A Free Education

      38 Comments on A Free Education

One box of DVDs arrived today, so I’ll be spending the evening filling orders.  Thank goodness for podcasts; I can make good use of the time.

Speaking of podcasts, I realize the Netflix release has attracted hundreds if not thousands of new readers to the blog (judging by Google Analytics), and many of those new readers are eager to learn more (judging by my inbox).  For those of you who don’t already know, you can get a free and ongoing education in health and nutrition by listening to podcast shows.  Bloggers like Jimmy Moore and Sean Croxton regularly interview some of the top researchers in the field.  I can’t begin tell you how much I’ve learned just by listening to podcasts while driving, taking long walks, or doing mundane chores.

So here’s a list of my favorite podcasters with links to their shows:

The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show (Jimmy Moore)

Underground Wellness (Sean Croxton)

Carbohydrates Can Kill (Dr. Robert Su)

My Low-Carb Journey (Hank Garner)

Most of the podcast sites have an archive page where you can see a list of previous episode topics and guests.  Pretty much anything you want to know, someone has interviewed an expert in the field.

Enjoy the free education.  It’s one of the great benefits of the digital age.

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38 thoughts on “A Free Education

  1. Sash A

    My sister just informed me of your website and I was totally blown away. I always thought margarine was a bad source of cooking because “hydrogenated” oils have such a horrible process to them. But, like most people, I kept buying stuff like “canola” oil because I was told it was “good” for me. Now that I know better, I’ll be swapping everything I have out for the more natural stuff. Thank you very much for all that you do to educate people!

    Enjoy the butter!

    Reply
  2. Sash A

    My sister just informed me of your website and I was totally blown away. I always thought margarine was a bad source of cooking because “hydrogenated” oils have such a horrible process to them. But, like most people, I kept buying stuff like “canola” oil because I was told it was “good” for me. Now that I know better, I’ll be swapping everything I have out for the more natural stuff. Thank you very much for all that you do to educate people!

    Enjoy the butter!

    Reply
  3. D. Sterner

    I’m surprised that Robb Wolf isn’t one of your favs… Maybe its the adolescent joking around that isn’t really all that funny. But the info is pretty good, when he gets around to it. http://robbwolf.com/category/podcasts/ (Author of the Paleo Solution for the newbies)

    I haven’t heard his before, but I’ll try to get around to them. The problem (a good problem) is that there’s more great stuff out that than I have time to absorb.

    Reply
  4. chuck

    Sash:

    Great to hear you have learned something and then taken action. It is nice to see an impact being made by this site. The movie made by Tom is a must see for anyone interested their health.

    Reply
  5. Anna

    Have to agree that podcasts are an awesome way to get educated and also pass the time! I have a little zip-close iPod player that is very durable, and it just travels around the house with me.
    http://www.amazon.com/iHome-iH13-Portable-Protective-Speaker/dp/B000QZ7232/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1300194141&sr=8-2
    (I thought they didn’t make it anymore, but looks like they do. Awesome.)

    Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to fix a bread-free breakfast for my 5-year-old.

    I have an iPod, but take my Creative Zen MP3 player with me when I travel because it uses a AAA battery. No worries about finding an outlet to charge it up.

    Reply
  6. D. Sterner

    I’m surprised that Robb Wolf isn’t one of your favs… Maybe its the adolescent joking around that isn’t really all that funny. But the info is pretty good, when he gets around to it. http://robbwolf.com/category/podcasts/ (Author of the Paleo Solution for the newbies)

    I haven’t heard his before, but I’ll try to get around to them. The problem (a good problem) is that there’s more great stuff out that than I have time to absorb.

    Reply
  7. chuck

    Sash:

    Great to hear you have learned something and then taken action. It is nice to see an impact being made by this site. The movie made by Tom is a must see for anyone interested their health.

    Reply
  8. Anna

    Have to agree that podcasts are an awesome way to get educated and also pass the time! I have a little zip-close iPod player that is very durable, and it just travels around the house with me.
    http://www.amazon.com/iHome-iH13-Portable-Protective-Speaker/dp/B000QZ7232/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1300194141&sr=8-2
    (I thought they didn’t make it anymore, but looks like they do. Awesome.)

    Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to fix a bread-free breakfast for my 5-year-old.

    I have an iPod, but take my Creative Zen MP3 player with me when I travel because it uses a AAA battery. No worries about finding an outlet to charge it up.

    Reply
  9. JasonB

    Hey Tom,

    Quick question for you and your diet. I recently (5 months or so ago) started with a diet very similar to your own. About 100-120 carbs a day max, and mostly from veggies and fruits. I noticed that my farts starting smelling horrendous. To the point where my wife and kids started to complain. I used to give my wife dutch ovens as a joke when we were cuddling in bed, but now if I do it, she gets upset. Did you notice any change in the smell of your farts when you started to phase out carbs from your diet? I’m swimming in a sea of fart juice over here and I need to know what the problem is!!

    Thanks 🙂 And keep up the good work on your blog.

    -Jason B.

    LOL … I didn’t check that variable. I can tell you that after giving up grains and legumes, there were fewer samples for testing.

    Reply
  10. Sarah

    Hey Tom, random question.

    I have a friend I’d like to cook for, but she’s allergic to avocados, coconuts, and nuts EXCEPT peanuts. Since coconut and avocado oils are out of the question, I was wondering if peanut oil would be an alright oil to cook with? I know I could also use butter but, I wanted to expand my fat options a little bit.

    Mary Enig, author of “Know Your Fats,” says peanut oil is fine in limited amounts. Too much, she says, can cause inflammation. Have you tried coconut oil?

    Reply
  11. JasonB

    Hey Tom,

    Quick question for you and your diet. I recently (5 months or so ago) started with a diet very similar to your own. About 100-120 carbs a day max, and mostly from veggies and fruits. I noticed that my farts starting smelling horrendous. To the point where my wife and kids started to complain. I used to give my wife dutch ovens as a joke when we were cuddling in bed, but now if I do it, she gets upset. Did you notice any change in the smell of your farts when you started to phase out carbs from your diet? I’m swimming in a sea of fart juice over here and I need to know what the problem is!!

    Thanks 🙂 And keep up the good work on your blog.

    -Jason B.

    LOL … I didn’t check that variable. I can tell you that after giving up grains and legumes, there were fewer samples for testing.

    Reply
  12. Lori

    @JasonB, my GI problems were farther up, but I’ll tell you what I learned while solving them.

    According to the book Heartburn Cured by Norm Robillard, dietary fat produces little, if any, gas. Protein produces some in the lower GI system. Carbohydrate produces far and away the most gas. Anecdotally, cruciferous vegetables, apples and cucumbers are among the worst gas producers in the fruit and vegetable realm.

    IMHO, fruit isn’t necessary in the human diet (consider that until recently, it was available only seasonally) and veg is good but overrated. Atkins recommended his patients eat two small green salads a day (around two cups, by my estimate). That’s around 10g of total carb. Non-starchy vegetables, as a group, have more nutrients than fruit and a lot less carb. So if you eat one or big salads and ditch the fruit, you’ll be eating a fraction of the carbs you eat now, while still getting lots of nutrients.

    Here’s a link to a chart I made comparing some common vegetables and fruits:
    http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll320/loriinenglewood/Fruitsandvegchart-1.jpg

    Reply
  13. tracker

    @Jason B, I’ve noticed a decrease of intestinal gas in general since I started eating low carb (I try to keep my carbs under 20 a day). I also avoid fiber too. I tell you, you forget how much activity goes on in the intestines when you consume wheat if you go off this diet for a meal. I’d try cutting out (or at least cutting back on) the wheat, and anything else with a lot of fiber in it, including beans and high fiber vegetables. Amazingly enough, constipation isn’t a problem. I personally think it’s the lack of gluten.

    @Sarah, we cook with lard. You might have a hard time finding any that isn’t hydrogenated but you can render your own. We buy ours wholesale because a friend owns a restaurant.

    Tom, I like podcasts but our internet is so slow, it usually takes 20 minutes to download one of Jimmy’s. I have to pick carefully 🙂

    Reply
  14. Sarah

    Hey Tom, random question.

    I have a friend I’d like to cook for, but she’s allergic to avocados, coconuts, and nuts EXCEPT peanuts. Since coconut and avocado oils are out of the question, I was wondering if peanut oil would be an alright oil to cook with? I know I could also use butter but, I wanted to expand my fat options a little bit.

    Mary Enig, author of “Know Your Fats,” says peanut oil is fine in limited amounts. Too much, she says, can cause inflammation. Have you tried coconut oil?

    Reply
  15. Lori

    @JasonB, my GI problems were farther up, but I’ll tell you what I learned while solving them.

    According to the book Heartburn Cured by Norm Robillard, dietary fat produces little, if any, gas. Protein produces some in the lower GI system. Carbohydrate produces far and away the most gas. Anecdotally, cruciferous vegetables, apples and cucumbers are among the worst gas producers in the fruit and vegetable realm.

    IMHO, fruit isn’t necessary in the human diet (consider that until recently, it was available only seasonally) and veg is good but overrated. Atkins recommended his patients eat two small green salads a day (around two cups, by my estimate). That’s around 10g of total carb. Non-starchy vegetables, as a group, have more nutrients than fruit and a lot less carb. So if you eat one or big salads and ditch the fruit, you’ll be eating a fraction of the carbs you eat now, while still getting lots of nutrients.

    Here’s a link to a chart I made comparing some common vegetables and fruits:
    http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll320/loriinenglewood/Fruitsandvegchart-1.jpg

    Reply
  16. Lori

    Bread and beans are mostly starch–especially bread. It’s the starch and sugar that are typically attached to the fiber that lead to gas.

    Gas is created when microbes consume protein or carbohydrate. However, fiber is indigestible, so I don’t see how it would cause gas. Robillard says in his book, “However, if starches and sugars are consumed in excess, more of these carbs will escape absorption [into the bloodstream from the small intestine] and become available for the intestinal gas.” He also says to use net carbs (i.e., subtract the fiber) when calculating what to eat to avoid heartburn. Granted, this is from a book on heartburn, not flatulence, but I believe the same principles apply.

    Reply
  17. tracker

    @Jason B, I’ve noticed a decrease of intestinal gas in general since I started eating low carb (I try to keep my carbs under 20 a day). I also avoid fiber too. I tell you, you forget how much activity goes on in the intestines when you consume wheat if you go off this diet for a meal. I’d try cutting out (or at least cutting back on) the wheat, and anything else with a lot of fiber in it, including beans and high fiber vegetables. Amazingly enough, constipation isn’t a problem. I personally think it’s the lack of gluten.

    @Sarah, we cook with lard. You might have a hard time finding any that isn’t hydrogenated but you can render your own. We buy ours wholesale because a friend owns a restaurant.

    Tom, I like podcasts but our internet is so slow, it usually takes 20 minutes to download one of Jimmy’s. I have to pick carefully 🙂

    Reply
  18. Lori

    Bread and beans are mostly starch–especially bread. It’s the starch and sugar that are typically attached to the fiber that lead to gas.

    Gas is created when microbes consume protein or carbohydrate. However, fiber is indigestible, so I don’t see how it would cause gas. Robillard says in his book, “However, if starches and sugars are consumed in excess, more of these carbs will escape absorption [into the bloodstream from the small intestine] and become available for the intestinal gas.” He also says to use net carbs (i.e., subtract the fiber) when calculating what to eat to avoid heartburn. Granted, this is from a book on heartburn, not flatulence, but I believe the same principles apply.

    Reply
  19. gallier2

    @Lori
    not true, fiber are indigestibe for us, but colon bacteria can pretty well thrive on them. Read up on FODMAPS, or inulin (the farting agent of beans and other plants).
    You’re still right though that too much carbs can end up in the colon if overloaded, especially fructose, it adds to the problem.

    Reply
  20. JasonB

    @Lori,

    How bad are your farts, would you say? Imagining a girl farting is just kinda gross, so maybe I should get my wife off of the carbs 🙂

    Reply
  21. gallier2

    @Lori
    not true, fiber are indigestibe for us, but colon bacteria can pretty well thrive on them. Read up on FODMAPS, or inulin (the farting agent of beans and other plants).
    You’re still right though that too much carbs can end up in the colon if overloaded, especially fructose, it adds to the problem.

    Reply
  22. JasonB

    @Lori,

    How bad are your farts, would you say? Imagining a girl farting is just kinda gross, so maybe I should get my wife off of the carbs 🙂

    Reply
  23. Anthony DiSante

    My first thought when seeing this list was: “What, no Robb Wolf? No Chris Kresser?” I’m glad to see other commenters agree. Those two guys are stinkin’ geniuses when it comes to nutrition and physiology, and their podcasts should definitely be on your must-listen list. As Steve mentioned, they’re at http://robbwolf.com/ and http://thehealthyskeptic.org/ .

    I’m sure they’re good. I just haven’t gotten around to following their podcasts yet. Thanks for the links.

    Reply
  24. Anthony DiSante

    My first thought when seeing this list was: “What, no Robb Wolf? No Chris Kresser?” I’m glad to see other commenters agree. Those two guys are stinkin’ geniuses when it comes to nutrition and physiology, and their podcasts should definitely be on your must-listen list. As Steve mentioned, they’re at http://robbwolf.com/ and http://thehealthyskeptic.org/ .

    I’m sure they’re good. I just haven’t gotten around to following their podcasts yet. Thanks for the links.

    Reply
  25. JasonB

    @Lori

    I’ve noticed that my farts aren’t as frequent on a low carb diet, but they are more wet. They can leave some skid marks 🙁

    Reply
  26. JasonB

    @Lori

    I’ve noticed that my farts aren’t as frequent on a low carb diet, but they are more wet. They can leave some skid marks 🙁

    Reply
  27. Julie Lohman

    Hi Tom! I very much enjoyed Fathead. I have been living a low carb lifestyle since November and feel fantastic and a little lighter too. I had posted a comment on Gary Taubes website and someone commented you might have some experience with my question. She thought she saw it was on your blog but I was unable to find it.

    I am a recovering alcoholic of 4 years and put on 40 pounds since. I noticed after I stopped drinking I could not get enough carbs specifically sugar and hfcs. I noticed I wasn’t alone in this because my friends in recovery have had the same problem. Insulin resistance and diabetes are also a huge issue with us.

    Alcoholics Anonymous uses the term “allergy” to describe the physical craving that goes along with alcoholism. I’m wondering if this is related to the carbohydrates in alcohol and if there is any connection between diabetes/insulin resistance in alcoholics. In my experience the withdrawal from alcohol felt very similar to the withdrawal of carbohydrates.

    I’m just interested if any research has been done to prove alcoholics are super sensitive to the effects of levels of high insulin. If you have any input that would be great! Thanks.

    Nora Gedgaudas described alcohol addiction as a form of sugar addiction in her wonderful book, Primal Body/Primal Mind.

    I wrote about my own experience in this post:

    http://www.fathead-movie.com/index.php/2009/04/30/primal-body-primal-mind-primal-tools/

    There’s some limited research on the relationship between alcohol and insulin sensitivity:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219180504.htm

    I feel obligated to repeat a point I stressed in my podcast interview with Nora: When I changed my diet and overcame my addiction to carbohydrates, drinking alcohol no longer induced strong cravings for still more alcohol. I am now a moderate drinker … a glass or two of wine now and then, a pint or two of beer now and then. I actually begin to feel full and don’t want anymore. That being said, I would never, ever encourage a recovering alcoholic to attempt drinking normally again, diet or no diet.

    Reply
  28. Julie Lohman

    Thanks for the info Tom! I don’t plan on trying moderate drinking out for myself….the world’s a better place without me drinking. I’m glad it has worked for you. Sorry AA was a bad experience for you because it literally saved my butt! AA is generally for those of us that have more problems than just alcohol and I agree it’s not for everybody.

    I really think there is something to this and I’m going to get a copy of Nora’s book. I know how much better I feel eating this way…..I’m limiting my daughters carb intake as well and have noticed great improvements in her behavior. Now if her school would cooperate…..grrr

    It was during AA meetings that I realized I wasn’t quite like the other people in the room, so I quit going to meetings. I did stop drinking completely for three years, however.

    Reply
  29. Julie Lohman

    Hi Tom! I very much enjoyed Fathead. I have been living a low carb lifestyle since November and feel fantastic and a little lighter too. I had posted a comment on Gary Taubes website and someone commented you might have some experience with my question. She thought she saw it was on your blog but I was unable to find it.

    I am a recovering alcoholic of 4 years and put on 40 pounds since. I noticed after I stopped drinking I could not get enough carbs specifically sugar and hfcs. I noticed I wasn’t alone in this because my friends in recovery have had the same problem. Insulin resistance and diabetes are also a huge issue with us.

    Alcoholics Anonymous uses the term “allergy” to describe the physical craving that goes along with alcoholism. I’m wondering if this is related to the carbohydrates in alcohol and if there is any connection between diabetes/insulin resistance in alcoholics. In my experience the withdrawal from alcohol felt very similar to the withdrawal of carbohydrates.

    I’m just interested if any research has been done to prove alcoholics are super sensitive to the effects of levels of high insulin. If you have any input that would be great! Thanks.

    Nora Gedgaudas described alcohol addiction as a form of sugar addiction in her wonderful book, Primal Body/Primal Mind.

    I wrote about my own experience in this post:

    http://www.fathead-movie.com/index.php/2009/04/30/primal-body-primal-mind-primal-tools/

    There’s some limited research on the relationship between alcohol and insulin sensitivity:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041219180504.htm

    I feel obligated to repeat a point I stressed in my podcast interview with Nora: When I changed my diet and overcame my addiction to carbohydrates, drinking alcohol no longer induced strong cravings for still more alcohol. I am now a moderate drinker … a glass or two of wine now and then, a pint or two of beer now and then. I actually begin to feel full and don’t want anymore. That being said, I would never, ever encourage a recovering alcoholic to attempt drinking normally again, diet or no diet.

    Reply
  30. Julie Lohman

    Thanks for the info Tom! I don’t plan on trying moderate drinking out for myself….the world’s a better place without me drinking. I’m glad it has worked for you. Sorry AA was a bad experience for you because it literally saved my butt! AA is generally for those of us that have more problems than just alcohol and I agree it’s not for everybody.

    I really think there is something to this and I’m going to get a copy of Nora’s book. I know how much better I feel eating this way…..I’m limiting my daughters carb intake as well and have noticed great improvements in her behavior. Now if her school would cooperate…..grrr

    It was during AA meetings that I realized I wasn’t quite like the other people in the room, so I quit going to meetings. I did stop drinking completely for three years, however.

    Reply

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