Weekend Bonus: Hulu, Viewer Stories

      102 Comments on Weekend Bonus: Hulu, Viewer Stories

When I do that Hulu that I do so well …

I’m not sure why, but Fat Head has surged in popularity on Hulu again.  I received notification yesterday that the film was ranked #1 most popular in the documentary category, and #3 in all movies.  Outstanding.  I know most of you have already seen it, but for U.S. residents who haven’t, I’m embedding the link below.

http://www.hulu.com/fat-head

 

Hometown Boy Does Well

A resident of Springfield, Illinois, where I spent most of my school years and where my family still lives, posted a Fat Head success story on his blog.  Here are some quotes:

Back in early March Angie and I stumbled upon a documentary called Fat Head on Netflix streaming … Angie and I found the results of the film, and the revelations about nutrition, intriguing.

We began studying up on low carb nutrition. We found the reasoning to be sound, but the only way to know for sure was to try it ourselves and see what happened. So about five weeks ago Angie and I started our low carb diets (with additional research we are slowly converting to a paleo diet, but that is for another post), and the results have been phenomenal. In the last five weeks we have both lost over ten pounds, and over three inches from around the waist. There has been a tremendous upswing in both our attitudes and energy levels. In fact, I’ve found myself with so much energy I’ve been walking three miles or more a day just to get rid of it.

But that’s not the best part.

The best part is that Andy is a type 2 diabetic who found that changing his diet allowed him to get his glucose under control.  You can read the rest of his story on his blog.

Way to go Andy!  On one my future trips home to Springfield, let’s take our wives out to dinner together.

Can we please stop scaring the kids now?

I received this email a couple of days ago:

Several months ago, my daughters and I watched “Supersize Me” together. Little did I know, that video had a dramatic effect in my 12-year-old. She was probably already close to developing anorexia (My wife and I had been knocking fast food, fat America, bad food corps. etc for several years by then – if that plays any role), but she states that the feeling some foods were poison, and that she would die if she even consumed a small amount, definitely took hold right after the viewing. Her 5’6″ frame dropped to 115 before we realized what was going on. I’d try to make her eat something extra and high in calories, but she would cry and panic.

We had been working with her for several weeks, keeping her weight from dropping further, but we weren’t making much progress with her perspectives on food, until we watched your documentary together last week. She held her head in disbelief throughout, and asked me if what she just watched was true. I assured her I would investigate it myself. She asked if we could watch it again, and this time she wanted to take notes.

Later in the week, she started eating foods like meat and cheese, without putting up her usual fight. She dumped her oatbran for eggs and Spam for breakfast (she use to love Spam when she was younger – we always told her ‘that stuff will kill you’). She’s now asking for more chances to eat when we’re out and about; that’s the real shocker.

It’s too early to say that video cured her, but it certainly made a bigger impression on her than I did (and undid the damage from the earlier video). You changed the eating habits of my entire family, for the better – thanks again! Keep up the good fight.

In another exchange of emails, the father told me his daughter had also been obsessing over her BMI.  That’s one of the many reasons I’m against governments requiring schools to measure and report BMI scores for students.  (The biggest reason being that it’s none of their flippin’ business.)  The last thing we need is the federal government telling kids they’re too fat, then recommending low-fat, calorie-restricted, grain-based diets as the cure.  Lord only knows how many eating disorders will result.

Kids need real food with plenty of natural fats.  If that’s what we feed them, their appetites will handle the rest.  Scaring them is both pointless and counterproductive.

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102 thoughts on “Weekend Bonus: Hulu, Viewer Stories

  1. SDG

    Congrats in the surge in interest!

    Amy – re being able to now eat dairy, I have experienced a similar effect since eating low carb. I believe that the reason I couldn’t tolerate dairy previoulsy was because of the damage wheat did to my intestinal tract. Going off grains meant it could repair, and thus dairy is no longer a problem.

    Reply
  2. Jo

    What type of exercise do you recommend for weight loss?

    I think Mark Sisson had it right in his book “The Primal Blueprint.” Move like Grok, your paleolithic ancestor: walk, sprint like crazy now and then, and lift heavy things. I lift weights once per week, take a lot of walks (which has minimal effect for weight loss, but I like walking) and engage in all-out sprints a few times per week.

    Lately those sprints have taken the form of foot races with my seven-year-old. I coaxed her into sprinting by turning it into a game. I give her a big head start and make sure she usually wins to keep her enthusiasm high. She loves kickin’ Dad’s butt at any form of competition.

    Reply
  3. LCNana

    Hi Tom. Hope you and your family had a wonderful Easter weekend.

    Will you consider putting up your speech after you return from the cruise? All of us would love to read it!!

    By the way, how do you all eat on this cruise? Do you request special meals? Or is the deal that you can eat properly from the variety that is provided to all? From what I remember on a cruise I took years ago even the buffets were carb heavy, and the set meals at dinner also had quite small portions of meat. Thanks.

    I plan to upload the speech when we return. On the cruise, we simply order the meat/seafood entrees, the salads, the green vegetable sides. If the entree is a small steak, you can tell the wait staff you’d like the shrimp too (or whatever) and they’ll bring it.

    Reply
  4. LCNana

    I’ve been meaning to mention, Tom, that we have been feeding our dog raw meat at every meal with NO grains whatsoever for about 6 months now. The transformation is amazing. She went from an overweight, greasy coated sad sack to a slim and trim, glossy fresh feeling coat, hungry for every meal sweetie.

    How cruel we feel for feeding her grains, especially in little dry pellets full of chemicals. There were many times that we had to put cooked meat on top to get her to eat the stuff. Now she gets fresh raw meat with a few tbs raw pumpkin mixed in and she loves it. THE BONUS? HER POOP DOESN’T STINK!!!!!!!!!

    I’m not willing to report on ours!!

    Yup, I wish I could go back in time and feed my dogs real food. One of them died of stomach cancer, and I’ll bet the grain-based dog food was to blame.

    Reply
  5. Maureen

    Tom, love your blog (started reading it as soon as I saw ‘Fathead’)! Not only because you provide so much good info in an entertaining way, but because you have a ton of informed and interesting followers. I find reading the comments and following the links they (and you) provide to be such a great education. Thanks !!!!

    I’m with you. I love my well-informed commenters. I probably get half my ideas and information from readers these days.

    Reply
  6. Firebird

    I thought I’d post this exchange from the British comedy, “The Inbetweeners”. The set up, it is Will McKenzie’s 17th birthday and he is planning a dinner party for him and his three friends, who are basically kids who are neither cool, nerds or have any sophistication to them. Will decides on a Coq au vin and asks his friend Simon for his opinion.

    WILL: How about Coq au vin?

    SIMON: Why are you even asking? If it were up to me we’d all have Big Macs.

    WILL: Big Macs? Did you not see “Super Size Me”?

    SIMON: Yeah, and it made me really want a Big Mac.

    Ha! My reaction exactly.

    Reply
  7. Lynnanne

    If only I could get the relatives to watch your movie. For Easter dinner, the Fiancé and I brought the steak, ribs, chicken and lamb. The relatives brought cheesy potatoes, garlic bread, cheesecake and carrots in sugar syrup. (Yeah, we got the wallet-gouging in that deal!) As is usual at these gatherings, the relatives went on and on about how much weight we’d lost, how healthy we look and how they wished they could lose weight like we did. Then they were aghast as they saw us tuck into the meat, telling us we were going to gain all our weight back. Again I tried to explain that fat doesn’t make you fat and again I got the horrified stares. I said that we ate bacon and eggs for breakfast. “Every day????” they shouted in horror. One cousin started a lecture on “your body needs carbohydrates.” I asked for what, exactly and of course she couldn’t answer. They all shook their heads sadly, convinced we were “ruining our health” as they shoveled in the cheesy potatoes and garlic bread. Three of the women were wearing my former fat clothes. I think the phrase “cognitive disconnect” applies here.

    Happens all the time. Fortunately, many of my close relatives got the message and changed their diets.

    Reply
  8. Bridget

    I tell everybody about Fat Head. I especially tell them when they start telling me how I need to lose weight by eating fat free stuff. I wish I could convince my fiancee’s grandmother to go carb free to help her diabetes. Some people are just too set in their ways.

    You just have to let some people go.

    Reply
  9. Jo

    What type of exercise do you recommend for weight loss?

    I think Mark Sisson had it right in his book “The Primal Blueprint.” Move like Grok, your paleolithic ancestor: walk, sprint like crazy now and then, and lift heavy things. I lift weights once per week, take a lot of walks (which has minimal effect for weight loss, but I like walking) and engage in all-out sprints a few times per week.

    Lately those sprints have taken the form of foot races with my seven-year-old. I coaxed her into sprinting by turning it into a game. I give her a big head start and make sure she usually wins to keep her enthusiasm high. She loves kickin’ Dad’s butt at any form of competition.

    Reply
  10. LCNana

    Hi Tom. Hope you and your family had a wonderful Easter weekend.

    Will you consider putting up your speech after you return from the cruise? All of us would love to read it!!

    By the way, how do you all eat on this cruise? Do you request special meals? Or is the deal that you can eat properly from the variety that is provided to all? From what I remember on a cruise I took years ago even the buffets were carb heavy, and the set meals at dinner also had quite small portions of meat. Thanks.

    I plan to upload the speech when we return. On the cruise, we simply order the meat/seafood entrees, the salads, the green vegetable sides. If the entree is a small steak, you can tell the wait staff you’d like the shrimp too (or whatever) and they’ll bring it.

    Reply
  11. tracker

    I was thinking the other night that without the internet we would know none of this. It applies to other areas as well. Think of a word and wonder what it means? Or where it came from? Just google it. Want to know about something you saw on TV? Again, just google it. Word spreads like wildfire on here, even to people who normally don’t pick up books. And that is why your movie is so invaluable. I have a friend who was complaining about her high blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar and I thought about telling her to read “Why we get fat” and realized she probably wouldn’t. Instead I pointed her to your movie, so I hope she watches. It’s definitely a great thing for people who don’t read for whatever reason. It’s great to hear that your movie has helped so many people.

    I love the digital age for exactly that reason. In one of my media studies classes in college, we learned about the role of information gatekeepers; if you wanted to sway public opinion, you had to sway the gatekeepers first, or no one heard your message anyway. Now the gatekeepers have lost control of the gates.

    Reply
  12. LCNana

    I’ve been meaning to mention, Tom, that we have been feeding our dog raw meat at every meal with NO grains whatsoever for about 6 months now. The transformation is amazing. She went from an overweight, greasy coated sad sack to a slim and trim, glossy fresh feeling coat, hungry for every meal sweetie.

    How cruel we feel for feeding her grains, especially in little dry pellets full of chemicals. There were many times that we had to put cooked meat on top to get her to eat the stuff. Now she gets fresh raw meat with a few tbs raw pumpkin mixed in and she loves it. THE BONUS? HER POOP DOESN’T STINK!!!!!!!!!

    I’m not willing to report on ours!!

    Yup, I wish I could go back in time and feed my dogs real food. One of them died of stomach cancer, and I’ll bet the grain-based dog food was to blame.

    Reply
  13. Maureen

    Tom, love your blog (started reading it as soon as I saw ‘Fathead’)! Not only because you provide so much good info in an entertaining way, but because you have a ton of informed and interesting followers. I find reading the comments and following the links they (and you) provide to be such a great education. Thanks !!!!

    I’m with you. I love my well-informed commenters. I probably get half my ideas and information from readers these days.

    Reply
  14. Firebird

    I thought I’d post this exchange from the British comedy, “The Inbetweeners”. The set up, it is Will McKenzie’s 17th birthday and he is planning a dinner party for him and his three friends, who are basically kids who are neither cool, nerds or have any sophistication to them. Will decides on a Coq au vin and asks his friend Simon for his opinion.

    WILL: How about Coq au vin?

    SIMON: Why are you even asking? If it were up to me we’d all have Big Macs.

    WILL: Big Macs? Did you not see “Super Size Me”?

    SIMON: Yeah, and it made me really want a Big Mac.

    Ha! My reaction exactly.

    Reply
  15. Firebird

    In reply to Dr. Chilton, I too, was a health skeptic on Dr. Mercola’s site…and he banned me because he would promote something like Himalayan Sea Salt or Krill Oil and low and behold…he JUST HAPPENED TO SELL IT, and I called him on it.

    Reply
  16. Lori

    @LCNana, I’m feeding my dog a lacto-paleo diet now. Her poop isn’t stinky now, and several months ago when I started giving her liver a few times a week, the constant need for anal gland expression went away. Unfortunately, she’s gained weight on the diet–she really loves the food and I didn’t want her to be hungry. (I can eat all I want on our diet; she, apparently, cannot.) The vet suggested diet dog food to keep an exact count of calories every day. I didn’t ask him if he weighed his food and counted every calorie himself, or knew anyone other than anorexics who do that. I’m just going to keep her calories around 1,000 per day and see how she does.

    @Tom, my last dog had oral melanoma. On the advice of a holistic vet, I fed him grain-free dog food and gave him some supplements. He lived over a year after being diagnosed–a lot longer than the three months or so the vet predicted.

    Reply
  17. Your Older Brother

    @LCNana:

    Funny you should mention pets. Here’s an AP item headline from the Sunday edition of my local paper:

    “Analysis: diabetes up in U.S. pets”

    from the text:

    “Nationally, diabetes rates increased by near­ly a third among dogs in the last four years and by 16 percent among cats. It is much more common among cats. By comparison, human diagnoses of diabetes rose 10 percent over the same period…”

    And of course, the bang head on desk conclusion:

    ” …We have increasing obesity in dogs and cats, just like in humans. It’s no mystery how that occurs: overfeeding and lack of exercise.”

    Didn’t anyone tell you that giving meat to your pets is A HEART ATTACK IN A BOWL?

    Now that people are injecting their pets with insulin, it can’t be too long before Fido gets statins in his Alpo.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  18. Lynnanne

    If only I could get the relatives to watch your movie. For Easter dinner, the Fiancé and I brought the steak, ribs, chicken and lamb. The relatives brought cheesy potatoes, garlic bread, cheesecake and carrots in sugar syrup. (Yeah, we got the wallet-gouging in that deal!) As is usual at these gatherings, the relatives went on and on about how much weight we’d lost, how healthy we look and how they wished they could lose weight like we did. Then they were aghast as they saw us tuck into the meat, telling us we were going to gain all our weight back. Again I tried to explain that fat doesn’t make you fat and again I got the horrified stares. I said that we ate bacon and eggs for breakfast. “Every day????” they shouted in horror. One cousin started a lecture on “your body needs carbohydrates.” I asked for what, exactly and of course she couldn’t answer. They all shook their heads sadly, convinced we were “ruining our health” as they shoveled in the cheesy potatoes and garlic bread. Three of the women were wearing my former fat clothes. I think the phrase “cognitive disconnect” applies here.

    Happens all the time. Fortunately, many of my close relatives got the message and changed their diets.

    Reply
  19. Bridget

    I tell everybody about Fat Head. I especially tell them when they start telling me how I need to lose weight by eating fat free stuff. I wish I could convince my fiancee’s grandmother to go carb free to help her diabetes. Some people are just too set in their ways.

    You just have to let some people go.

    Reply
  20. tracker

    I was thinking the other night that without the internet we would know none of this. It applies to other areas as well. Think of a word and wonder what it means? Or where it came from? Just google it. Want to know about something you saw on TV? Again, just google it. Word spreads like wildfire on here, even to people who normally don’t pick up books. And that is why your movie is so invaluable. I have a friend who was complaining about her high blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar and I thought about telling her to read “Why we get fat” and realized she probably wouldn’t. Instead I pointed her to your movie, so I hope she watches. It’s definitely a great thing for people who don’t read for whatever reason. It’s great to hear that your movie has helped so many people.

    I love the digital age for exactly that reason. In one of my media studies classes in college, we learned about the role of information gatekeepers; if you wanted to sway public opinion, you had to sway the gatekeepers first, or no one heard your message anyway. Now the gatekeepers have lost control of the gates.

    Reply
  21. Firebird

    In reply to Dr. Chilton, I too, was a health skeptic on Dr. Mercola’s site…and he banned me because he would promote something like Himalayan Sea Salt or Krill Oil and low and behold…he JUST HAPPENED TO SELL IT, and I called him on it.

    Reply
  22. Lori

    @LCNana, I’m feeding my dog a lacto-paleo diet now. Her poop isn’t stinky now, and several months ago when I started giving her liver a few times a week, the constant need for anal gland expression went away. Unfortunately, she’s gained weight on the diet–she really loves the food and I didn’t want her to be hungry. (I can eat all I want on our diet; she, apparently, cannot.) The vet suggested diet dog food to keep an exact count of calories every day. I didn’t ask him if he weighed his food and counted every calorie himself, or knew anyone other than anorexics who do that. I’m just going to keep her calories around 1,000 per day and see how she does.

    @Tom, my last dog had oral melanoma. On the advice of a holistic vet, I fed him grain-free dog food and gave him some supplements. He lived over a year after being diagnosed–a lot longer than the three months or so the vet predicted.

    Reply
  23. Lori

    More on pets: some months ago, my dog started putting on weight. I was only feeding her 2 cups of dog food and a carrot a day–that’s 765 calories. Some research on the web suggests around 1100 to 1200 calories for a dog her size. I’m sure the 50% carb content in the dog food had nothing to do with her weight gain, though. It must have been that I didn’t tie her to the treadmill and make her run her tail off.

    Reply
  24. Your Older Brother

    @LCNana:

    Funny you should mention pets. Here’s an AP item headline from the Sunday edition of my local paper:

    “Analysis: diabetes up in U.S. pets”

    from the text:

    “Nationally, diabetes rates increased by near­ly a third among dogs in the last four years and by 16 percent among cats. It is much more common among cats. By comparison, human diagnoses of diabetes rose 10 percent over the same period…”

    And of course, the bang head on desk conclusion:

    “ …We have increasing obesity in dogs and cats, just like in humans. It’s no mystery how that occurs: overfeeding and lack of exercise.”

    Didn’t anyone tell you that giving meat to your pets is A HEART ATTACK IN A BOWL?

    Now that people are injecting their pets with insulin, it can’t be too long before Fido gets statins in his Alpo.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  25. Stephanie O

    Statins in the dog food, and the people won’t even know why Fido won’t go outside to play and is so tired he has to go in the house. Fido won’t be able to tell us about the muscle aches and memory problems he is having now, and he will get fatter. But they will have to sell those statins somewhere!

    I have switched my dogs to a grain free dog food. I tried adding some raw but one of them cannot tolerate it yet. But she eats less and does not beg for food all of the time. Sadly, like me, her little metabolisim is broken and she has not lost any weight yet.

    Reply
  26. Lori

    More on pets: some months ago, my dog started putting on weight. I was only feeding her 2 cups of dog food and a carrot a day–that’s 765 calories. Some research on the web suggests around 1100 to 1200 calories for a dog her size. I’m sure the 50% carb content in the dog food had nothing to do with her weight gain, though. It must have been that I didn’t tie her to the treadmill and make her run her tail off.

    Reply
  27. Stephanie O

    Statins in the dog food, and the people won’t even know why Fido won’t go outside to play and is so tired he has to go in the house. Fido won’t be able to tell us about the muscle aches and memory problems he is having now, and he will get fatter. But they will have to sell those statins somewhere!

    I have switched my dogs to a grain free dog food. I tried adding some raw but one of them cannot tolerate it yet. But she eats less and does not beg for food all of the time. Sadly, like me, her little metabolisim is broken and she has not lost any weight yet.

    Reply
  28. Lizzy

    @Amy
    Yes the same thing has happened to me! Since eliminating grains/wheat I can have all the milk I want with no bad effects (except weight gain Ha Ha). It’s the grains ripping your insides apart. Now they are healing 🙂

    Reply
  29. H

    I can remember feeling exactly the same way when I was in my teens. It was the 90s and it seemed the low fat craze was even bigger back then. I remember feeling like just about everything was supposed to be bad for us. Well after a while, it occurred to me that it would just be easier to not eat anything at all…. and that’s exactly what I would do.

    All of this fear mongering about dietary fat and Fat America does indeed have an effect on young girls. I would try to fill up on fat free yogurt and other low fat snacks (loaded with sugar of course) and then become even more frustrated when the chubbiness wouldn’t go away. When that didn’t work, I felt I had no choice but drastic measures like starving myself (or worse, throwing up my meal). Then the sugar cravings could cause binging episodes later on…which would lead to more fasting, extreme calorie restriction, etc, etc….

    Yep, I definitely think there is a relationship between low fat dieting and eating disorders. A low fat/high sugar diet feeds into the binge/purge cycle. If low fat diets and BMIs are forced into schools, eating disorders among girls will probably increase.

    Reply
  30. LCNana

    Again on the raw meat for pets: we don’t count calories for poochie – she’s 60 lbs so she gets 1/2 lb morning and 1/2 lb dinner – that’s it. And NO snacks. Her food is raw chicken – including skin, bones, guts, etc. ground up like burger, with 10% veggies like carrot, parsley etc. We could order it all meat but the maker recommends a little veggie as dogs would eat the stomach contents of live kills. We have to drive a fair bit to pick it up but it’s already frozen solid and comes in 1 lb bags – perfect! I have to stop myself from defrosting it for dinner!!

    Actually we had to teach our dog to eat the stuff – she was used to crunching the little pellets. But once she caught on to the texture she slurps it right up. We sometimes give her the little tips from chicken wings and boy she crunches them up a treat. We’re supposed to love our pets – and some people love animals more than people (like those nutty PETA folks) but yet we feed them crap for the most part.

    Free the animal (ha, ha) and give him/her real food!!!

    Reply
  31. Lizzy

    @Amy
    Yes the same thing has happened to me! Since eliminating grains/wheat I can have all the milk I want with no bad effects (except weight gain Ha Ha). It’s the grains ripping your insides apart. Now they are healing 🙂

    Reply
  32. Sarah M.

    I want to say THANK YOU. Thank you for not just keeping this information to yourself and leaving the rest of us to poison ourselves. I watched Fat Head a little over a month ago. My husband has lost ten pounds, my three-year-old has stopped running in circles for hours at a time, I’m down two pants sizes, but most importantly I have enough energy to take care of my kids without antidepressant medication. I actually told my doctor, I’m not sad, I just can’t get anything done without it. That’s no longer true. I think this has changed our lives in ways we can’t even realize yet. I also found Mark’s Daily Apple blog off of your blog, and it is full of great information too, but I never would have found it without the documentary. I’m so angry over the wasted years. This isn’t just crazy, it’s manslaughter. The people who supported a low fat diet with no science to back it need to be brought to justice, in my opinion. I used to work in a preschool with an obese little girl in my class. Her mother’s solution was to stop giving her a sandwich in her lunch and that left her with a juice box, chips, and a granola bar. We’ve got to get the word out before more lives are ruined by this misinformation.

    Outstanding, Sarah. I feel the same way about the wasted years, but now we just focus on the years ahead.

    Reply
  33. H

    I can remember feeling exactly the same way when I was in my teens. It was the 90s and it seemed the low fat craze was even bigger back then. I remember feeling like just about everything was supposed to be bad for us. Well after a while, it occurred to me that it would just be easier to not eat anything at all…. and that’s exactly what I would do.

    All of this fear mongering about dietary fat and Fat America does indeed have an effect on young girls. I would try to fill up on fat free yogurt and other low fat snacks (loaded with sugar of course) and then become even more frustrated when the chubbiness wouldn’t go away. When that didn’t work, I felt I had no choice but drastic measures like starving myself (or worse, throwing up my meal). Then the sugar cravings could cause binging episodes later on…which would lead to more fasting, extreme calorie restriction, etc, etc….

    Yep, I definitely think there is a relationship between low fat dieting and eating disorders. A low fat/high sugar diet feeds into the binge/purge cycle. If low fat diets and BMIs are forced into schools, eating disorders among girls will probably increase.

    Reply
  34. LCNana

    Again on the raw meat for pets: we don’t count calories for poochie – she’s 60 lbs so she gets 1/2 lb morning and 1/2 lb dinner – that’s it. And NO snacks. Her food is raw chicken – including skin, bones, guts, etc. ground up like burger, with 10% veggies like carrot, parsley etc. We could order it all meat but the maker recommends a little veggie as dogs would eat the stomach contents of live kills. We have to drive a fair bit to pick it up but it’s already frozen solid and comes in 1 lb bags – perfect! I have to stop myself from defrosting it for dinner!!

    Actually we had to teach our dog to eat the stuff – she was used to crunching the little pellets. But once she caught on to the texture she slurps it right up. We sometimes give her the little tips from chicken wings and boy she crunches them up a treat. We’re supposed to love our pets – and some people love animals more than people (like those nutty PETA folks) but yet we feed them crap for the most part.

    Free the animal (ha, ha) and give him/her real food!!!

    Reply
  35. Sarah M.

    I want to say THANK YOU. Thank you for not just keeping this information to yourself and leaving the rest of us to poison ourselves. I watched Fat Head a little over a month ago. My husband has lost ten pounds, my three-year-old has stopped running in circles for hours at a time, I’m down two pants sizes, but most importantly I have enough energy to take care of my kids without antidepressant medication. I actually told my doctor, I’m not sad, I just can’t get anything done without it. That’s no longer true. I think this has changed our lives in ways we can’t even realize yet. I also found Mark’s Daily Apple blog off of your blog, and it is full of great information too, but I never would have found it without the documentary. I’m so angry over the wasted years. This isn’t just crazy, it’s manslaughter. The people who supported a low fat diet with no science to back it need to be brought to justice, in my opinion. I used to work in a preschool with an obese little girl in my class. Her mother’s solution was to stop giving her a sandwich in her lunch and that left her with a juice box, chips, and a granola bar. We’ve got to get the word out before more lives are ruined by this misinformation.

    Outstanding, Sarah. I feel the same way about the wasted years, but now we just focus on the years ahead.

    Reply
  36. tracker

    @Sarah M., one could argue it’s murder, as manslaughter is accidental. The people who pushed the low-fat nonsense knew their data didn’t support it but ignored it. And still do.

    My mother’s best friend was a diabetic and died a fairly young age. It didn’t have to be that way.

    Reply
  37. tracker

    @Sarah M., one could argue it’s murder, as manslaughter is accidental. The people who pushed the low-fat nonsense knew their data didn’t support it but ignored it. And still do.

    My mother’s best friend was a diabetic and died a fairly young age. It didn’t have to be that way.

    Reply
  38. Lori

    @LCNana–good to know how much you feed your dog. I’d like my dog to be about 60 pounds. I made a spreadsheet to keep her intake around 1000 calories a day, which amounts to 3/4 pound of meat plus some veg and cooking fat. I’m happy to say my dog seems satisfied. (Anyone who’s interested can download the spreadsheet from a link on my blog.)

    The vet recommended 700 calories per day. I’m sure that’s true for high-carb food–Molly was gaining weight on 765 calories per day of the stuff.

    @Sarah M, my mom changed her bad eating habits at age 80. She was in a second-rate rehab center and desperate to get well and go home. I shared what I’d learned about low-carb diets from the Heart Scan Blog, and she went along. For the half of her life that I’ve known her (over 40 years!), she was tired, cranky, depressed and obese. Now, she’s doing better at age 81 than 51, and she’s looking forward to walking and driving again (possibly), and she’s finally out of her perpetually crappy mood. This, living with my father, who eats sugar all day. I’m proud of her.

    Reply
  39. Lori

    @LCNana–good to know how much you feed your dog. I’d like my dog to be about 60 pounds. I made a spreadsheet to keep her intake around 1000 calories a day, which amounts to 3/4 pound of meat plus some veg and cooking fat. I’m happy to say my dog seems satisfied. (Anyone who’s interested can download the spreadsheet from a link on my blog.)

    The vet recommended 700 calories per day. I’m sure that’s true for high-carb food–Molly was gaining weight on 765 calories per day of the stuff.

    @Sarah M, my mom changed her bad eating habits at age 80. She was in a second-rate rehab center and desperate to get well and go home. I shared what I’d learned about low-carb diets from the Heart Scan Blog, and she went along. For the half of her life that I’ve known her (over 40 years!), she was tired, cranky, depressed and obese. Now, she’s doing better at age 81 than 51, and she’s looking forward to walking and driving again (possibly), and she’s finally out of her perpetually crappy mood. This, living with my father, who eats sugar all day. I’m proud of her.

    Reply
  40. Amy

    @SDG
    @Lizzy
    I agree with the grain hypothesis because just this week I had some fried chicken and was sick all day exactly in the same way I would have been sick with dairy. Just that little bit of flour coating messed me up. Thanks guys I dont feel like an anomaly (sp?)
    Oh yea and also my spring alergies are non-existant, I would be taking some serious medicine to just get through the day and I barely sneeze now.

    Reply
  41. Amy

    @SDG
    @Lizzy
    I agree with the grain hypothesis because just this week I had some fried chicken and was sick all day exactly in the same way I would have been sick with dairy. Just that little bit of flour coating messed me up. Thanks guys I dont feel like an anomaly (sp?)
    Oh yea and also my spring alergies are non-existant, I would be taking some serious medicine to just get through the day and I barely sneeze now.

    Reply
  42. Christian Vu

    I just saw the movie on Hulu (via xbox 360). i actually was just checking the new hulu app for my xbox when i stumbled on this movie. Thought it was another type of “Super Size Me” but soon found out that that movie was bologna; intrigued me. 1 hour 44 mins later im now at an aw and have to rethink everything that ive come to known about what is good and what is bad for me to eat. Thanks for the movie.

    Thank you for watching.

    Reply

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