More On Salt …

      52 Comments on More On Salt …

A couple of interesting tidbits about salt and health came my way via Facebook this morning.  Check out the Q & A from this online article:

Q: Isn’t there universal agreement that these low sodium targets are best for everyone?

A: Although most researchers agree that excessively high sodium intake is not good for health, there is disagreement about the ideal level of daily sodium intake. Dr. David McCarron and other researchers from the University of California at Davis and Washington University in St. Louis have questioned the feasibility of aiming for such low sodium intake targets. McCarron and colleagues point out that contrary to popular belief, sodium intake has not increased or decreased during recent decades and that humans naturally consume significantly more than the new recommendations for potentially valid physiological reasons.

It is well-known that sodium is one of the few nutrients for which humans have a “specific appetite,” meaning that if we are low in the nutrient we crave, we seek out foods that provide it. McCarron stresses that when sodium levels in the body drop too low, there are a series of hormonal responses that may have undesirable long-term consequences.

Q: What are some possible negative consequences of excessive reduction of sodium intake?

A: Two studies out of Australia, hot off the press in the journal Diabetes Care, report that for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics, low sodium intake was associated with increased risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease and all other causes. This was not completely surprising because it is known that low sodium intake results in increased insulin resistance. This means that more insulin is needed to stimulate insulin-sensitive cells to remove glucose from the blood. Although these studies do not prove cause and effect, they do stress the need for caution in making sodium recommendations and the need to conduct appropriately controlled human studies.

Another study found that when adults (ages 40 to 65 whose blood pressure exceeded 120 over 80) added vegetable juice containing 480 to 960 mg of sodium to their daily diet, their blood pressure dropped during this 12-week study. This juice also added a similar amount of potassium to their diets.

McCarron points out that worldwide sodium intake varies between about 3,100 and 3,800 mg per day. When sodium intake drops too far below 3,000 mg per day, hormonal changes apparently trigger the drive to seek out food sources of sodium.

Low sodium intake increases insulin resistance?  Have to admit, that was a new one on me.  But here’s a link to a study that came to exactly that conclusion.

Yeah, uh, but, you see, there’s this one tribe in the Amazon where people have a low sodium intake and they’re really, really healthy …

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52 thoughts on “More On Salt …

  1. aajayunlimited

    I’ve noticed that salt–whether it is high sugar side effects or it lowers blood sugar–has positive effects in this area. When I feel extremely nauseated from having eaten too much sugar at a sitting or over time, salt almost completely reverses it! It needs to be checked out, because it does work! Salt may raise the blood pressure and it does, but what if sugar and salt actually intercept and counteract each other?! Still, even if this isn’t the case, vinegar and its recipes(mustard, hot sauce, etc.); garlic; onions; hot peppers; etc. all lower the blood pressure significantly, so why all the fuss about a little salt here and there to help with rising blood sugar? Sugar is not easily avoidable at a moderate level, esp. if you are poor, in debt, or have a fairly good sized family. Salt helps you in this area, but(there’s garlic salt), cinnamon, turmeric powder, ginger, onion, etc. to be used colaberatively. Salt effects are almost immediate; so, go beyond what the gov’t/health officials say. Find out what many users say about it! Weigh this what the pundits say, because the pundits often are either biased or influenced by someone or something(this could be the way they were taught or this way could be outdated practice or MONEY or fear).

    Reply
  2. aajayunlimited

    I’ve noticed that salt–whether it is high sugar side effects or it lowers blood sugar–has positive effects in this area. When I feel extremely nauseated from having eaten too much sugar at a sitting or over time, salt almost completely reverses it! It needs to be checked out, because it does work! Salt may raise the blood pressure and it does, but what if sugar and salt actually intercept and counteract each other?! Still, even if this isn’t the case, vinegar and its recipes(mustard, hot sauce, etc.); garlic; onions; hot peppers; etc. all lower the blood pressure significantly, so why all the fuss about a little salt here and there to help with rising blood sugar? Sugar is not easily avoidable at a moderate level, esp. if you are poor, in debt, or have a fairly good sized family. Salt helps you in this area, but(there’s garlic salt), cinnamon, turmeric powder, ginger, onion, etc. to be used colaberatively. Salt effects are almost immediate; so, go beyond what the gov’t/health officials say. Find out what many users say about it! Weigh this what the pundits say, because the pundits often are either biased or influenced by someone or something(this could be the way they were taught or this way could be outdated practice or MONEY or fear).

    Reply

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