Beowulf

    I’m sure the Brits would like me to swap my daily small glass of coconut milk (yep, straight from the can) for a chocolate éclair.

    Reply
  38. J. B. Rainsberger

    @Andrea, since most of our flights fall on the weekend, and we haven’t successfully found suitable food in airports (less concerned about airlines), so rather than sweat it, we’ll just cheat on the days we find ourselves in airports.

    @Tom, I understand about almonds on flights. I don’t think I can spend 12 hours traveling eating only almonds. I need meat.

    Reply
  39. C

    We need more than a supermodel on our side. We need singers, actors, and a heck of a lot more athletes. We need Disney Channel to stop running “The Magic of Healthy Living” where people try and figure out the correct portion sizes for stuff and then Michelle Obama comes and tells them pasta and frozen yogurt is healthy.

    We need all the help we can get — but not from Michelle Obama. She means well, but she’s been fed the same old nonsense about diet.

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