Took awhile to get Premiere and YouTube to play nicely together, but I finally managed to chop up the speech in an acceptable format and upload it — twice. The first time, it turned out one of the clips exceeded the 15-minute limit, so I had to re-edit and re-upload.

I elected to edit the slides into Premiere for better clarity, but of course some of the text is difficult to read if you’re not viewing the slides on a nice, big screen.  The tape ran out shortly into Q & A, so I’m skipping that.

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117 Responses to “Video of the “Big Fat Fiasco” Speech”
  1. J.M. says:

    Tom,
    I have watched many videos and read many reports on this same thing. I started LC diet 4 days ago. One thing I am not seeing much information about that I suspect also has to do with the poorness of our diets is the corn industry. We grow massive amounts of corn in the U.S., so it’s both cheap and plentiful. I am fairly certain this lead to the push to use HFCS as opposed to importing much of our sugar (or perhaps shipping it from Hawaii? I’m not certain).

    Are there any shady deals between the government and the corn growers?

    The shady deal is that corn is heavily subsidized. If you haven’t seen it yet, I’d recommend watching “King Corn.”

  2. Kelly says:

    Fantastic. I’ve been pushing Good Calories, Bad Calories like I am getting paid for it, but it isn’t easy to get people to read a book the size of the phone book.
    I’m sharing this like crazy.

  3. maria says:

    I’m looking for a captioned video of this speech. My best friend is deaf and her father works for the FDA and she’s so very interested in this lecture. If no captioned video exists is there a transcript of the lecture?

    There’s no captioned version, but I’ve got the Word document somewhere at home. Send me an email reminder next week.

  4. Benjamin says:

    I’m down 32 lbs in 3 months. We cut out sugar and almost all flour. It’s a low carb lifestyle @ ~50 carbs per day. I’m loving life – eating all the beef, chicken, cheese and fresh veggies I can get my hands on. This was a life a life changer for me. Thank you for Big Fat Fiasco. Thank you.

    I’m delighted to know the speech played a part in your renewed health.

  5. D. Smith says:

    @ J.M.: You should read Nina Planck’s book called “Real Food – what to eat and why” – she has a whole section in there about corn, good and bad. A fair and non-biased look. (It’s in the section about grains starting at the bottom of page 219). Nina makes reference to another book called “The Story of Corn” by Betty Fussell but I haven’t read that one yet. Might be an eye-opener about the corn industry. We’ve been HAD, for sure. Unsoaked corn depletes human stores of B3 and we need B3 to survive! So, some corn is ok but most commercial corn uses are just crap. Farming didn’t help America, it hurt America – our land, our people and our health.

  6. S Blackbourn says:

    I recently went on the WHO website to check for the cholesterol data myself. I could’t find the actual data that you refer to but this is what it says if you type cholesterol into the search bar. — “Raised cholesterol increases the risks of heart disease and stroke. Globally, a third of ischaemic heart disease is attributable to high cholesterol. Overall, raised cholesterol is estimated to cause 2.6 million deaths (4.5% of total) and 29.7 million disability adjusted life years (DALYS), or 2.0% of total DALYS. Raised total cholesterol is a major cause of disease burden in both the developed and developing world as a risk factor for Ischemic heart disease and stroke. A 10% reduction in serum cholesterol in men aged 40 has been reported to result in a 50% reduction in heart disease within 5 years; the same serum cholesterol reduction for men aged 70 years can result in an average 20% reduction in heart disease occurrence in the next 5 years. In Ireland, a 30% reduction in the heart disease death rate has been attributed to 4.6% reduction of the population mean for total cholesterol. In Finland, 50% of the decline in IHD mortality has been explained by the reduction of population blood cholesterol level.” —
    How does one make sense of all this? They actually describe raised cholesterol as a “major cause” of heart disease.

    It’s pure nonsense. If you analyze the American Heart Association’s own data, you’ll find that nearly 75% of people who suffer heart attacks have normal or low cholesterol. To goose up the statistics, they count people who have hyperlipidemia, a genetic defect that 1) raises cholesterol to screamingly high levels and 2) makes those who have it prone to heart attacks, although it’s probably the inability to process LDL that does the damage, not the high cholesterol itself. Take those people out of the equation, and you get no correlation.

  7. Marge says:

    This video makes a lot of sense to me. I have always maintained that a more primitive (i.e. less processed) diet results in better health. However, my husband and I are both vegetarians, so we are of necessity getting most of our nutrition from plant sources, with a little bit of fish. When my husband’s doctor told him his cholesterol levels were edging up, I made him stop buttering his bread and taking cheese sandwiches to work. I now wonder if it was the bread in the sandwiches which I should have restricted, and not the cheese and/or butter. I would like to know if there is information on how to control diet and blood sugar/insulin levels while still eschewing most animal proteins.

    It wasn’t the cheese and butter. There are good low-carb cookbooks out there that include recipes for vegetarians.

  8. Dave Vickery says:

    After watching the film, I started doing a little more reading, starting with Eat fat, Lose fat. I then began re-introducing natural fats such as butter, coconut oil, milk and animal fats. These helped me eliminate most carbohydrates, as I lost craving for them. I lost 55 pounds in 4 months and my energy level is through the roof. I was able to stop taking hypertension meds as well. Ironically, I did all this by “not dieting”. I simply allowed myself to eat good foods that I’d been taught to believe were bad for me.

    Without attempting to recruit anybody, friends and family were curious what I was doing. There are now several others within my personal circles that have taken similar steps to re-introduce natural fats, more red meat, reduce carbs. They’ve all lost many pounds and have improved their health.

    All fantastic and miraculous stuff, NOT following FDA and AHA guidelines. My cholesterol is up, but it is all HDL runs in the 70s.

    Outstanding results.

  9. Lance says:

    My 82 year old mother is healthier than all of her cohorts…the main difference? She refuses to take cholesterol meds and a myriad of other things they want her to take. As soon as her friends started decreasing such drugs, their aches and pains and crippling join paind subsided. When mom takes drugs, she gets sick. And when she stops them, she gets better. But the physicians are very, very skilled at bullying these older gals into taking that crap. So it is not just with the diet that the lies are so plentiful, the medical establishment has been running, and still is, steam forward with promoting these lies, and at a profit! That is immoral at the core.

  10. Dan Persson says:

    Thanks for the splendid video. I think every medical doctor should see it.
    /Dan Persson from Sweden

  11. Tjeerd says:

    Here is a graph showing the number of deaths vs saturated fat intake in several European countries

    http://freetheanimal.com/2009/03/saturated-fat-epidemiology-for-math-geeks.html

  12. Alex says:

    This is a great series of videos. I’ve sent it to my parents hoping that they see the light!

  13. This is a great lecture which I sent to my friends because it is very clear and logical and very entertaining. You should really make a cleaner, one reel, version using a lapel microphone and a direct power point connection. Loading the 5 segment is very distracting and unnecessary as there are many much longer videos on youtube.
    I much prefer this presentation to the fathead movie, which is much less focused and repetitive.
    Maybe you could do this as a TED lecture using the same power point!

    If I get chance to record it again, that’s what I’ll do.

  14. David A. Evans says:

    I’ve been telling my friends that natural animal fats are good for you. Unfortunately they believe the crap they’re fed on not just this but salt.

    About salt, I tell them that the only bad salt diet is a low salt diet as whatever the amounts you take, the body absorbs what it needs and any excess passes straight through in the urine.

    DaveE.

  15. Paul Kayley says:

    Hi Tom, Great presentation. Your delivery style is excellent and very funny whilst retaining credibility. Your description of the infiltrative theory of heart disease was also good. This is something I once liked the sound of myself, but I’m now more taken with the “Degenerated Lipid Hypothesis” proposed by Dr Chris Masterjohn.
    http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2011_02_01_archive.html

    You didn’t mention the implications of all the PUFA-rich oils in western diets which I believe to be more dangerous than the carbohydrate problem. Keep up the good work.

    I agree; there’s more than one factor in all this.

  16. Jyrki R says:

    This is so good. The best description of reasons to getting fat and diabetic I have seen. This guy is a good teacher.

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